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Religion and Paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 30, 2012 at 8:33 AM

I happen to be related to someone who was religious before turning Paleo.

Does anyone know of people who are religious and paleo, who happen to be indoctrinated yet logical?

Or have any stories regarding them both intertwined?

Accepted answer to best answer :) Thanks

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 01, 2013
at 03:05 PM

@Michael, not based on faith. We are a curious species, we like to discover things. We may not fully discover everything, and we can be misled, but that's the beauty of science, your goal as a scientist is to discover things, things that may overthrow previous knowledge, and you experiment repeatedly to test hypotheses. If it's not repeatable by others, it's not science. If it is and goes against something everyone else thought, congrats! Problems is when monied interests come in to put a spin on things for their own financial interest, everyone needs to have a manure detector.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on January 01, 2013
at 02:35 PM

That would work if the narratives didn't continually press on the difficult issues surrounding the fact Mary was pregnant and Joseph never slept with her. The translation could fit as "young maiden" that being not specifically virgin, but chaste. But even then you still have the issue of all the narrative being about Mary being pregnant outside of marriage, not to mention the communication from the Angel specifically explaining to them both why and how Mary is now pregnant despite not being with Joseph. The Bible rests on Jesus being born of a virgin. Drop that and lose God altogether.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on January 01, 2013
at 06:32 AM

I agree totally, just wondering what you thought after what you said about 'Paleo is based on science, not on unquestioning faith'. Inferred from that that you thought that science is based on an unequstioning faith in our ability to use it to uncover truths, 'the world out there' etc... I like your approach though, reminds me of critical approachs like those in political sociology and other areas. Follow the money a great axiom...

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on January 01, 2013
at 06:19 AM

valued in thought-proviing, exploratory questions (with 'arguments' piquing thoughts and responses)?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on January 01, 2013
at 06:17 AM

What exactly is wrong with this question? Cna anyone elaborate how it is 'subjective and argumentive'? How would i ask an objective question? As well questions often have arguments in them, whether put expliticlty or explitily. The quality of answersto this question have been stellar. Many are 'argumentative' but so many always are - everything is political. I daresay those answers are not in the tone which warrants being labelled 'argumentive', which often has connotations of negativity. What really is negative about the questions and the answers in the thread? Is there not something to be

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:45 AM

refrigeration is not required if you have a family (or tribe) large enough to eat, say a bison, or cow, fast enough and/or preserve the rest through smoking/drying. Hominids lived through two millions years with no electricity with just stone tools and fire. We only need the fridge because we use oil to transport meat to us and don't do our own hunting. Dietary laws were simply based on bellyache observation. Oh, I ate some oysters and I got sick, therefore, nobody anywhere should ever eat them, because I am king, and my word is law. I don't live like that. Why do you?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:41 AM

@thhq: learn the words cognitive dissonance. Apply the same rules to everything in your life. If you question one, question the other. Then, the answers will show themselves when you think about it, there won't be any contradictions left. Paleo diets were never about historical re-enactments. I have no trouble sitting infront of a computer hooked up to a high speed internet connection talking about the paleolithic and eating similar to what my ancestors ate, because I seek to emulate their diet, not life style. They ate "paleo" not by choice, but because that was the only food available.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:39 AM

@thhq: learn the words cognitive dissonance. Apply the same rules to everything in your life. If you question one, question the other. Then, the answers will show themselves when you think about it, there won't be any contradictions left. Paleo diets were never about historical re-enactments. I have no trouble sitting infront of a computer hooked up to a high speed internet connection talking about the paleolithic and eating similar to what my ancestors ate, because I seek to emulate their life style. Remember, they ate "paleo" not by choice, but because that was the only food available.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:36 AM

There's a simple solution: do not allow cognitive dissonance in any aspect of your life. Treat everything with the same set of rules. If you question one, question all.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:35 AM

And don't forget how much is lost in the multiple layers of translations and culture between the actual meaning in the original text and the modern reinterpreted version. i.e. the whole Mary as a virgin thing vs the original meaning of unmarried.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:30 AM

@Michael, I never said faith in science. Even scientific studies cannot be trusted, and can be tainted by whomever funds them. Take a look at studies of drugs by big pharma vs studies of the same drug by independent parties - there's always a huge visible difference. Question even "science" where ever possible, and do follow the money even there.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:28 AM

@thhq in my case northstarbison and uswellnessmeats profit when I eat meat, as do I, since I make very good use of the micronutients, as well as the delicious protein and fats.

