5

votes

Rebranding Paleo

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 30, 2010 at 4:57 AM

Robb Wolf touched on this during his show last week, and it's something I've been thinking about for a while. There is something inherently unappealing about paleo. This is aside from the strict dietary restriction. Yeah, giving up bagels is difficult, and life without beer is virtually pointless.

But the concept of paleo seems to present itself as a barrier in and of itself, making what to many is an already unappealing concept sound even worse. Perhaps, it's the phrase "the caveman diet." It does make me feel like I should wear a loin cloth. Perhaps it's the perception of needing to become Luddite. Going paleo should mean making major lifestyles changes. Yes. Go to bed earlier dammit. Ditch all that boxed food. Don't eat those cookies the co-worker brought in (I did this weekend, and it didn't feel so nice later that night). But it seems to me that too much identity is put into being paleo. People want to become healthy, so they can enjoy and put more energy into doing the things they love to do. That's the reason for all this. The other things matter, so I want to go paleo. But in a way "going paleo" sounds like I'm going to need to change everything. I'm not sure why, but it sounds more intensive than "dialing back on grains and beans, getting more sleep and exercising in a thoughtful manner." How do we make paleo attractive to the world? How do we make people want to become healthy in a way that corresponds to the reality, evolutionary biology and biochemistry? The Paleo diet is rooted in compelling science, but that science means nothing if it doesn't compel people to action. Is it as simple as changing the name from paleo, or does a more robust motivational re-branding need to be done?

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I've been brainstorming a few ideas... How about... Primal, NeanderThin, The Evolution Diet, The New Evolution Diet, The Stone Age Diet, or The Original Diet? ;)

A82d8cbea04392ebcb1a819bddc4a259

(190)

on September 05, 2011
at 01:55 AM

Agreed, awareness is key.

3c04e97f68c270d7a03861e2daf75f68

(40)

on December 01, 2010
at 11:37 PM

I think I'm with you on this. If the people such as yourself who choose to stand up and lead others into better health need to call it something else, so be it, as long as the concept isn't diluted. I couldn't really give a rats ass what other people eat but more power to you for fighting to help others achieve their goals and live a little better.

3c04e97f68c270d7a03861e2daf75f68

(40)

on December 01, 2010
at 11:23 PM

Maybe I didn't listen as carefully as you but I didn't get that impression at all from the Robb Wolf discussion. I think he's just passionate about taking it to the masses and that the paleo tag makes it less acceptable to the people who need it most. I also quite like the primal, animalistic connotations after bein' a vegetarian so long but this is exactly why we don't need convincing. We're the marginal ones. In a world where most people want and kinda need leaders, Robb is doing a great job and I'll happily give up the paleo moniker if it means people are able to get involved.

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on December 01, 2010
at 03:26 AM

I think I like the "caveman" idea conceptually... when it's in my own head. However, the misogynistic social connotations attached to the stereotype make it less appealing. That and, as I wrote a couple days ago, I don't think cave dwelling was every a reliable habitation strategy for a significant number of humans. Regarding your edit: A-men brother! The capitulation of science has been lame for centuries; capitulation for marketing purposes seems doubly so.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 01, 2010
at 01:45 AM

It is fun. I have a t-shirt that says: "Meat. Fire. Good." Sometimes I tell people I'm on a high saturated fat diet, just to freak them out. But when I'm serious, I tell them its not reenactment, its using the idea of what they ate to replicate a healthy diet here and now. But I fantasize about going outside with nothing but a rock and a stick and trying to survive. (LOL - I wouldn't last 2 days!)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 01, 2010
at 01:41 AM

Just had to say that I really enjoyed reading this.

Cf1189fc2e0acdd49ce566e43238ffb6

on November 30, 2010
at 10:45 PM

yea I like to refer to it as paleolithic or evolutionary nutrition or lifestyle, people put too many bad connotations on the word diet.

Cf1189fc2e0acdd49ce566e43238ffb6

on November 30, 2010
at 10:41 PM

I couldn't agree more!

