5

votes

Sugar sources: fructose, glucose, sucrose anything paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 04, 2011 at 6:29 PM

If you had a maximum limit (for instance 50 grams per day or so) of sugar consumption, which sources would you use? I mean if you had to choose between having two or three pieces of fruit (apple, orange, etc) or having instead the equivalent amount of sugar in the form of sucrose or glucose, what would be your choice? I do not have weight nor metabolic problems, and I am not using any sodas or anything else having HFCS. I do have some fruit (orange, apples or bananas) daily. If I were to switch to having coffee or tea sweetened with sucrose or glucose instead of fruits, I would keep constant my sugar intake, lose the nutrients from fruits (fiber and vitamins) and gain the benefit of a presumably more healthy sugar (sucrose or glucose) rather than fructose. What would you do? What would be the benefits and problems related to that change?

Bb1ba0d71083ceaecd3a3b405a977454

(891)

on May 15, 2012
at 02:05 AM

http://www.reducetriglycerides.com/reader_triglycerides_low_fructose_fruit.htm

2b423e7f4d4d6e13e820dcee5a3be746

(143)

on March 25, 2011
at 07:49 PM

Xylitol is incorporated into many sugar-free chewing gums and is good for limiting cariogenic bacteria in the oral environment. It can't be used by the bacteria that break down teeth. But yes, I've also read that in large amounts, can cause GI distress. And to not give it to dogs.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 10, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Xylitol is the least problematic of the sugar alcohols, and not a problem for the average, healthy person - hence PaNu's qualification that IBS irritation is "possible". You have to consume unusually large amounts to see GI distress, and it definitely does act a prebiotic, encouraging the growth of organisms that don't form harmful biofilms. Thus in small amounts, it has been shown to be helpful for GI health. Individual responses vary, of course. Besides all of that, it just has too many other benefits to ignore.

9e4b0fb414feb8577d05c4e95b1897f1

(125)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:01 AM

I don't know about Xylitol. I read a lot of bad stuff about it. Just, recently PANU wrote: "Sugar alcohols are not broken down in the small bowel, so they do not cause significant blood glucose elevation when eaten. They do get fermented in the colon, though, and it is possible to exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome or get osmotic diarrhea by, say, compulsively chewing sugarless gum or eating “diabetic” chocolates".

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 05, 2011
at 07:54 PM

Maltose actually has a higher glycemic index than glucose or sucrose! I wish I could tell you why, but I'm really not sure - Maltose is a disaccharide composed of two units of glucose. Puzzling, but true. It's also only about half as sweet as glucose.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 04, 2011
at 10:30 PM

Thanks for the link, Travis

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 04, 2011
at 08:24 PM

The best angle is to look up the recommendations for people with fructose malabsorption issues: http://john.toebes.com/diet.html

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 04, 2011
at 08:13 PM

My wild guess is that all sugar in fruits, apples, bananas, coconuts is fructose. Glucose is a by-product of carbs so any fruit with a large carb content will make you metabolise glucose.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:53 PM

But it doesn't specify the TYPE of sugar. For instance, I input coconut, and it gives grams of sugar, but not glucose, fructose, sucrose, etc...

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:10 PM

this is a good source for sugar content of fruits and other nutrients in foods http://nutritiondata.self.com/

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:10 PM

I've been wanting the same thing. I've seen the above list, but would like a more comprehensive one. Also, Certain foods might contain more fructose content when cooked v raw etc... this could be valuable info for a lot of people on here.

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:06 PM

http://www.thepaleodiet.com/nutritional_tools/fruits_table.html

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 04, 2011
at 06:38 PM

100% glucose is ideal, preferably in the form of starch.

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9 Answers

3
9e4b0fb414feb8577d05c4e95b1897f1

(125)

on February 05, 2011
at 04:27 AM

There is also this link which I found very helpful. It's for people with fructose intolerance which explains all different kinds of sugars. If it says not tolerated that means that there is fructose in it. http://www.bu.edu/aldolase/HFI/treatment/sugar_table.htm

Actually, I was also wondering whether it's OK to use tapioca syrup as a sweetener, since tapioca is considered a safe starch by some. From what I could find tapioca syrup has zero fructose, and contains glucose and maltose. Any thoughts?

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 05, 2011
at 07:54 PM

Maltose actually has a higher glycemic index than glucose or sucrose! I wish I could tell you why, but I'm really not sure - Maltose is a disaccharide composed of two units of glucose. Puzzling, but true. It's also only about half as sweet as glucose.

3
C90eecdd76cf57a387095fa49de23807

(960)

on February 04, 2011
at 06:39 PM

Welp. Sucrose is 50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose, so, in essence, you'd just be splitting those two sugars if you ate sucrose. My pick, and I'd guess the pick of most people here, would be glucose.

I think that I have a pretty big problem with fructose. Not only does fructose stall weight loss by triggering triglyceride production, but it also messes with leptin levels (read here, perhaps: http://paleopepper.com/2011/02/curing-physiological-drivers-of-binge-eating-with-a-paleo-diet/ or here: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/12/leptin-resistance-and-sugar.html). It's a giant No on my list, so glucose it would be. I don't consider nutrients from fruit to be particularly important. I get plenty of nutrients from eggs and from meat, and if I do in fact "need" antioxidants, I get plenty of those from my leafy greens.