7bcdcce584eb132e4c06b8ad2b1d22cc

(644)

on December 31, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Wouldn't a Calvinist be 5 points?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 30, 2012
at 07:00 PM

I loved this answer. I agreed on so many aspects. +1

F12658db6c0bf63b1541a16ee6078a4f

(90)

on December 30, 2012
at 06:46 PM

I agree. I consider myself a Christian (though I don't go currently attend church). I also believe in evolution. I believe the Bible is symbolic, not literal.I believe God set things in motion for things to evolve the way they did, not "poof, here are birds! poof, here are humans!" and that "1 day" wasn't a day but millions of years. The Bible may have been inspired by God, but was written by Man; therefore they would write it in a way they understood things to be, including simplifications and biases of the time.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on December 30, 2012
at 04:33 PM

faith in science...?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:40 PM

The New Testament goes out of its way to discourage people from following Hebrew dietary laws, and to act like an omnivore. This is a problem for paleo purists who base their quasi-religious faith on new food lists. For health, paleo has some great benefits, but eating a perfect health diet requires that you be rich enough to afford it. Neither the poor nor our ancestors had to deal with the problem of hyperabundant food.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:32 PM

Dietary laws used to have useful foundations. I've eaten Med coast oysters raw out of season and the results were not pleasant. But since the dawn of the refrigeration age, food safety has greatly improved. Our faith in the power of refrigeration is the cornerstone of modern specialist diets like rawism and paleo.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:15 PM

And like any good Calvinist preacher you used 4 points. You're way overthinking this. How far have you travelled today on foot out hunting and gathering?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:11 PM

Not all paleos are pietists about their food-faith, but many rigidly confine their faith into lifestyles that are the antithesis of ancestral.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:05 PM

And who does it benefit if you eat meat? The Hebrew God loves the smell of burning meat, yet someone else loves the profits.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:02 PM

In its worst manifestations paleo is its own religion. You speak that way about conversions to paleo. There is a holy paleo canon for those who want silliness instead of settling for useful hacks.

75e8ceee00e2459860ea38220a3a8118

(276)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:49 PM

Yeah, it's logical to me that a creator would provide a food supply that's compatible for us, so the whole natural unprocessed food thing is a huge part of why I eat paleo.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Nice. I like the following the money thing.

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12 Answers

6
9d88d34b9d9cd0024414107fb1284717

(60)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:21 PM

I am a Christian, I did not come from a religious family. I did graduate from a Christian College with a degree in Cross Cultural Studies.

I am new to Paleo, but wanted to chime in on the religious perspective.

It's not uncommon at all to find Christians that embrace evolution. Many like myself know the bible to be largely allegorical, and have no problem with "Old Earth" and and identifying God as the source of life. Christianity can and should embrace science in the search of truth, and science shouldn't be afraid to point out things that may challenge the religious status quo.

I don't wish to debate anyone who disagrees, I'm know very well that I'm not going to try to change your mind, and you wont change mine... but am happy to engage in discussion.

In short, I have not seen anything in the Paleo Diet and philosophy that concerns my faith.

F12658db6c0bf63b1541a16ee6078a4f

(90)

on December 30, 2012
at 06:46 PM

I agree. I consider myself a Christian (though I don't go currently attend church). I also believe in evolution. I believe the Bible is symbolic, not literal.I believe God set things in motion for things to evolve the way they did, not "poof, here are birds! poof, here are humans!" and that "1 day" wasn't a day but millions of years. The Bible may have been inspired by God, but was written by Man; therefore they would write it in a way they understood things to be, including simplifications and biases of the time.

