2

votes

SLEEP PARALYSIS AND VERY SCARED ABOUT

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 23, 2012 at 3:32 PM

Hi im 18 yo and my name is matteo. Are years that some night I get scared cause this sleep paralysis, when I'm waking up is like that I just can breathing a moving my tongue , because the rest of my body is already sleeping and it take 1 minute to return normal, I hate it for real . I have to say that my sleep is really bad, I sleep very little... 4-5 at max 6 hours per night, and I like to go to bed in the very early morning.. At 4 in the morning for example.

I just wonder if this paralysis could be a pre signal of some bad disease.. like multiple sclerosis or parkinson.. I eat paleo so no cereals, dairy, milk, legumes ect.. So i don't think that food can have a role.. Maybe my bad session of sleep can be the cause?

Hope someone can answer!

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on July 24, 2012
at 10:04 PM

I also have had experiences with hypnagogic sleep due to stress, in my 20's mostly. Yes, it's scary. The frequency did decrease with time and with taking better care of myself. Very rarely happens now, I'm in my 50's.

95b000345fd8880063ae6c39904e0732

(99)

on July 24, 2012
at 04:10 AM

This is true. Your body enters this paralysis during deep sleep for a very good reason. When you are dreaming, the parts of your brain that are active reflect what you are dreaming about. For instance, if you dream that you hear music, your auditory center lights up. Many many sleepmstudies have been done about this. If your body didn't become paralyzed, imagine what would happen if you were dreaming of running from a serial killer or dreaming of beating your spouse. Your waking up before your body is ready.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on July 24, 2012
at 02:58 AM

I grew out of it, too. It used to happen regularly, but I've only had a handful of episodes since my mid-20s.

5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on July 23, 2012
at 11:21 PM

About sleeping on your stomach, it can be bad for your cervical spine and what-not depending on how you go about it. That said, I definitely agree. Every time I have ever had sleep paralysis I have been sleeping on my back.

1407bd6152d9fdbc239250385159fea1

on July 23, 2012
at 06:40 PM

I like Karen's post, so I won't write my own. However, I would like to add on a completely unrelated note: You have a great name.

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11 Answers

8
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 23, 2012
at 03:42 PM

From this and your other post: You aren't eating enough. You aren't eating enough variety and are probably low on nutrients. You definitely aren't sleeping enough and you have messed up your circadian rhythm with your poor sleep schedule.

Don't go looking for something drastic like MS when a simple answer is right at hand. That way leads to hypochondria and even more stress than you probably already have from poor diet and sleep.

Sleep at least 8 hours a night. Start sleeping within a few hours after dark. Aim to wake up around dawn.

Eat enough. Eat enough variety.

Live clean. Manage your stress.

Added: Stop eating piles of chocolate. (from your other post) Eat more vegetables, especially green vegetables and eat some fruit if you aren't overweight.

4
724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on July 23, 2012
at 05:43 PM

Sleep paralysis is not a sign of a serious disorder, and it usually manifests in the teen years. Lack of sleep and a variable sleep schedule are among the triggers. http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/sleep-paralysis

The first line of treatment is to get your sleep hygiene in order by going to bed at a reasonable hour, preferably the same hour each night, and sleeping for a full 8 hours or more.

Your'e a teenager, though, so I don't know how likely you are to really do this - I guess it depends on how serious you are about trying to fix this sleep disorder.

Also try sleeping on your stomach. It can help.

I've experienced sleep paralysis a few times, and it's terrifying! Best of luck.

5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on July 23, 2012
at 11:21 PM

About sleeping on your stomach, it can be bad for your cervical spine and what-not depending on how you go about it. That said, I definitely agree. Every time I have ever had sleep paralysis I have been sleeping on my back.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 23, 2012
at 11:31 PM

Stress (especially emotional stress) and sleep deprivation both caused my my sleep paralysis. It is the scariest thing I've ever experienced, and had it quite a lot in my teens, with the last episode when I was in my early 20's. You'll most likely grow out of it.

It isn't a harbinger of a deeper illness, it is just a very powerful and frightening symptom of stress overload and hormone swings. I think I grew out of it if only because I became more jaded with age, and I developed enough perspective to weather relationship stress without turning into someone who couldn't sleep for days at a time.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on July 24, 2012
at 10:04 PM

I also have had experiences with hypnagogic sleep due to stress, in my 20's mostly. Yes, it's scary. The frequency did decrease with time and with taking better care of myself. Very rarely happens now, I'm in my 50's.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on July 24, 2012
at 02:58 AM

I grew out of it, too. It used to happen regularly, but I've only had a handful of episodes since my mid-20s.

