0

votes

Physical fitness versus diet for changing America's health

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 28, 2012 at 12:57 AM

I know a lot of you aren't from the US. Undoubtedly you're still aware that a lot of americans are fat and sick. Your countries are unfortunately most likely on the way.

How many of you think it'd be easier to improve the health of america by getting more people lifting weights than by trying to change the way people eat?

I see pro footballers here in america in camp and these guys are monsters - fit beasts. None of them eat paleo. No, rather the teams have cooks who usually cook all their meals. They are usually whole foods - good leanISH protein, whole grains, veggies. Good good food but not at all paleo.

Instead of trying to change people's eating and make them eliminate a whole group of what they consider foods (grains) would it be easier to convince more people to continually lift weights through adulthood and on?

It seems the fitter and stronger you are the more easily you can handle less than optimal foods.

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on July 26, 2012
at 12:00 AM

Yes, it is. Very inspiring & at times, ass-kicking...lol!

F8f38dfefde197df8ac1782ab6e65a60

(220)

on July 01, 2012
at 12:32 PM

Wow this is awesome! It must be inspiring to have someone like Keith in your life!

81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on May 31, 2012
at 03:26 PM

If you have ever been apart of a strength building/fitness community, the relationship between diet and exercise is well known. A common saying in the strength community is no amount of exercise can over come bad nutrition. Nutrition is the foundation upon which overall health and fitness is built.

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 08:57 PM

...one reason why it's so tough to get younger adults and kids (my own included) to see the value in a Paleo way of eating.

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 08:55 PM

Oh yeah, I'm down with the whole thought experiment idea. I'm an in-the-trenches guy, though, so I always try to skew things back that direction ;) One thing I didn't get into in my initial answer, though, was the n=1 reality of people beginning at different points. Young athletes, for example, can get away with dietary "sins" that a middle-aged office worker can't dream of doing. I'm not saying that young athlete isn't chipping away at his health (as measured by blood biomarkers, for example), but at least from the ability to "absorb and mitigate damage", he's at a decided advantage.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 28, 2012
at 06:00 PM

Why is there a major difference?

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on May 28, 2012
at 05:57 PM

He's certainly passionate about what he does. As anyone who reads his blog knows he combines modalities from every type of protocol and uses them all to benefit his clients in the best possible way. Me, being one of them. :)

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on May 28, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Wow, who downvoted Keith's comment without making a comment?

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:40 PM

The question is certainly eliciting some interesting and meritorious answers. Perhaps I was just feeling cranky last night. The way it was framed struck me as a little too much "let's fix all these other ignorant people out there," but that may say more about me than about the question.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Healing gut dysbiosis (gluten-free Paleo will help most, GAPS diet may be necessary) and replenishing nutrients by eating a nutrient-dense Primal/Paleo diet will go a long way towards eliminating obesity. If your gut is healthy, then you can probably eat grains, etc with no problem. Read Melissa's blog at www.huntgatherlove.com for more on this.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:17 PM

And it seems that a large percent of the American (and British, from my experience) population has gut dysbiosis and if they keep eating grains, they will not be absorbing all of the nutrients in their food. Makes sense to me that they would be continually hungry and overeat to try to get the nutrients they need. Honestly, I think malnutrition is a big contributor to obesity.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:12 PM

Ben~ Of course older men (and women of all ages) can weight train very easily, As a former personal trainer, I worked with ALL ages and specialized in older adults & women. The only folk who saw quick results from exercise only, were the young men with no insulin resistance/hormonal imbalance. Often the older folk were more consistent with their workouts than the young men, too.

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Agreed. My sis-in-law (early 40s, youngest of her 4 kids is 10) is obese but can run a 5K and easily do a bootcamp workout.