6
8dbe73235f73c615f20d3d0f34b4852a

(1365)

on December 30, 2012
at 09:54 AM

Oh man you just opened a can o' worms...

All the people that I've helped transition to Paleo are quite secular. One is an ex-Mormon (cured her PCOS in two weeks on Paleo after 8 years with doctors). One is an atheist born to a Catholic family (Started Jan 1st 2012 -- has lost 160 lbs so far). A smattering of others.

There are plenty of people that are religious/indoctrinated and yet logical under any other circumstance. In fact, this is largely why I find religion so frustrating. Why do we allow faith-based reasoning when it comes to morality/afterlife/unknowns? Why are these concepts magically accepted based on faith merely because we call them religion?

But this isn't a thread on religious wacky-doo. You may end up with a more secular crowd in the Paleo world because:

  1. Part of the reasoning for it includes evolution

  2. Prior to making the switch to Paleo, many are skeptical of current medical/nutrition advice and may be generally skeptical and critical people otherwise. We don't just follow doctors'(Father's) orders. We go read, and search, and weigh options, and TRY. There are VERY few people that try each religion for a month and then go stick with the one that works best. It's a complete guess, but if one is not indoctrinated from childhood, I would bet that they wouldn't really end up totally buying into any of them by the end of their trials.

  3. Similar to the idea of number 2, those that are in a religion tend to continue time and again to search THAT religion for answers to questions that may or may not lie within that religion. Analogously, they may, like all those people running on a treadmill doing their cardio, keep looking back through their failed system over and over and just say "I'm just not doing it right. I must not be interpreting the words right. keep going at it."

  4. As Chuck points out, many religions speak to the food their minions should eat.

I'd be interested to hear from religious people (especially those with inflammation/autoimmune problems) regarding why they do or do not follow the dietary guidelines of their faith. If they DO follow them, then I'd ask them to try Paleo and see how they do (cow/pork/oysters?), and if they improve, ask them how that makes them feel about their faith. There have been several posts here in PH about fasting (for the sake of one's religion) and how to best approach it on a Paleo diet (calorie intake after sun-down, food types, etc).

And then there's the part of me that just wants to point out that they are, by almost any clinical definition (were it not labeled "religion"), BNBS crazy and just move on with my life and go have some bacon-wrapped shellfish. Without a side of unleavened bread.

Bring on the "intolerance" and "just live and let live, man" haters. Peace and Love. And puppies shitting rainbows (because their feed doesn't have grains in it).

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:15 PM

And like any good Calvinist preacher you used 4 points. You're way overthinking this. How far have you travelled today on foot out hunting and gathering?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:02 PM

In its worst manifestations paleo is its own religion. You speak that way about conversions to paleo. There is a holy paleo canon for those who want silliness instead of settling for useful hacks.

7bcdcce584eb132e4c06b8ad2b1d22cc

(644)

on December 31, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Wouldn't a Calvinist be 5 points?

4
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:13 PM

Such a person would need to have ignored questioning everything in their lives, or thought it was ok to not question somethings, but question others.

In my world view, I always ask, "Whom does this benefit?" and the answer is generally hidden, but enlightening.

Whom does it benefit that I eat grains? A very clear answer if you follow the money.

Whom does it benefit if I consume these prescribed drugs? Yet, another very clear answer if you follow the money.

Whom does it benefit if I we go to war? Yet another.

Whom does it benefit if I follow the teachings of X, visit his/her/its church/temple, and donate my time/money to their cause? Yet another.

Whom does it benefit if I send out variants of "Happy Holidays" cards and gifts to others? Certainly giving gifts and thinking of others is something that benefits me, as it is human nature to view those who bestow gifts onto others as generous and kind, and it benefits those who receive them, if they happen to be wanted, but perhaps it mostly benefits those who sell them.

