2

votes

Supplements: coq10, Vitamin K2 are they needed?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 25, 2011 at 10:00 PM

Currently I am not having any supplement, but two substances raised my interest: co-enzime q10 which is produced by the body but its production diminishes with age, to the extent that some people believe that it is one of the substances that drives aging at the cells level http://www.yourhealthbase.com/coenzyme_Q10.htm and also vitamin k2 that also has great qualities, being a key factor in the prevention of osteoporosis and vascular Calcification http://www.suite101.com/content/can-anything-cure-vascular-calcification-a155895 while often not found in sufficient quantities in our food intake, unless you consume unrealistic amounts of eggs or milk.

Do you supplement with any of these substances, or have you thought about them?

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on April 04, 2013
at 07:59 PM

Sounds like you need a new doctor.

2b2c2e4aa87e9aa4c99cae48e980f70d

(1059)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:46 AM

Look for Kerrygold butter, it is surprisingly commonly available. It s nit advertised specifically as pastured.

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on September 21, 2011
at 08:47 PM

I just started K2 supplementation a few days ago and I swear I think mine are already fading too.

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on February 28, 2011
at 07:53 PM

Hey Travis, what vitamin C supplement do you use? Thinking about including C supplementation, on the search for the best brand/form.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 28, 2011
at 04:26 PM

interesting information!

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 27, 2011
at 03:18 PM

Kate thanks a lot for your very informative answer!

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 27, 2011
at 03:17 PM

Helen thanks a lot for your information, this is very useful. I often have problems to get pastured products so I totally agree with supplementation in these cases!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 27, 2011
at 12:07 AM

By all means do what works for you. If the spider veins return when you stop supplementing, I'm not going to argue with that! :-)

Caa1d5b91f44cc9da8826e171320f4ac

on February 26, 2011
at 03:11 PM

There is some evidence to suggest that Coq10 levels begin to decline in early middle age. If you are not physically active, you can probably get by without a supplement. If you are physically active you'll benefit from a supplement, or eat heart regularly. And yes, some varieties of aged cheese (especially Dutch gouda) are a good source of K2 year-round.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 26, 2011
at 03:00 PM

From what I have read, there is menaquinone (K-2 animal derived) and phylloquinone (K-1 plant derived), so it looks like NOW Foods K-2 is a combination of K-2 and K-1. But whatever, it works and I can afford it, so that makes it ok by me. A "better" product does me very little good if I can't even afford to buy it. Plus, when I take less, the veins come back. So although I take alot according to some study, what I am doing works for me. I live in an area where pastured products are not available. Nor could I afford them even if they were. I do the best I can with the resourses I have.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on February 26, 2011
at 06:33 AM

Paul Jaminet's Perfect Health Diet supplementation recommendations are D3, k2 (mk4), selenium, iodine, Vitamin C, magnesium, copper and chromium.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:33 AM

FWIW, the NOW Foods K-2 is 100mcg of K2-MK7. MK4 is animal derived and NOW claims to be a vegetarian product, QED it's MK7. BTW, that's a lot of K2 you're taking. The Rotterdam study showed marked improvement at ~45mcg/day, you're about 5 times that level.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:31 AM

FWIW, the NOW Foods K-2 is 100mcg of K2-MK7. The MK-4 is animal derived and it claims to be a vegetarian product, QED it's MK-7. BTW, that's a lot of K2 you're taking. The Rotterdam study showed marked improvement at ~45mcg/day, you're about 5 times that.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:17 AM

Also, fermented hard cheese is a good source of K2 year-round.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:16 AM

I don't see how you can make that statement in regards to CoQ10. From the little bit I've seen, at best your statement is true for the elderly. For otherwise healthy young & middle aged people CoQ10 is readily produced by the body.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 26, 2011
at 12:29 AM

Well, for a long time, vitamin K *cream* has been a remedy for spider veins, so I figured that if I had spider veins on my ankles and nose, I must have them where I *can't* see them, too. So I decided to take K-2 caps.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 25, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Thank you for posting this, Helen. I have very vein-y legs, and I'm so young! (I had always regarded it as a condition for the elderly, and can't figure out why I'm struggling with it.) I'm definitely going to research this further, and I really appreciate the information share. :)

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 25, 2011
at 11:10 PM

I can't get pastured *anything* around here, except eggs :(

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:59 PM

I take 2 NOW Foods K-2 capsules per day, one in the morning and one in the evening.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:29 PM

That's very interesting; what type and dosage?

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8 Answers

6
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:18 PM

I supplement with K-2 and since I started doing so, all of the spider veins I had in my ankles and at the sides of my nose have disappeared.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:29 PM

That's very interesting; what type and dosage?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:33 AM

FWIW, the NOW Foods K-2 is 100mcg of K2-MK7. MK4 is animal derived and NOW claims to be a vegetarian product, QED it's MK7. BTW, that's a lot of K2 you're taking. The Rotterdam study showed marked improvement at ~45mcg/day, you're about 5 times that level.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 26, 2011
at 12:29 AM

Well, for a long time, vitamin K *cream* has been a remedy for spider veins, so I figured that if I had spider veins on my ankles and nose, I must have them where I *can't* see them, too. So I decided to take K-2 caps.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:59 PM

I take 2 NOW Foods K-2 capsules per day, one in the morning and one in the evening.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:31 AM

FWIW, the NOW Foods K-2 is 100mcg of K2-MK7. The MK-4 is animal derived and it claims to be a vegetarian product, QED it's MK-7. BTW, that's a lot of K2 you're taking. The Rotterdam study showed marked improvement at ~45mcg/day, you're about 5 times that.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 26, 2011
at 03:00 PM