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 12:48 PM

*.....required.....*

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Absolute truth. USDA food pyramid-like dietary misconceptions and notions of what amount/type of exercise is require to affect health has totally wrecked the average Joe and Jane.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:43 PM

to be easier to convince an otherwise uneducated person to start and continually engage in physical culture than to re-think their eating and eliminate whole groups of very affordable edibles: grains, legumes, and dairy. Anyhow, thanks so much for contributing to the discussion. All the best; love your work.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:42 PM

get to the good food. Until three years ago there was almost no fresh vegetables in my neighborhood. There is indeed a green market now every sunday. Who goes? Only those with the money of course. I'm rambling. I just thought that it'd be fun to talk among us about the idea of maybe pnysical fitness (and pretty precisely I'm talking about basic compound old time exercises or variations of) being able to have a greater effect on a larger bulk of the population. Weights and gyms (YMCAs, school gyms, etc) seem to be easier accessed than paleo (or just good) food. Also, it seems to me at any rate,

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:39 PM

Thanks for chiming in, Keith. As i commented to your wife below, I read your stuff religiously. I think you're on the ball. I was just asking the question because much of what we discuss on these boards is very food-oriented. That's fine - it's called paleohacks after all. I'm just trying to reassess stuff. I have come around to thinking that the majority of america won't and is not capable of, going paleo. They won't and can not even eat a better version of SAD. It's simply not going to happen. There's many reasons, only one being that the vast majority of us in the inner city - we can't even

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Thanks for the reply. I would say that older men can engage in weight-training quite easily. They stand to reap the same rewards any one else does. Women for that matter, too. I fully acknowledge that hormones play a crucial crucial roll. I know nothing about child birth so thanks for bringing that up. I would totally agree that good paleo eating will help eliminate hormone-screwing variables.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:33 PM

I'm glad you ask that, Jeff. The canard that children shouldn't engage in strength training is antiquated.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:32 PM

What is the public conception of physical fitness? Don't be glib. Give us a proper answer if you're going to write something. I'd say the idea of leanness (low levels of body fat), more rather than less muscle mass, good posture, good mobility, the capability to perform pretty much any task one wants to...these all seem to me to be publicly accepted ideas of physical fitness. They seem correct to me. What do you think?

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:31 PM

I like what you said and how simply you said it!!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:30 PM

Well constructed answer. Thanks.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:29 PM

I certainly do enjoy reading Keith's stuff. Thanks for chiming in. I take everything he says seriously.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:27 PM

I just thought it'd be fun to discuss.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on May 28, 2012
at 04:13 AM

Thumbs up for the difference in genders and age. SOoo many of my mum's menopausal friends are desperately increasing their gym times to 7 days a week, even twice a day, while experiencing weight gain and exhaustion. They are all 15-20 lbs over their "ideal" and struggling, with constant, intense exercise.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:48 AM

and yes, activity does improve insulin resistance

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:47 AM

why do you say children cant lift weights?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:00 AM

Btw I kow the two choices are or mutually exclusive but let's pretend they are for discussion.

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14 Answers

8
4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on May 28, 2012
at 04:15 AM

I'm sorry but I beg to differ this is something that my husband, Keith Norris of Theory to Practice blog www.ancestralmomentum.com speaks on, at conferences all over the country, quite a bit. The difference between health & performance. Pro and/or elite athletes are NOT fit. They can perform well come game day & seem to be in top form, yes but check their health bio-markers & the majority of them are ticking time-bombs with tons of health issues and ailments. That is not health nor fitness and it does not take that kind of time in the gym to become fit & healthy. The Paleo diet married with a well-planned fitness program like that of Efficient Exercise for 2 - 30 minute sessions per week can completely change someone's health inside of 10 weeks. Efficient Exercise has proven it time & time again. Transformation participants at Efficient Exercise that took part for my husband's presentation at Paleo FX saw tremendous changes. There's no easy way out of regaining good health once you've allowed yourself to slip into the SAD diet & get away from any physical fitness program but this is not much to do, in order to gain it back.

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on May 28, 2012
at 05:57 PM

He's certainly passionate about what he does. As anyone who reads his blog knows he combines modalities from every type of protocol and uses them all to benefit his clients in the best possible way. Me, being one of them. :)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:29 PM

I certainly do enjoy reading Keith's stuff. Thanks for chiming in. I take everything he says seriously.

F8f38dfefde197df8ac1782ab6e65a60

(220)

on July 01, 2012
at 12:32 PM

Wow this is awesome! It must be inspiring to have someone like Keith in your life!

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on July 26, 2012
at 12:00 AM

Yes, it is. Very inspiring & at times, ass-kicking...lol!

