0

votes

Store bought pasteurized whole milk yogurt?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 30, 2012 at 3:33 AM

Lately i have been eating quite a bit of Strauss whole milk yogurt.

To make yogurt with raw milk you must heat the milk to 110 degrees and strauss pasteurizes their milk at 170 degrees.

Is that 60 degrees really that big of a deal?

What would be the concern of eating yogurt made with pasteurized milk vs raw milk?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Pasteurization occurs prior to culture.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:32 PM

110F is not sufficient to kill bacteria. Vat pasturization at 145F takes 30 minutes to complete.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:51 PM

110 degrees still preserves most of the nutrients. When you get above 118, and 140, thats when most of the killing happens. Same with raw milk cheese, some gets "thermalized" at 160 degrees, but its not 161, which is legally "pasteurized."

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:42 AM

um, but he heats his raw milk to 110 degrees. bye bye bacteria.

32937bdb4caf053e7aa39693fadd2282

(547)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:01 AM

probiotics are definitely present in pasteurized yogurt even the crummiest commercial brands

  • 32937bdb4caf053e7aa39693fadd2282

    asked by

    (547)
  • Views
    4.7K
  • Last Activity
    1409D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

4
C1484e8cfca0cc00f40da25d36f689b8

(374)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Both raw milk and pasteurized milk will be inoculated with a starter bacterial culture to jump start the process. The difference is which bacteria colonies you will get. In raw milk, you will obtain the natural bacteria and enzymes inherent in the milk from the cow that produced it. You could very well also have an overabundance of the yogurt culture bacteria if they outgrow the natives. With pasteurized milk, the native inhabitants will be killed in the process, and only those used in the culture will be present. Both offer probiotic bacteria, the populations are likely to vary. I don't know if there is any conclusive evidence to one being more beneficial than another, but raw is always a key word when it comes to health so. (n=1 it)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:32 PM

110F is not sufficient to kill bacteria. Vat pasturization at 145F takes 30 minutes to complete.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:42 AM

um, but he heats his raw milk to 110 degrees. bye bye bacteria.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:51 PM

110 degrees still preserves most of the nutrients. When you get above 118, and 140, thats when most of the killing happens. Same with raw milk cheese, some gets "thermalized" at 160 degrees, but its not 161, which is legally "pasteurized."

1
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Raw milk yogurt can be very tricky to handle, because the yogurt bacteria is competing with the natural bacteria in the milk. cultures for Health suggests keeping a "mother" culture with pasteurized or boiled milk for this reason. If you have access to raw milk, and want to make non heated yogurt, there are several room temperature yogurts that you can try.

That being said, the most important item in store bought milk would be the milk quality. Strauss uses mostly grass fed cows, with some silage and legumes, so it should be pretty good milk. Seeing as raw yogurt is almost impossible to buy (most states that allow raw milk do not allow any raw milk products), a grass fed whole milk yogurt is going to be an acceptable alternative.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Nothing to worry about eating pasteurized over raw product. There's a lot of hype around raw dairy, hard to separate the hype from the truth, and the hype comes along with the risk of food-borne illness.

-1
5af4bc9d2c390b0bcad9524f149c1b4f

(1101)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:50 AM

I do believe it kills off the probiotics when it's pasteurized, so I suppose there's not as much (if any) benefit compared to raw dairy. I still eat it because it's what I can afford, but it's more of a treat than something to supplement my diet.

32937bdb4caf053e7aa39693fadd2282

(547)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:01 AM

probiotics are definitely present in pasteurized yogurt even the crummiest commercial brands

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Pasteurization occurs prior to culture.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!