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on November 30, 2010
at 08:50 PM

"Post-modern science" is an oxymoron. If it's post-modern, it ain't science.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on November 30, 2010
at 07:17 PM

I wish I had some Paleo friends to talk to and share food with and workout with. I can't even find a near enough Crossfit gym to go. I workout by myself, but it's really so much more fun with people with the same goals!

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:37 PM

Shouldn't paleo grow even more? It could bring world peace... [you can guess my face]

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:13 PM

So, basically, you agree with me. ... But I think it's funny how all the people in New York have a "group" or "circle" of paleo friends. You guys are totally spoiled. [Smiley face.] The rest of us are out here feeling like outcasts ...

154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on November 30, 2010
at 03:06 PM

I agree with how important it is to keep the scientific underpinnings explicit. I've never been interested in diets or nutrition before, since I always thought I ate healthy. When I started investigating the reason for my increasing tiredness the fact that it was called paleo made immediate sense to me as it slots right into my current framework of knowledge. If it had been given some kind of fancy name I would have skipped past it.

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on November 30, 2010
at 06:53 AM

I was behind on my Robb Wolf podcast listening and just played the episode in question. The "rebranding" bit is discussed in episode 55 at about 31:00. Robb specifically mentions the religious pushback as well. Classic line: "I'll throw out there that it's usually the smarter people buy into it initially..."

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:52 AM

So true, none of *us* is interested in wearing loincloths, but others might have that perception. Or more specifically: others think it's funny. I can't tell you how many times an acquaintance has said: but would Paleolithic man have used a computer? I don't think I've ever gotten annoyed and I just say really quickly that it's about making your body healthier, it's a metabolic thing, etc. Seriously I think the first NYT article had a fair amount to do with it; everyone seems to have that image of bearded John Durant running barefoot on a cold winter morning. Damn journalists.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:45 AM

Sounds right to me.

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on November 30, 2010
at 06:37 AM

Ha! Yeah... I wouldn't have gone there but the other Andrew mentioned his postmodern view of science in the comments under the OP.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:30 AM

"simulacra obfuscating" Wow, had to look that one up. lol

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:19 AM

You make good arguments in your first paragraph and I reallly can't disagree with anything you wrote. And when it comes down to it, we're probably doing the same thing - leading by example, doing/seeking the best for ourselves, informing people of "why" when they ask in the hopes that some might catch on.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:35 AM

Then let's call it something else, say, "marketing" or "advertising".

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:26 AM

I hold a very post-modern view of science which ends up being frustrating to must people and very much off topic. Another day, sir.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:22 AM

I strongly disagree with this phrase: *"...science means nothing if it doesn't compel people to action."* What do you think "science" is?

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:02 AM

as a former beer aficionado i can tell you that nothing will make me go back after Paleo cured the rampant case of the trots i've had for the last 20 odd years. life after beer is good. much less pointless than sitting on the toilet all the time.

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15 Answers

8
630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on November 30, 2010
at 06:24 AM

I chugged along happily for about 18 months referring to the diet as "paleo" after discovering it through Joe Friel's book, 'The Triathlete's Training Bible". The "paleolithic" part made it make sense almost immediately. It was so obvious from an evolutionary biology angle that I felt stupid for not thinking of it myself. The only people who didn't approve of the "paleo" part were creationists who deny that the paleolithic era occurred.

I never made any mental connections to "cavemen" or Vibram Five Fingers until I started getting involved with the online paleosphere. If you want to get all postmodern philosophical about it, you might start with analyzing whether the online community exists as simulacra obfuscating the underlying reality.

For me, it's about the Darwinian principles and the paleolithic/Pleistocene concepts fit with that much more than "caveman" or other abstractions. And from the evolutionary perspective, it does dovetail into a bunch of other things. I'm wary of anyone who tries to take the "paleo" out of paleo because the logical framework of evolution begins to get lost.