7
Db324bd4457587115e48afcd243b00d3

on May 28, 2012
at 04:55 AM

You can't eat your way to fitness. You can't exercise away the results of bad food. 'Ideal weight' is not a marker of good health, weight loss is not a marker of health improvement. It's a team effort. If you want to be fit and healthy you need to eat good and move. It doesn't really matter if you lift weights or go hiking or swim or ride a bicycle. Diet is most of the answer to weight loss. Activity is the entire answer to fitness.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:31 PM

I like what you said and how simply you said it!!

6
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:14 AM

Pro-footballers are generally young & male. Women and older men are a whole different ball of wax.

My sister has been exercising (weights & walking) for YEARS trying to lose the 30 pounds she put on since having kids.

She will probably lose 15 pounds of water weight (like I did) as soon as she drops the grains.

For hormonal balance, you can't beat a nutrient-dense Primal/Paleo diet.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Thanks for the reply. I would say that older men can engage in weight-training quite easily. They stand to reap the same rewards any one else does. Women for that matter, too. I fully acknowledge that hormones play a crucial crucial roll. I know nothing about child birth so thanks for bringing that up. I would totally agree that good paleo eating will help eliminate hormone-screwing variables.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:12 PM

Ben~ Of course older men (and women of all ages) can weight train very easily, As a former personal trainer, I worked with ALL ages and specialized in older adults & women. The only folk who saw quick results from exercise only, were the young men with no insulin resistance/hormonal imbalance. Often the older folk were more consistent with their workouts than the young men, too.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on May 28, 2012
at 04:13 AM

Thumbs up for the difference in genders and age. SOoo many of my mum's menopausal friends are desperately increasing their gym times to 7 days a week, even twice a day, while experiencing weight gain and exhaustion. They are all 15-20 lbs over their "ideal" and struggling, with constant, intense exercise.

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Agreed. My sis-in-law (early 40s, youngest of her 4 kids is 10) is obese but can run a 5K and easily do a bootcamp workout.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Healing gut dysbiosis (gluten-free Paleo will help most, GAPS diet may be necessary) and replenishing nutrients by eating a nutrient-dense Primal/Paleo diet will go a long way towards eliminating obesity. If your gut is healthy, then you can probably eat grains, etc with no problem. Read Melissa's blog at www.huntgatherlove.com for more on this.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:17 PM

And it seems that a large percent of the American (and British, from my experience) population has gut dysbiosis and if they keep eating grains, they will not be absorbing all of the nutrients in their food. Makes sense to me that they would be continually hungry and overeat to try to get the nutrients they need. Honestly, I think malnutrition is a big contributor to obesity.

5
92d67b02a709cad2250f10848f9178e6

on May 28, 2012
at 02:52 AM

Diet is more important. Changing one's diet alone can prevent and reverse obesity and related chronic diseases. Lifting weights alone without dietary changes won't have the same effects on one's health, because that does not remove the factors that resulted in obesity in the first place.

Eating grains is not the biggest problem. There are many traditional cultures that consume a lot of grains and are perfectly healthy. As Ludwig writes, I think it's the diet based on processed products that promotes obesity and chronic disease in America.

How to introduce to dietary changes? I am with David Ludwig on this one. What we need is a research-based prevention intervention program in broader social, cultural and environmental contexts. We need to introduce BOTH individual and societal changes that involve the government, public and industry.

Government: restructure agricultural subsidies in favor of whole foods, regulate food marketing, fund school lunches properly; Public: buy fewer crap food, cook at home; Schools: serve whole foods, teach home ed; Industry: use whole foods, market minimally processed foods (Ludwig, 2011).

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:30 PM

Well constructed answer. Thanks.

