9

votes

Paleo Pets: Got any tips for cheap, tasty pet treats?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 27, 2011 at 4:58 PM

This is Melky, my BTF (Boston Terrier Forever).

alt text

He loves tasty paleo treats that give him a shiny, silky-smooth coat and perk him up in the morning so he can lick his master's face to death until that old lug wakes up.

My pick for paleo treats for my pet is sardines.

They're both cheap (.89) and packed with nutrients. Sardines provide "total nutrition" for my paleo pal: Omega 3 fatty acids, Protein, Vitamin D, Calcium, Vitamin B12, Tryptophan, Selenium, Phosphorus, Vitamin B3...even Coenzyme Q10.

I'm feeding my boy 1 can/day along with grain-free dry food (which can get expensive).

Do you have any paleo treats you like to feed your pet?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 04, 2012
at 05:18 AM

Yes, i give them raw giblets, raw meat and raw bones--it varies. At Thanksgiving, I cut cross-sections of the turkey neck; as my dogs are very small, I made additional cuts to get manageable pieces. They loved it! Later, I gave them each a bit of liver and a bit of raw meat from the back, scraps from where I cut out the spine in order to butterfly the turkey. I also spoon bone broth, either warmed or in jelly form, over their food at times.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on December 03, 2012
at 05:24 PM

Nance - Do you give the chicken giblets to your dog raw?

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on November 07, 2011
at 05:21 PM

I would like to know exactly what danger the bones represent (assuming they're soft enough that splintering isn't an issue). The main complaint we've heard from vets about raw diets for dogs is that they don't provide adequate minerals because many people only feed meat, not the bones, and feeding softened bones is one way to address this. If mineral content is the issue, might feeding bones present a bigger danger to a dog on a processed diet that's already heavily supplemented?

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 29, 2011
at 10:23 PM

Important enough that a biotin deficiency can really eff you up. It's not a concern so long as raw egg whites aren't a large part of the diet. But say, a dozen raw egg whites per week, for a small dog who doesn't have have a diet containing extra biotin as-is - that could easily cause a symptomatic deficiency. If you want to feed your pet a lot of eggs, cook them (I do) or feed them the yolks and shells only.

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on June 29, 2011
at 10:48 AM

Mostly conventional, although if I have grass fed, he gets to share. I switched him to a totally raw diet after my other dog died of lymphoma. Mostly conventional raw meaty bones, and he is thriving on it.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 28, 2011
at 12:24 PM

OK, we're going to have to agree to disagree. well, at least we're feeding our dogs less-processed stuff than the pet stores sell. cheers.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 28, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Mine's having her raw duck patty tonight:)

8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:52 AM

Your animals eat better than most humans. Good owner!

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:44 AM

If the bones are cooked for 36 hours and soft to the touch, they are fine. The only reason cooked bones (and most aren't cooked longer than an hour or two) are generally a concern because they are more brittle than raw bones, and are prone to splinter and flake into sharp shards that can cause serious internal injuries. But bones cooked until they are pudding are a-ok. I would keep doing what you are doing meredith, you are giving your dogs an excellent source of calcium, phosphorus etc that is almost pre-digested!

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 28, 2011
at 12:27 AM

I highly doubt it and I won't touch grocery store meat for me or my human family. Unfortunately I can't afford the good stuff for my pets.

Bd142c32b4055224d3191461f1f57520

(1098)

on June 28, 2011
at 12:26 AM

I don't have anything to add other than I absolutely love Boston Terriers!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:52 PM

Im sorry i have to comment again: occasionally, yes, a little bit of cooked bone is not going to kill them. No, of course not. However the person who wrote the answer says she makes the broth a LOT and that leads me to think the dog is regularly getting cooked bones like that. That is a known danger if done regularly like that.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:33 PM

My pets are so 'meh' about these! They are great for any animal with joint issues or arthritis though

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:17 PM

That's a good trick -- I use training treats, and I like this idea better than cheap junk salami or something.

9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on June 27, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Yes, once they get their technique down, they plow through things pretty fast.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Totally endorse the kongs. I freeze them too. I used to think they provided hours of entertainment, but then one day I stayed home and watched Buster chow on that huge, frozen thing, and it took him all of five minutes to wipe it out, lol.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 08:10 PM

Yummy! Must add to shopping list.

D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

(1160)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:47 PM

No, it's fine if they've spent 36 hours in the crock pot. My dog gets mostly raw bones, but I'll occasionally toss him a knuckle that's close to disintegration.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:33 PM

If your goal is to have a more effective alarm clock in the AM, I wonder if he would eat *haggis*? That'll cut through the morning fog in a jiffy with the first lick.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:32 PM

And I usually manage to feed both of them plus my two cats for $80 - $120 per month.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:31 PM

I have a one-eyed cat by the name of Mr. Magoo, that eats bacon and butter.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Hah! I don't even get to eat grass-fed as often as I like, since I usually make less than $15,000 per year! My pets mostly live on bony scrap parts from local butchers like fowl necks and backs and stripped fish carcasses, also whatever leftovers I can scrape off the dead deer my hunter friends let me scavenge, soon-to-expire 'sale meats', etc. I have to get creative to feed them this way affordable. My dogs together weigh more than me.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:28 PM

Hah! I don't even get to eat grass-fed as often as I like, since I usually make less than $15,000 per year! My pets live on scrap parts like fowl necks and backs, whatever leftovers I can scrape of the deer carcasses my hunter friends let me scavenge, soon-to-expire 'sale meats', etc.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:16 PM

Is the organ meat from grass-fed animals or feedlot? And does that even matter when it comes to organ meats?