Whom does it benefit if I obey authority, or seeming authority on TV programs in the area of X, Y, or Z? Possibly me if they happen to be right, but perhaps those authorities are funded by corporations U, V and W, whose products I might directly, or indirectly purchase if I follow such advice, and certainly the producers of such programs P, Q, R, S and T, who get paid in advertising fees. Then again, perhaps such products are really detrimental to me and I'm just another sucker being separated of my health and money...

There are always benefits in both direction, but sometimes, the benefits to me are far less.

If your religion prevents you from asking and challenging, you might literally be a sheep. A benefactor deity would not require money, would not require absolute obedience without question. So, if you're not allowed to ask the question, you're perhaps being deluded.

Certain secular fraternal organizations require that you believe that there is a higher being than you that knows more than you and is beneficial to you. This too begs the question of why? If that is the premise, than perhaps it benefits those in the center of the inner circle who demand such beliefs, so that they may place themselves "At God's Ear" or "Chosen by God" for whatever purpose, and how dare you question their requests from a lowly member such as yourself? And such is born the path of blind obedience, to the benefit of charlatans.

[Here's a hint, they've analyzed all world religions and distilled down that which is common at their core, so that they may present it to you as parlor tricks. Each believer of each different path will recognize the message, and believe that their leader has been divinely chosen, and thus ensnared.]

Perhaps the message in whatever book you follow is a positive one, but those who would thump on it, and claim to be of the source of such a book are not really what they wish you to believe, and have their own agendas.

Question, and you may find the truth, and this message will be one of wisdom. Blindly follow, and you may find this message a source of pure evil. Your choice.

Back to science. Paleo is based on science, not on unquestioning faith. Those who follow science would tend to question everything. So you're likely to find those who are paleo are less likely to be very focused on religion, and more likely to follow it as a tradition, rather than as a blind belief.

There are many positive aspects to a religion from a socio-familial-economic-cultural point. Those who are members are seen as family, and it's likely that whole families are members, and have a vested interest in following the same traditions as other families. This can be a great support network for those in need, and can provide an outlet for those generous and well off. To help another human being in need is a great reward.

But this also creates barriers between people, "they are not like us, they believe in the same god, but they don't agree with us on this one minor point, so let's wage war on them, rape and pillage and burn them." And thus, people can be manipulated into even going against what their good book says, because some lusty king wanted a divorce, or because someone was greedy and wanted to conquer others.

Ask, whom does it benefit, and you'll understand. Don't, follow blindly, and you may find yourself, and your children dying in wars to enrich others.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:28 AM

@thhq in my case northstarbison and uswellnessmeats profit when I eat meat, as do I, since I make very good use of the micronutients, as well as the delicious protein and fats.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:05 PM

And who does it benefit if you eat meat? The Hebrew God loves the smell of burning meat, yet someone else loves the profits.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:30 AM

@Michael, I never said faith in science. Even scientific studies cannot be trusted, and can be tainted by whomever funds them. Take a look at studies of drugs by big pharma vs studies of the same drug by independent parties - there's always a huge visible difference. Question even "science" where ever possible, and do follow the money even there.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on December 30, 2012
at 04:33 PM

faith in science...?

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Nice. I like the following the money thing.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 30, 2012
at 07:00 PM

I loved this answer. I agreed on so many aspects. +1

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on January 01, 2013
at 06:32 AM

I agree totally, just wondering what you thought after what you said about 'Paleo is based on science, not on unquestioning faith'. Inferred from that that you thought that science is based on an unequstioning faith in our ability to use it to uncover truths, 'the world out there' etc... I like your approach though, reminds me of critical approachs like those in political sociology and other areas. Follow the money a great axiom...

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 01, 2013
at 03:05 PM

@Michael, not based on faith. We are a curious species, we like to discover things. We may not fully discover everything, and we can be misled, but that's the beauty of science, your goal as a scientist is to discover things, things that may overthrow previous knowledge, and you experiment repeatedly to test hypotheses. If it's not repeatable by others, it's not science. If it is and goes against something everyone else thought, congrats! Problems is when monied interests come in to put a spin on things for their own financial interest, everyone needs to have a manure detector.