4
5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 12:30 PM

Yeah, to be sure the answer is "both", and I think we, as a community, need to emphasize that reality; continue to beat that drum. Americans love polarizing questions and soundbite answers and we just can't give in to this kind of dumbing-down if, in fact, our aim is to positively affect American healthcare. The way I've answered this with my Efficient Exercise clients is this: in evolutionary terms, our species was first and foremost obligate physical beings, and opportunistic eaters. Obligate "movers", opportunistic eaters. Most get that right off -- it makes sense. But carrying this a bit further, I also note the limited variety of food choices available to these opportunistic eaters. Drop this "Obligate mover, opportunistic eater criteria into the food choices/movement limitation options inherent in a 21st century modern landscape and the rules change. "One can't exercise his way out of a crappy diet" begets the question of (for example) Lance Armstrong -- visually, at least -- and performance-wise -- he's a beast. I won't get into the whole health vs performance thing, as I think most here know where I'm going with that. I also know people who are models of the Paleo diet and who are nowhere near in good physical condition (high bodyfat, etc...). So is it diet or properly programmed exercise? The answer is "yes" ;)

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 08:55 PM

Oh yeah, I'm down with the whole thought experiment idea. I'm an in-the-trenches guy, though, so I always try to skew things back that direction ;) One thing I didn't get into in my initial answer, though, was the n=1 reality of people beginning at different points. Young athletes, for example, can get away with dietary "sins" that a middle-aged office worker can't dream of doing. I'm not saying that young athlete isn't chipping away at his health (as measured by blood biomarkers, for example), but at least from the ability to "absorb and mitigate damage", he's at a decided advantage.

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 08:57 PM

...one reason why it's so tough to get younger adults and kids (my own included) to see the value in a Paleo way of eating.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:39 PM

Thanks for chiming in, Keith. As i commented to your wife below, I read your stuff religiously. I think you're on the ball. I was just asking the question because much of what we discuss on these boards is very food-oriented. That's fine - it's called paleohacks after all. I'm just trying to reassess stuff. I have come around to thinking that the majority of america won't and is not capable of, going paleo. They won't and can not even eat a better version of SAD. It's simply not going to happen. There's many reasons, only one being that the vast majority of us in the inner city - we can't even

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:42 PM

get to the good food. Until three years ago there was almost no fresh vegetables in my neighborhood. There is indeed a green market now every sunday. Who goes? Only those with the money of course. I'm rambling. I just thought that it'd be fun to talk among us about the idea of maybe pnysical fitness (and pretty precisely I'm talking about basic compound old time exercises or variations of) being able to have a greater effect on a larger bulk of the population. Weights and gyms (YMCAs, school gyms, etc) seem to be easier accessed than paleo (or just good) food. Also, it seems to me at any rate,

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on May 28, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Wow, who downvoted Keith's comment without making a comment?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:43 PM

to be easier to convince an otherwise uneducated person to start and continually engage in physical culture than to re-think their eating and eliminate whole groups of very affordable edibles: grains, legumes, and dairy. Anyhow, thanks so much for contributing to the discussion. All the best; love your work.

4
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on May 28, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Yeah, sorry. Diet is where it's at.

I work out less now than I ever did as an adult. I lost 15 pounds without trying very hard just by going Paleo. I had a knee injury at the time that kept me off most exercise. It was a miracle.

You can't solve crappy inputs with exercise. Diet is the main one, but sleep, stress, and other factors weigh in too.

I don't think it's necessary for everyone to go Paleo, but the food system is broken. For now, it's up to the individual to make the choice to step outside of it to save themselves. Until the problems are addressed on a large scale, we won't see any real change. And no amount of weight lifting will change that.

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Diet influences health more than exercise. Exercise influences fitness more than diet. Is the problem with American our health or our fitness? I'm pretty sure it's health.

That said, exercise shouldn't so quickly discounted. Even increased activity through walking produces tremendous results, but that's not likely going to happen soon. Can't help but think back to the mall parking lot scene in Fat Head...

1
Ccde5a8936b400a752c45fb91d427432

on May 28, 2012
at 04:44 AM

Check out my www.transevolutionaryfitness.wordpress.com for a comprehensive series of essays on the matter, none advocating commercial theories of exercise or diet. To date, the Paleo movement does not and has not caught up with contemporary genomic based exercise physiology. The Paleo FX festival was far from a conference, major contributors to the field not included in order to make plenty of space for those secondary or more removed from an emerging new science and coaching art. Unfortunately, most training systems branding themselves as 'paleo' or the like are carry overs from the pre-evolutionary medicine period - such as HIT, P90X, Tony Little, Richard Simmons, CrossFit, you name it - The Paleo movement disconnected itself from ongoing scientific research and coaching know-how, painting itself into a corner in order to hawk 'fitness' schemes devoid of evolutionary science foundation. We clearly are in need of unbiased consumer advocates rather than investment in commercial, incomplete movements of exercise- remember, a system is not a random collection of parts or old fashioned ideas. Science and coaching art rocks. In my case, most students progress so rapidly that those close to them wonder if they're on steroids since we break the rules of the Fitness Industry by means of working with the human genome!