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on November 30, 2010
at 06:37 AM

Ha! Yeah... I wouldn't have gone there but the other Andrew mentioned his postmodern view of science in the comments under the OP.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:30 AM

"simulacra obfuscating" Wow, had to look that one up. lol

154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on November 30, 2010
at 03:06 PM

I agree with how important it is to keep the scientific underpinnings explicit. I've never been interested in diets or nutrition before, since I always thought I ate healthy. When I started investigating the reason for my increasing tiredness the fact that it was called paleo made immediate sense to me as it slots right into my current framework of knowledge. If it had been given some kind of fancy name I would have skipped past it.

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on November 30, 2010
at 06:53 AM

I was behind on my Robb Wolf podcast listening and just played the episode in question. The "rebranding" bit is discussed in episode 55 at about 31:00. Robb specifically mentions the religious pushback as well. Classic line: "I'll throw out there that it's usually the smarter people buy into it initially..."

6
7d5d98a0453db2ae67358a3169888aca

on November 30, 2010
at 06:21 AM

Where do you get the perception that you need to become a Luddite? I've yet to see any paleo authors/bloggers lean in that direction, and considering that we're using the internet right now to have this discussion I don't see a strong Luddite tendency at all. True, the name seems to lead to some people interpreting it as a "reenactment diet" (I've seen a few questions on here that seem to be more about reenactment than anything else) but I think that's a case of misinterpretation at the users end, and it's hard to prevent that with any kind of diet or lifestyle.

I also don't think "paleo" needs re-branding because "paleo" isn't a single, monolithic entity yet. It's a set of dietary, exercise, and in some cases lifestyle principles with a lot of room for personalization and experimentation; look at the endless discussions over dairy, fructose, root vegetables, and carbs in general.

If you feel the need to market paleo on a personal level just explain it simply when asked about it, and maybe offer a basic introductory website related to your personal variety of paleo lifestyle. After that it's up the individual to decide, even a new name won't change that.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:52 AM

So true, none of *us* is interested in wearing loincloths, but others might have that perception. Or more specifically: others think it's funny. I can't tell you how many times an acquaintance has said: but would Paleolithic man have used a computer? I don't think I've ever gotten annoyed and I just say really quickly that it's about making your body healthier, it's a metabolic thing, etc. Seriously I think the first NYT article had a fair amount to do with it; everyone seems to have that image of bearded John Durant running barefoot on a cold winter morning. Damn journalists.

5
166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on November 30, 2010
at 11:28 AM

Back when I was "pescetarian" (that still sounds ridiculous, so 'a vegetarian who eats fish'), I heard of something called 'the stone age diet' and scoffed. Firstly, I wasn't too keen on meat, and secondly, it sounded somewhat ridiculous. Yet, as with vegetarianism and its many offshoots (lacto-ovo, vegan and so on) or halal, celiac and all the other myriad eating patterns that people follow, it is helpful to have an umbrella term under which to gather the main tenets. However, unlike most of those dietary patterns, bar celiac, it is driven by health concerns rather than the adherence to an ethical and/or religious ideal. This makes the "rules" somewhat shifting, if not non-existent, and will obviously be cause for confusion for anyone who hasn't tried it. In fact, I find it much easier to define by exclusion of what the paleo diet excludes: refined sugar, grains, legumes, vegetable oils and trans-fats, dairy (although the latter seems most often compromised on).

Unfortunately, as with vegetarianism, claiming to follow a 'paleo' diet brings up all kinds of questions, criticisms and interrogations. The skeptical are most likely to point out that we have no idea what mankind ate thousands of years ago, and both the specific type and variety of plants and animals either no longer exist or are not easily accessible. This is true- which is why, as Andrew said above, emphasising the maintenance of a paleo-like metabolism is more important than eating supposedly 'paleo' foods. On a side-note, I find the longer I do this, the more interested I am in replicating traditional eating patterns that encompassed nose-to-tail eating, whole fish (eg organs, innards, bones of the smaller ones) and even, what the hell, insects. I hope that one of the positive effects of paleo is to get more people eating organ meats and being more economical with animals (go Joel Salatin and integrative farming). But when members of the paleo community try to replicate other aspects of the 'caveman lifestyle'- eg bare foot running across sand after a 24 hour fast, ending with a barbeque of raw meat- I think it is likely to look somewhat ridiculous to the majority of people, who will then sneer at dropping their donuts and binning their bread because of those connotations.