3
75e8ceee00e2459860ea38220a3a8118

on December 30, 2012
at 02:10 PM

Yes. Some friends and I encounter no conflict between our faith (in Jesus) and eating paleo, and I'm privileged to know a plethora of people who are "indoctrinated yet logical". :)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:40 PM

The New Testament goes out of its way to discourage people from following Hebrew dietary laws, and to act like an omnivore. This is a problem for paleo purists who base their quasi-religious faith on new food lists. For health, paleo has some great benefits, but eating a perfect health diet requires that you be rich enough to afford it. Neither the poor nor our ancestors had to deal with the problem of hyperabundant food.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:36 AM

There's a simple solution: do not allow cognitive dissonance in any aspect of your life. Treat everything with the same set of rules. If you question one, question all.

3
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:09 PM

This topic will probably be closed, but just to say that the second reason I am a Christian (Reformed/Augustinian) is due its rigorous logical grounding.

I.e. You can debunk the entire existence of God if you can prove that the Hebrews were never captive in Egypt. Why? Because the entire thread of the Tanakh is the faithfulness of YAHWEH and his communication with his people of the truth that he brought them out of Egypt because of his promise to Abraham. This very same thread runs all the way through the New Testament and who and why Jesus was and is who he said he was and is.

Anyway this is just one example. But in the case of food. I would be careful of missing the context of the Hebrew dietary laws which were about holiness and separation primarily. I.e. manna and quail provided by YAHWEH does not translate directly into a food template.

In the case of the Bible you have to ask "What was the author trying to communicate specifically." and what was the context, context, context.

In the case of Christianity in the scope of religions. It is not a balloon that will pop if you press too hard philosophically, logically or Scientifically. People in general make a lot of 'tabloid' assumptions and don't do any intellectual critical study. But who can blame them, people base their reason to pursue something on the basis of their previous assumptions. Much like most of us never questioning our 'healthy' diets of whole-grains and low fat before something sparked our critical thinking and set us off really looking hard into things.

Anyway good place to start and from one of the most intellectual thinkers around today: http://www.ligonier.org/learn/series/

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:35 AM

And don't forget how much is lost in the multiple layers of translations and culture between the actual meaning in the original text and the modern reinterpreted version. i.e. the whole Mary as a virgin thing vs the original meaning of unmarried.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on January 01, 2013
at 02:35 PM

That would work if the narratives didn't continually press on the difficult issues surrounding the fact Mary was pregnant and Joseph never slept with her. The translation could fit as "young maiden" that being not specifically virgin, but chaste. But even then you still have the issue of all the narrative being about Mary being pregnant outside of marriage, not to mention the communication from the Angel specifically explaining to them both why and how Mary is now pregnant despite not being with Joseph. The Bible rests on Jesus being born of a virgin. Drop that and lose God altogether.

3
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:04 PM

I'm paleo for logical reasons and while I don't attend church regularly I'd still consider myself religious in the sense that maybe we were created by a divine spark of creativity not 3,000 years ago but like 15billion years ago or something. That's just my opinion though.

3
F54a16e4caf4dc8da9ef1369f46a95cd

(591)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:02 PM

I don't think they're mutually exclusive. I think I've run across a few Paleo blogs where the family is religious. And it makes some amount of sense to me if they are looking at it as eating the whole natural unprocessed food god gave them, and then, I suppose, ignoring the cavemen aspect of it.

75e8ceee00e2459860ea38220a3a8118

(276)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:49 PM

Yeah, it's logical to me that a creator would provide a food supply that's compatible for us, so the whole natural unprocessed food thing is a huge part of why I eat paleo.

