2

votes

Solid food whey protein substitute.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 03, 2011 at 1:33 AM

What are good substitutes for whey protein that are "paleo" meaning more specifically non-dairy?

I have been experimenting with paleo and strength training for a while and I have been taking whey supplements morning and afternoon for about 2 months. I have still managed to lose weight and gain muscle but I think I want to drop the dairy products because I have noticed unfavorable reactions like gas and acne breakouts.

I have heard that solid food is more optimal than shakes in most circumstances.

Thanks

65f4604519e22965923bc4d8e4582c1f

(10)

on October 04, 2011
at 06:40 AM

You had me at beef. I think I'm going to try to get a shipment of grass fed beef sticks to supplement workouts instead of whey... I'll see how that works out. Thanks

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:52 AM

What ben says, or throw some good raw eggs into your smoothie if you like ot drink your protien

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:21 AM

Meat. Whey is simply protein so meat, cottage cheese, etc would be fine

  • 65f4604519e22965923bc4d8e4582c1f

    asked by

    (10)
  • Views
    2.4K
  • Last Activity
    1281D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

best answer

3
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:36 AM

I'm personally a big fan of eating my protein, and my favourite is grass fed beef.

Taken from http://www.illpumpyouup.com/articles/10-reasons-to-eat-beef.htm

10 reason's to eat beef

1) Beef contains creatine. Beef is particularly effective at increasing strength and promoting muscle growth because it has a higher creatine content that any other food. Creatine is a muscle's source of fuel for the first few seconds during training. And it allows you to train harder for longer periods by replenishing adenosine tripphosphate (ATP).

2) Beef contains carnitine. Chicken and fish are extremely low in both carnitine and creatine. Beef, on the other hoof, is packed with both. Carnitine is needed to support normal fat metabolism and contributes branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), among the most important aminos for a bodybuilder in moss-building mode.

3) Beef contains potassium and protein. Potassium is a mineral that's lacking in the diets of most athletes. Low levels of potassium can inhibit protein synthesis, as well as the manufacture of growth hormone and IGF-l (the latter two are hormones utilized to stimulate muscle growth). Beef is also rich in protein: Four ounces of lean roast beef yield about 22 grams of first-class protein.

4) Beef contains alanine. Alanine is an amino acid that is used to make sugar from dietary protein. If your carb intake is low, alanine comes to the rescue by providing muscles with fuel to allow you to continue training. The beauty of alanine is that it spares muscles from providing the fuel for your heavy-duty workouts.

5) Beef is a low-fat source of CLA. There are cuts of beef that are low in fat. Eye of round steak, for example, is comparable in fat current to a lean chicken breast. Consider that fact that beef is replete with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a potent antioxidant that combats tissue damage from hardcore weight training. CLA has also been shown to preserve muscle mass by acting as an anticatabolic agent.

6) Beef contains iron. Iron is a blood-building mineral that is plentiful in beef, quite a contrast to the paltry amount of iron in chicken, and turkey.

7) Beef contains zinc and magnesium. Zinc is another antioxidant that contributes to protein synthesis and muscle growth. As with glutamine and B6, zinc reinforces the immune system. Magnesium supports protein synthesis, enhances muscle strength and improves the efficiency of insulin production, the body's primary anabolic hormone.

8) Beef contains vitamin B6. The higher your protein requirements, the more B6 you should add to your diet. There's enough vitamin B6 in red meat to beef up the immune system, which helps improve recovery from strenuous workouts while promoting protein metabolism and synthesis.

9) Beef contains vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is essential to the production of red blood cells; those cells deliver oxygen to muscle tissue. It also helps metabolize the byproducts of BCAAs to furnish the body with energy for hardcore training.

10) Beef offers variety. Chicken breasts are pretty boring when eaten day after day for several weeks or months. Round steak, flank steak, sirloin steak and filet mignon all vary in flavor and texture.

65f4604519e22965923bc4d8e4582c1f

(10)

on October 04, 2011
at 06:40 AM

You had me at beef. I think I'm going to try to get a shipment of grass fed beef sticks to supplement workouts instead of whey... I'll see how that works out. Thanks

0
6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on October 03, 2011
at 02:20 AM

I have started making an egg and bacon slice, cooked in the oven and then eating that PWO. Not sure of the nutritional stats, but each slice has 4 eggs, a slice of bacon, 150g sweet potato and some cheese.

pan fry 4 slices of bacon til crispy with 1 capsicum, then pan fry 600g of sweet potato cut into little cubes. put mixture in the bottom of a big quiche dish (i then put cheese in it, but if you want no dairy leave out). beat 12 eggs, add some chopped parsley, little garlic, salt and pepper. Pour over the bacon/sweet potato combo. put in the oven at 180 for 40 minutes.

I then eat 1/4 of this cold PWO. I cut it into quarters and put it all in the freezer, and take it out to defrost the night before. I make this on Sunday night and it lasts the week.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!