That said, I think it's too late in the day to change the branding. As with vegetarianism (third mention here, I apologize), there is a huge breadth and variety to 'paleo diets', from those who eat exclusively meat to those who use lots of nut butters, almond flour cakes and protein shakes. You can't control how others eat or exercise, and therefore whatever they do under the name of 'paleo' is likely to influence the questions and criticisms you receive for following the diet, lifestyle and so on. Like it or not, I think it's best to simply explain to people what you personally do and why, referring to evolutionary principles, rather than letting them trot off to the internet and discover, aghast, that you are a fan of rotting meat.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 01, 2010
at 01:41 AM

Just had to say that I really enjoyed reading this.

5
Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:11 AM

"How do we make paleo attractive to the world? How do we make people want to become healthy in a way that corresponds to the reality evolutionary biology and biochemistry? The Paleo diet is routed in compelling science but that science means nothing if it doesn't compel people to action. Is it as simple as changing the name from paleo or does a more robust motivational re-branding need to be done?

How? Lead by example, offer your knowledge when it's solicited. A person won't change who isn't willing to change, so why should we feel the burden of "compelling people into action"? Every person is responsible for their own health and well-being. If they choose not to change for the better, does it make a difference in how I will live my life? Not really. I've lead by example at home. My husband now follows a stricter paleo diet than I do. My children are paleo at home and at least one tries hard when we eat out. Exercise/fitness has always been an integral part of my life and my husband's and we've tried to instill that in our children. Obviously as parents we have a responsibility to our children and maybe other loved ones, but not really to anyone else. just my humble opinion.

4
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on November 30, 2010
at 04:55 PM

Eh, I don't really care about paleo growing that much. It's grown enough that I have a sufficient number of paleo friends and people to do stuff with. But any more and it might make meat expensive :)

I do want to see whole foods in schools/grocery stores/restaurants, but I'm not interested in pushing paleo as some kind of worldwide solution.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 05:13 PM

So, basically, you agree with me. ... But I think it's funny how all the people in New York have a "group" or "circle" of paleo friends. You guys are totally spoiled. [Smiley face.] The rest of us are out here feeling like outcasts ...

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on November 30, 2010
at 07:17 PM

I wish I had some Paleo friends to talk to and share food with and workout with. I can't even find a near enough Crossfit gym to go. I workout by myself, but it's really so much more fun with people with the same goals!

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:37 PM

Shouldn't paleo grow even more? It could bring world peace... [you can guess my face]

4
Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on November 30, 2010
at 01:46 PM

Re-branding is for brands, not ideas. The entire concept of re-branding a simple, good idea just seems silly to me.

My motivation is to have a better life. I don't really care what others do, I'm not out to convince the world.

3
47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:08 AM

Response to W8liftinmom (and Andrew too): Why should we care about other people other than the ones we love? Well, if we're just going from self-interest, it benefits me quite a bit (and the people I love too) if paleo options are more widely available: both in restaurants and in grocery stores. So it behooves me to engage in a certain amount of paleo "evangelism," because the more the word gets out there the easier my life will be.

But we wouldn't want it to get out there too quickly: if everyone in the United States (just to pick a country) switched over to paleo tomorrow we would have some big problems satisfying their demands for pastured meat and butter. Leaving aside the question of whether or not the earth can support six billion people eating paleo, there is still the question of making the transition. I'm sure Melissa or someone else who knows a lot about agriculture could say more about this, but I think it's safe to say that there will be a transition period in converting our farms from dead-end wheat and corn production to grass-based sustainability.