2
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:20 PM

If you can believe in invisible sky fairies, believing that neolithic foods are bad for you shouldn't be too much of a stretch.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:11 PM

Not all paleos are pietists about their food-faith, but many rigidly confine their faith into lifestyles that are the antithesis of ancestral.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:39 AM

@thhq: learn the words cognitive dissonance. Apply the same rules to everything in your life. If you question one, question the other. Then, the answers will show themselves when you think about it, there won't be any contradictions left. Paleo diets were never about historical re-enactments. I have no trouble sitting infront of a computer hooked up to a high speed internet connection talking about the paleolithic and eating similar to what my ancestors ate, because I seek to emulate their life style. Remember, they ate "paleo" not by choice, but because that was the only food available.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:41 AM

@thhq: learn the words cognitive dissonance. Apply the same rules to everything in your life. If you question one, question the other. Then, the answers will show themselves when you think about it, there won't be any contradictions left. Paleo diets were never about historical re-enactments. I have no trouble sitting infront of a computer hooked up to a high speed internet connection talking about the paleolithic and eating similar to what my ancestors ate, because I seek to emulate their diet, not life style. They ate "paleo" not by choice, but because that was the only food available.

2
5c880a6a32f9ffb0db5ee56e9b699940

(175)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:00 PM

I know plenty of people that are good christians and paleo. What is the purpose of the question? Do you need specific help related to this topic. Let me know

1
0219fa194c33e06928253fd0ce5032c2

(100)

on December 31, 2012
at 09:11 PM

I am an evangelical Christian and just recently got into the Paleo diet.

First of all, I do believe in evolution, but that's not what I want to discuss here..

I believe that God created us to live well, and that isn't just about being "spiritual" and going to church and praying. Tim Keller (in Prodigal God) talks about Christianity being perhaps the most "materialistic" of all religions. What he means is that the Christian hope is very earthy -- Christians (if they have their theology straight) do not believe that when we die, our souls float up to heaven and we live in disembodied bliss forever. The end hope is the resurrection of the dead. This means that heaven, eventually, will be on Earth (though it will be radically renewed), and those who are saved from God's judgment will live in bodies forever. In Revelation, Heaven is depicted as a wedding feast. You could write books (and they have been written) on the importance of food and feasting in the Bible.

So what's the relevance of that to Paleo? It means that, according to Christianity, what we do with our bodies matters. We were created to live on Earth, in harmony with our Creator, with others, and with the material creation. A lot of "food" that people eat today is an aberration. In my view, the mere existence of fast food and most of the garbage you can buy at grocery stories is a sign of spiritual decay. We want the cheapest food with the sweetest taste, regardless of how artificial it is, because we love money and we love very temporary pleasure.

So in short, for me as a Christian, what I eat has everything to do with my faith in Christ.

1
3089dd0b9a8f1d24f1b08d6cc3ca84e3

(363)

on December 30, 2012
at 09:17 AM

Its very rare . Especially in the Jewish Religion as they eat a Torah diet which grains are their main food source and it shows on them . Lots of them are severely overweight . The bible promotes a High Carb Lowfat diet , everything was always remove the fat and burn it . Never base nutrition off of biblical advice , we must always base nutrition off of scientific proven advice .

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 30, 2012
at 03:32 PM

Dietary laws used to have useful foundations. I've eaten Med coast oysters raw out of season and the results were not pleasant. But since the dawn of the refrigeration age, food safety has greatly improved. Our faith in the power of refrigeration is the cornerstone of modern specialist diets like rawism and paleo.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:45 AM

refrigeration is not required if you have a family (or tribe) large enough to eat, say a bison, or cow, fast enough and/or preserve the rest through smoking/drying. Hominids lived through two millions years with no electricity with just stone tools and fire. We only need the fridge because we use oil to transport meat to us and don't do our own hunting. Dietary laws were simply based on bellyache observation. Oh, I ate some oysters and I got sick, therefore, nobody anywhere should ever eat them, because I am king, and my word is law. I don't live like that. Why do you?

0
Bbae431256192d2c57ba2a2122d12cd3

(84)

on December 30, 2012
at 01:37 PM

I live in israel, and I can say you're totally right.

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