1
Fc25b41326b954c4e5b8ce0dabb889a6

on July 23, 2012
at 04:14 PM

Matteo,

First off. You need more sleep because you're living inside a Cortisol bath. Try to go to sleep earlier and try new foods like beets and brightly colored vegetables. Secondly, your body produces a chemical when you enter sleep that concentrates enough during your period of deep sleep. About 3-5 hours in. It paralyzes you to keep you from sleep running/kicking/punching/walking. You are waking up during that period. It's natural to be paralyzed when you wake up during concentrated states of this chemical.

95b000345fd8880063ae6c39904e0732

(99)

on July 24, 2012
at 04:10 AM

This is true. Your body enters this paralysis during deep sleep for a very good reason. When you are dreaming, the parts of your brain that are active reflect what you are dreaming about. For instance, if you dream that you hear music, your auditory center lights up. Many many sleepmstudies have been done about this. If your body didn't become paralyzed, imagine what would happen if you were dreaming of running from a serial killer or dreaming of beating your spouse. Your waking up before your body is ready.

0
9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on August 09, 2012
at 01:38 AM

I had a few bouts of sleep paralysis in my teens and early twenties. This was before the internet was a fount of information, so I had no way to find out what was happening to me. I agree it is incredibly scary while it's happening. You lose all sense of time, you are in a panic, but you can't move or cry out. Very bizarre. Once I was fully out of it, however, i looked back on the episodes with more curiosity than trepidation.

But like others have said, it usually passes. I would not stress out that it indicates something dire going on. Hang in there.

0
193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

on August 08, 2012
at 09:22 PM

Per wikipedia (I know, I know):

Several circumstances have been identified that are associated with an increased risk of sleep paralysis. These include insomnia and sleep deprivation, an erratic sleep schedule, sleeping in the supine position, stress, overuse of stimulants, physical fatigue, as well as certain medications that are used to treat ADHD[2] . It is also believed that there may be a genetic component in the development of RISP due to a high concurrent incidence of sleep paralysis in monozygotic twins[8]. Sleeping in the supine position has been found to be an especially prominent instigator of sleep paralysis[16].

Sleeping in the supine position is believed to make the sleeper more vulnerable to episodes of sleep paralysis because in this sleeping position it is possible for the soft palate to collapse and obstruct the airway[16]. This is a possibility regardless of whether the individual has been diagnosed with sleep apnea or not. There may also be a greater rate of microarousals while sleeping in the supine position because there is a greater amount of pressure being exerted on the lungs by gravity when lying in the supine position[16].

While there are many factors that can increase your risk for ISP or RISP they are easily avoided with some minor lifestyle changes[5]. By maintaining a regular sleep schedule and observing good sleep hygiene you can drastically reduce your chances of experiencing sleep paralysis. It would also be advisable to reduce your intake of stimulants and attempt to reduce the stress in your daily life by taking up a hobby or seeing a trained psychologist that can give you coping mechanisms for stressful situations. Another very easy way to avoid sleep paralysis is to sleep on your side instead of in the supine position. There is a genetic factor involved is some cases of ISP and RISP which means that for some people sleep paralysis could be unavoidable despite taking all of the preventative measures mentioned above. By training yourself to remain calm during episodes you can lessen the impact that they have on your daily life and eventually you will be able to return to sleep much more quickly.

So from that I'd advice you to sleep on your side, focus on establishing a sleep schedule (and sticking to it), avoid any caffeine or other stimulants, and talk to your doctor about other options if you are on medication for ADHD. Beyond that, work to develop stress coping mechanisms (as they will reduce occurrences and their resulting stress levels) and a usable means to deal with the fear that they bring on.

These episodes are not know to link directly with any existing disease pathology, so don't worry about them being a harbinger of future disorders. If you do not work to correct the issue, however, the resultant stress and sleep deprivation can lead to trouble down the road, so don't completely ignore the issue.

0
D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on August 08, 2012
at 08:27 PM

Do you eat eggs? Eating egg whites disturbs my sleep, so I eat only the yolks.

0
5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on July 23, 2012
at 11:19 PM

I have had this on and off since I was a kid. It sucks and it's nerve-racking as **, but once it' s over it' s over. No need running around all day worrying about it. See a doc if you want but best case scenario they will tell you have anxiety, worse case they put you on something you don't need. Most docs will probably think you have a screw loose and that this doesn't even exist.

Sorry I cannot help more, but my experiences are so intermittent that I can't begin to track them. Also, you can train yourself to recognize when it happens and calm down. I try to stay calm and focus on picking my head up and then eventually I can move. You would think freaking the ** out would help, but it doesn't.

0
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on July 23, 2012
at 10:40 PM

Do you sleep on a "thick" pillow or multiple pillows?

Eat raw egg yolks daily for the choline.

0
985324c2c5566ae308f43f368f052b8b

on July 23, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Could this be sleep apnea? If so, take it seriously and see a doctor.

0
B45e940404bfbbc3d44acc3733fb26fa

on July 23, 2012
at 04:21 PM

thanks to you all! paleohacks is a the best site for healt in the web! thank thank thanks you're wonderful! I have the same problem!

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