But, since there's pretty much no real possibility that the majority or even 20% of the United States will switch anytime soon, I think I can safely spread the word with as much energy as I care to dedicate to the endeavor. I think a reasonable goal would be to get paleo to the point where restaurants and grocery stores understand what it is, and sooner rather than later. I don't want to be thought a freak for making special demands in restaurants. And I want to see more real food on menus: big stews of meat and veggies and fatty goodness, instead of sandwiches and pasta. The well-being of the earth and the people on it are important also, but this is my more immediate goal.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:19 AM

You make good arguments in your first paragraph and I reallly can't disagree with anything you wrote. And when it comes down to it, we're probably doing the same thing - leading by example, doing/seeking the best for ourselves, informing people of "why" when they ask in the hopes that some might catch on.

Cf1189fc2e0acdd49ce566e43238ffb6

on November 30, 2010
at 10:41 PM

I couldn't agree more!

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 30, 2010
at 06:45 AM

Sounds right to me.

2
Dd017a9b1f2d6a9c220859f780da09c5

on December 01, 2010
at 04:41 AM

About the growth/spread of paleo - I feel that the more people know about it, the better. And not just for the self-interest of making my life easier (although that is definitely a very nice bonus). But I genuinely feel for all the people struggling with their health. Admittedly, I feel a little less bad for those that inhale twinkies and fast food regularly. But I'm more referring to those that are doing their best, living by the rules of conventional "healthy eating." I wish that paleo was more mainstream because then it'd be more likely people would try it and reap its benefits. Heck, I wish I had come across paleo sooner.

Having said that, I realize that people are very resistant to change, and are unlikely to change unless they themselves are ready for it. I think that the type of person who would reject paleo because of whatever it is that they don't like about its name, is just not quite there yet in terms of being ready. So I think we should focus more on spreading the word on paleo, rather than focusing too much on the name itself.

A82d8cbea04392ebcb1a819bddc4a259

(190)

on September 05, 2011
at 01:55 AM

Agreed, awareness is key.

2
9bc6f3df8db981f67ea1465411958c8d

on November 30, 2010
at 11:25 PM

There are plenty of Paleo-like approaches that aren't referred as paleo at all:

Weston A. Price, protein power, the healthy skeptic and the perfect health diet are four examples that come to mind.

The reason why Paleo might reach more people than any of those other approaches taken separately is probably due from the fact that different people decided to agree around a name and a general concept instead of having every blogger out there put up a name for their specific take on the diet. I think that this is a good thing and that the Paleo concept is doing really well right now.

I'm not saying that those who decide to brand and name their specific take on an optimal diet aren't doing a good job, but that they probably won't become recognized individually by a mass of people as large as the paleo concept does.

Like others here, it's the name Paleo that in part made me interested to it in the first place. South beach, Atkins, Zone, blood type diet ... Those names don't mean a thing to me and don't seem to have a strong enough background framework to support a perfect health for everybody out there. On the opposite side, a diet based on a framework that studies our genes and evolutionary background can't get any better really.

2
21084e275703e9a3909dafa28e5d29b5

(1103)

on November 30, 2010
at 04:29 PM

I understand wanting to make this more attractive to the world (trust me, I'll tell anyone who will listen) but lets be honest...getting people to change is HARD. And remember, as mom always said, you can't control others, you can only control yourself.

The diet might sound scary and difficult (what do you mean no donuts/cereal/pizza/pasta/etc???) but the truth of the matter is living the non-paleo lifestyle is even harder: Heart disease (#1 killer in men and momen in the US!), Diabetes, IBS, auto immune disorders, unwanted body fat, low energy, and honestly constant pain and suffering. I think as long as you keep telling the truth, living by example people will see that eating this way will help you not only LIVE but also THRIVE! People will see the success paleo eaters have and eventually, one by one, put those donuts down and try it for themselves.

2
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on November 30, 2010
at 03:56 PM

My thought initially was that alcoholics would be a good target demographic. It's the best diet for the liver. Then I thought it should be marketed toward diabetics. Best diet to normalize blood sugars. Then I thought about the obese, the sick, the mentally depraved...it really is the Optimal Diet. Of course, this name is already taken, by one of the original paleo diets...

So, I've got nothing.