3
Medium avatar

on February 04, 2011
at 06:38 PM

100% glucose is ideal, preferably in the form of a slow-digesting starch.

I try to keep fructose under 5 grams a day. It's a lot harder than you'd think.

2
C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:04 PM

does anyone have a list of fruits and their fructose/glucose breakdown. I know there is a limited amount of info on this on wikipedia, but I would love a comprehensive list.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:10 PM

I've been wanting the same thing. I've seen the above list, but would like a more comprehensive one. Also, Certain foods might contain more fructose content when cooked v raw etc... this could be valuable info for a lot of people on here.

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on February 04, 2011
at 07:06 PM

http://www.thepaleodiet.com/nutritional_tools/fruits_table.html

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 04, 2011
at 10:30 PM

Thanks for the link, Travis

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 04, 2011
at 08:24 PM

The best angle is to look up the recommendations for people with fructose malabsorption issues: http://john.toebes.com/diet.html

Bb1ba0d71083ceaecd3a3b405a977454

(891)

on May 15, 2012
at 02:05 AM

http://www.reducetriglycerides.com/reader_triglycerides_low_fructose_fruit.htm

1
902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 05, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Xylitol. Lower in total calories than regular sugars, just as sweet as sucrose w/o an aftertaste (though it does have a slight cooling sensation, like other sugar alcohols). Relatively minimal glycemic response. Peer reviewed evidence shows that it's fantastic for teeth - is not fermentable by plaque bacteria, actively reduces plaque by inhibiting production of sticky polysaccharides, alkalinizes saliva, promotes secretion of saliva and minerals in saliva, promotes remineralization of dentin and enamel, changes the balance of the oral microflora towards non-cariogenic species, etc etc. It acts as a probiotic, being converted into short-chain fatty acids in the colon. Preliminary evidence shows that it promotes remineralization of bone and retards osteoporosis. Retards all types of biofilms by the same mechanism by which it reduces plaque... but absorption to the bloodstream is likely minimal or nonexistent, so this would only be a topical effect. Anyway, I'm rambling now - but i've yet to find a better sweetener to use - if you must.

9e4b0fb414feb8577d05c4e95b1897f1

(125)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:01 AM

I don't know about Xylitol. I read a lot of bad stuff about it. Just, recently PANU wrote: "Sugar alcohols are not broken down in the small bowel, so they do not cause significant blood glucose elevation when eaten. They do get fermented in the colon, though, and it is possible to exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome or get osmotic diarrhea by, say, compulsively chewing sugarless gum or eating “diabetic” chocolates".

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 10, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Xylitol is the least problematic of the sugar alcohols, and not a problem for the average, healthy person - hence PaNu's qualification that IBS irritation is "possible". You have to consume unusually large amounts to see GI distress, and it definitely does act a prebiotic, encouraging the growth of organisms that don't form harmful biofilms. Thus in small amounts, it has been shown to be helpful for GI health. Individual responses vary, of course. Besides all of that, it just has too many other benefits to ignore.

2b423e7f4d4d6e13e820dcee5a3be746

(143)

on March 25, 2011
at 07:49 PM

Xylitol is incorporated into many sugar-free chewing gums and is good for limiting cariogenic bacteria in the oral environment. It can't be used by the bacteria that break down teeth. But yes, I've also read that in large amounts, can cause GI distress. And to not give it to dogs.

1
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on February 05, 2011
at 01:53 AM

I'd eat a couple of sweet potatoes with butter and cinnamon instead.

0
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 16, 2012
at 07:34 PM

This is an important post especially this time of the year. As many people are finding out, VLCing it AND going to the gym/crossfitting/HIIT/HIT/lifting weights do not go well together. Fructose, when consumed does very little for you as it can only recharge liver glycogen levels but not muscle. Unfortunately sucrose and therefore cake/candy/bagels/white bread/etc are 50% fructose.

Certain people (see above) do NEED carbohydrates that enter the body as glucose. Other than sweet potatoes, other caloric dense foods that fit this bill are white rice and white potatoes.

0
17c4ac2c3f75c9e37d196ea878ea94b5

(130)

on March 26, 2011
at 05:28 PM

I try to avoid sweet tasting things to keep my cravings down... but I have recently started using small amounts of stevia every now and again. A bit metallic if I use too much. You really need TINY amounts with it!

I have used xylitol but it seems to cause gastric upsets. (Wood alcohols do this in some people. So use the xylitol in moderation at the beginning, as Carisa mentioned.)

0
2f646741d650d87af55d5aeaa70d041c

on March 25, 2011
at 06:06 PM

erythritol is the least problematic of the sugar alcohols because it is absorbed in the small intestine and excreted unchanged in the urine. Xylitol is something I use regularly as well and unless you really binge on it, you will not have diarrhea. I got carried away with it one day and had just a bit of softening of the stool, that's it. Both are fine choices.

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