From what I have read, there is menaquinone (K-2 animal derived) and phylloquinone (K-1 plant derived), so it looks like NOW Foods K-2 is a combination of K-2 and K-1. But whatever, it works and I can afford it, so that makes it ok by me. A "better" product does me very little good if I can't even afford to buy it. Plus, when I take less, the veins come back. So although I take alot according to some study, what I am doing works for me. I live in an area where pastured products are not available. Nor could I afford them even if they were. I do the best I can with the resourses I have.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 27, 2011
at 03:17 PM

Helen thanks a lot for your information, this is very useful. I often have problems to get pastured products so I totally agree with supplementation in these cases!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 25, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Thank you for posting this, Helen. I have very vein-y legs, and I'm so young! (I had always regarded it as a condition for the elderly, and can't figure out why I'm struggling with it.) I'm definitely going to research this further, and I really appreciate the information share. :)

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 27, 2011
at 12:07 AM

By all means do what works for you. If the spider veins return when you stop supplementing, I'm not going to argue with that! :-)

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on September 21, 2011
at 08:47 PM

I just started K2 supplementation a few days ago and I swear I think mine are already fading too.

4
Caa1d5b91f44cc9da8826e171320f4ac

on February 26, 2011
at 03:06 AM

If, like so many of us, you are not lucky enough to have a source for pastured/grass-fed eggs, dairy and meat then you need to learn to love natto to get K2 into you diet. Even if you can get pastured products the K2 content drops to almost nil in the winter time, so other sources (natto or a supplement) are necessary to beat that seasonal trend.

As for CoQ10, as long as you are eating heart and liver regularly (once every couple of weeks at least) you don't need a supplement. Otherwise, you do.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:16 AM

I don't see how you can make that statement in regards to CoQ10. From the little bit I've seen, at best your statement is true for the elderly. For otherwise healthy young & middle aged people CoQ10 is readily produced by the body.

Caa1d5b91f44cc9da8826e171320f4ac

on February 26, 2011
at 03:11 PM

There is some evidence to suggest that Coq10 levels begin to decline in early middle age. If you are not physically active, you can probably get by without a supplement. If you are physically active you'll benefit from a supplement, or eat heart regularly. And yes, some varieties of aged cheese (especially Dutch gouda) are a good source of K2 year-round.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 27, 2011
at 03:18 PM

Kate thanks a lot for your very informative answer!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2011
at 05:17 AM

Also, fermented hard cheese is a good source of K2 year-round.

3
Medium avatar

on February 26, 2011
at 12:01 AM

I eat copious amounts of pastured butter, and thus consume large amounts of mk-7 k-2. I also eat natto on most days and as a result get pretty large amounts of mk-4 k-2. I would wager that one or the other would be sufficient for good health. I'm not convinced that coenzyme Q10 is necessary with our diets.

As far as supplementation in general goes, I do 5000IU for about 1/2 to 2/3rds of the year (high latitude) as well as 3 grams of vitamin C per day. Correct vitamin D levels necessitate correct vitamin k and vitamin A levels. People who supplement D (and presumably those who get a lot of sun) and don't get enough k-2 run into calcium issues. As far as the vitamin C goes, the research I've done indicates that ascorbate increases the excretion of urate, which has various deleterious effects ranging from high blood pressure to kidney disease. It's unlikely that a low-fructose diet would produce sufficiently high uric acid levels to cause problems, but lower uric acid in general is likely desirable.

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on February 28, 2011
at 07:53 PM

Hey Travis, what vitamin C supplement do you use? Thinking about including C supplementation, on the search for the best brand/form.

2
7767e05a8c4504f6be03f13ee40815cd

(1299)

on February 26, 2011
at 10:27 AM

For people with moderately high blood pressure, CoQ-10 is probably much preferable to pharmaceuticals. It definitely helped me out, as part of my healthy eating and exercise regimen my BP has been reduced about 20 points sys/7 points dia.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 28, 2011
at 04:26 PM

interesting information!

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:49 PM

pastured dairy provides plenty of k2, specifically butter, ghee, raw milk, cream. if you can't do dairy foods, try high vitamin butter oil as a supplement. even people who cannot tolerate casein/lactose can almost definitely tolerate hvbo, as there is virtully zero lactose and very little casein.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 25, 2011
at 11:10 PM

I can't get pastured *anything* around here, except eggs :(

2b2c2e4aa87e9aa4c99cae48e980f70d

(1059)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:46 AM

Look for Kerrygold butter, it is surprisingly commonly available. It s nit advertised specifically as pastured.

1
Cd8347f1d512972a230b209419b8df4c

(100)

on February 25, 2011
at 10:29 PM

0
C3e946c8516c70ffbbfa4e31056fe64d

on April 04, 2013
at 07:13 PM

great info...one thing though, according to my doc, our bodies don't convert vitamin D from the sun any longer, so we all need vitamin D. It is one of the things that we need every day. My husband was recently diagnosed with a vitamin D deficiency, it was sore limbs, neck pain, no energy, tired, etc. Took a vitamin D drop that he got from the natural doc, which amounted to 4000 units a day, but went directly into the body through the mouth, not the stomach. In four days he was feeling alot better. Just hoping this info helps someone. :)

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on April 04, 2013
at 07:59 PM

Sounds like you need a new doctor.

0
38d45921e803c69a82a4ea765093b323

on February 26, 2011
at 12:01 AM

i guess in retrospect supplementation alway seems to be at least disputable. I would try to get those things by natural sources.

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