2
154bf5c84f7bd9f52b361b45d05dbc3a

(1215)

on November 30, 2010
at 02:59 PM

So am I the only person that actually enjoys the idea that I'm eating like a cave-man? Especially for men I would think it appeals to get in touch with their raw animal side, unhindered by the expectations of society, all be it only through what they eat.

Since I always thought I ate healthy I was never interested in dieting. That was just for people that were overweight. If it had been given some fancy name XYZ-diet I would have skipped right past it.

But the 'paleolithic' part allowed it make almost instant sense to me.

The one thing I do modify when I speak about this way of eating is the 'diet' part.

I call it paleo-nutrition rather than diet. The word 'diet' has a different connotation amongst 90% of people than what it actually means.

EDIT: I just listened to the podcast by Robb Wolf, really sad something grounded in science needs to be re-branded for fear of offending religious people.

3c04e97f68c270d7a03861e2daf75f68

(40)

on December 01, 2010
at 11:23 PM

Maybe I didn't listen as carefully as you but I didn't get that impression at all from the Robb Wolf discussion. I think he's just passionate about taking it to the masses and that the paleo tag makes it less acceptable to the people who need it most. I also quite like the primal, animalistic connotations after bein' a vegetarian so long but this is exactly why we don't need convincing. We're the marginal ones. In a world where most people want and kinda need leaders, Robb is doing a great job and I'll happily give up the paleo moniker if it means people are able to get involved.

Cf1189fc2e0acdd49ce566e43238ffb6

on November 30, 2010
at 10:45 PM

yea I like to refer to it as paleolithic or evolutionary nutrition or lifestyle, people put too many bad connotations on the word diet.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 01, 2010
at 01:45 AM

It is fun. I have a t-shirt that says: "Meat. Fire. Good." Sometimes I tell people I'm on a high saturated fat diet, just to freak them out. But when I'm serious, I tell them its not reenactment, its using the idea of what they ate to replicate a healthy diet here and now. But I fantasize about going outside with nothing but a rock and a stick and trying to survive. (LOL - I wouldn't last 2 days!)

630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on December 01, 2010
at 03:26 AM

I think I like the "caveman" idea conceptually... when it's in my own head. However, the misogynistic social connotations attached to the stereotype make it less appealing. That and, as I wrote a couple days ago, I don't think cave dwelling was every a reliable habitation strategy for a significant number of humans. Regarding your edit: A-men brother! The capitulation of science has been lame for centuries; capitulation for marketing purposes seems doubly so.

2
Db4e2062cad50ab5042dfc5685c3e06d

on November 30, 2010
at 11:23 AM

It requires some marketing when you're trying to change the health of others. I teach "the paleo diet" to a group of people at my gym as a weight loss course (mostly to ladies of a certain age, all looking to lose a fair amount of weight). I don't call it paleo but occasionally reference the evolutionary ideas behind it all. This is to prevent alienating people from what I'm trying to teach (practical weight loss). Too many people have been on too many extreme diets. I even had some practicing christians join my group, I had to stop using the 'e' word all together or risk alienating them (they've achieved some of the best weight loss so far).

So possibly in need of a change - but maybe with a big reveal at the end with a TADAAAAH! You've been eating like a caveman...

3c04e97f68c270d7a03861e2daf75f68

(40)

on December 01, 2010
at 11:37 PM

I think I'm with you on this. If the people such as yourself who choose to stand up and lead others into better health need to call it something else, so be it, as long as the concept isn't diluted. I couldn't really give a rats ass what other people eat but more power to you for fighting to help others achieve their goals and live a little better.

1
Aa1d5fbb9d8051538161c9a03afd384e

on November 30, 2010
at 09:07 AM

Just state the facts. Names are secondary... I don't like to see "Paleo" as a religion in which you have to proselytize to gain salvation.

0
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 30, 2010
at 09:41 AM

I am slightly uncomfortable with "paleolithic diet", if for no other reason then to me it implys we are eating rocks. And not the fresh kind either.

In the privacy of my head I think of it as something like digestive/endocrine system function optimization or hacking the hunger.

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