0
Dbd438732c2918192aa4df99ec6a448a

on May 31, 2012
at 01:32 PM

It is really needed to take care for our diet to be fit and healthy. Also we should keep track of our workout. Ultimately a good workout and a good diet make us healthy.

gyms in south jersey

0
10cadc0a2dff90c849c6d088832be324

(741)

on May 28, 2012
at 10:51 AM

There has to be balance between both. That being said americans won't get healthy on excercise alone. Go youtube "The skinny on obesity" It's a 7 part series. There are 2 series by the same name so loon for the one by Dr. Robert Lustig

0
870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 28, 2012
at 05:27 AM

I thought the idea was that everyone needs to find what works for him or her, and that everyone's body is different.

I can barely figure out my own body. How on earth can I possibly know what "America" should be doing to improve "America's" health?

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:40 PM

The question is certainly eliciting some interesting and meritorious answers. Perhaps I was just feeling cranky last night. The way it was framed struck me as a little too much "let's fix all these other ignorant people out there," but that may say more about me than about the question.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:27 PM

I just thought it'd be fun to discuss.

0
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on May 28, 2012
at 03:57 AM

There is a MAJOR difference between what happens when a 7% BF athlete football player consumes a carbohydrate or some corn than the 'typical american'. OK? Do you get that???? Overall, the typical American lard butt would do better changing their eating habits before their physical exertion. HOWEVER, working out (lifting weights, bc cardio is not a workout!) should be implemented as soon as physically possible. Don't like this post???? Tooo freaking bad.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 28, 2012
at 06:00 PM

Why is there a major difference?

0
5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:26 AM

The public conception of physical fitness is probably counter-productive.

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Absolute truth. USDA food pyramid-like dietary misconceptions and notions of what amount/type of exercise is require to affect health has totally wrecked the average Joe and Jane.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:32 PM

What is the public conception of physical fitness? Don't be glib. Give us a proper answer if you're going to write something. I'd say the idea of leanness (low levels of body fat), more rather than less muscle mass, good posture, good mobility, the capability to perform pretty much any task one wants to...these all seem to me to be publicly accepted ideas of physical fitness. They seem correct to me. What do you think?

5a30a21286d25fa75b35990bc0293e79

on May 28, 2012
at 12:48 PM

*.....required.....*

0
1aa42ad69e7a5ea23d748879e0b533d7

on May 28, 2012
at 01:24 AM

Any nutritionist claim both are needed; for instance, sportive activities favour intestinal transit combined with prunes; it's really a lifestyle and what must understand is they must stick to it for long, ideally for life.

Instruction must be done in school, as it was its prerogative, so that the basis knowledge of diet, regimen can be carried; education must be done at home and must pursue, complete and strengthen the instruction.

Bodybuilding cannot be done for children, but awareness for physical activities must arise in PE.

Now, as you mention, if we start with a population already sick; we cannot put them immediately under a sportive stress [say, running for an obese will destroy his knees] in such a way nutrition remains the sole starting point [with walks].

For those not so-desperately fat; working out has no appeal so that, anew, a proper regimen might be set up but with more work-outs for them, given that, what matters most in this issue is regularity (and to push one's limits if we wish to gain muscle).

"It seems the fitter and stronger you are the more easily you can handle less than optimal foods."

I believe I read somewhere physical activities improves insulin resistance!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:47 AM

why do you say children cant lift weights?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on May 28, 2012
at 01:48 AM

and yes, activity does improve insulin resistance

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 28, 2012
at 12:33 PM

I'm glad you ask that, Jeff. The canard that children shouldn't engage in strength training is antiquated.

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