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:14 PM

I learned that in my nutrition class this semester. But eggs contain all the essential amino acids. How important is biotin in comparison?

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:07 PM

Grass fed? I wish I could afford that!

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Raw eggs in excess are not a good idea. The raw white blocks absorption of biotin, which many pets don't get in sufficient amounts already. This goes for humans too.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Meredith, our garden gets the shells, too. Ben, Buster seems to care for the shells less than the contents. He eats them last, and sometimes leaves some behind, too. Interesting! He's such a healthy and good-looking dog that I regret not knowing about raw feeding when we had our first girl, Daisy. I bet Simon's in top shape, too. :)

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:49 PM

Is liver sold in supermarkets free of toxins and Omega 6 fats?

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:49 PM

I'm going to check out the Asian market. That's a great tip! There always seems to be cheap fish there.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:46 PM

Poo! Really!?!?! Even if they are the consistency of pudding. I'll stop - thanks!

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:43 PM

Sorry- For a package of about 2 cups of dried anchovies.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Don't feed cooked bones to dogs. Very dangerous. Bones should only be given raw.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Wow, that's our menu, too! Although sometimes my boy Simon will leave some shell behind.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:36 PM

Oh yeah - egg shells. I keep my egg shells and grind them for puppy and garden and sometime me. Great point R!

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:35 PM

Word. Thank you.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:32 PM

On the image hosting site right click on your photo and select "view image" so that only the photo is on the browser page, then use the address from that page.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:31 PM

Raw eggs are fine, they are just not as much fun to catch in the air. Treats should be snapped out of the air, otherwise they are just foods. :)

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:30 PM

My pup gets a lot of raw eggs, with shells. In nearly four years, he's never had an issue.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Hey - ship your sloppy goopy stuff to Bamers. Two birds - one stone! I am sure his postal carrier won't mind :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:25 PM

Fixed the photo.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:23 PM

Thanks Matthew. I won't ask how you did that.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:20 PM

I got those pieces with my cow order. I've been making stew with them. Wish I had a dog to give them to.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:19 PM

Aside from the salmonella risk, I can't see why not.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Good point about the supermarket being an option. I guess since we're dealing with cartilage and bone tissue I don't have to worry about the beef not being grass-fed. I think...

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Well I'm kuntry - so I buy my meat at farm out here and the throw in the whatnot no one else seems to want. Things like cartiladginous odds and ends. eatwild.com has a list of farms you can buy direct from. Or, conventional bones are always in the supermarket - usually considered pet food. Often times this is how raw milk is sold as well.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:06 PM

Thanks Meredith!(*blushes*) Where do you get the beef knuckles and joints?

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:04 PM

Are raw eggs ok?

  • 226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

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14 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(4878)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:27 PM

Dehydrated Green Tripe. paleo-pets:--got-any-tips-for-cheap,-tasty-pet-treats?

AKA: THE high value treat. It is expensive, but for training purposes there is nothing else that will get his little heart beating as fast as this "doggie crack."

But I don't think you'll want him to lick your face after eating it.

And, if you want good (grass fed) beef liver mixed into it, check out the products at GreenTripe.com,

3
23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:42 PM

My dogs get raw beef scrap bones- marrowy and cartilge but also rib bones and whatnot, whole chicken legs or wings, egg yolk, sea salt and liver- whatever liver I can get in them and chicken giblets. I keep an eye on the 'reduced for quick sale' section at the grocery store to get super cheap steak, chicken, whatever and just throw it in the freezer. I've dehydrated liver and heart in thin slices for treats. My cats get a grain free dry food and then raw egg yolk and liver mixed with some canned grain free. I'll also add chicken wing tips or fish scraps (ask at your seafood counter about fish heads/scraps for stock but save the salmon heads for yourself :P). A treat they absolutely LOVE, and so does my one dog that thinks he's a cat, are my son's dried anchovies. You can buy them in the frozen section of Asian markets for under $2.

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:43 PM

Sorry- For a package of about 2 cups of dried anchovies.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:49 PM

I'm going to check out the Asian market. That's a great tip! There always seems to be cheap fish there.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:49 PM

Is liver sold in supermarkets free of toxins and Omega 6 fats?

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 28, 2011
at 12:27 AM

I highly doubt it and I won't touch grocery store meat for me or my human family. Unfortunately I can't afford the good stuff for my pets.

8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:52 AM

Your animals eat better than most humans. Good owner!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 28, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Mine's having her raw duck patty tonight:)

3
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:03 PM

I make a lot of bone broth. My pooch gets the bones (big beef knuckles/joints) which after 36 hours in the crockpot are so soft that my 18 month old could probably eat them.

PS - AWWWWWW what a cute question Torso Dude!

EDIT - HEY I was wrong about the cooked bones apparently - raw only. Ooops.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:06 PM

Thanks Meredith!(*blushes*) Where do you get the beef knuckles and joints?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Well I'm kuntry - so I buy my meat at farm out here and the throw in the whatnot no one else seems to want. Things like cartiladginous odds and ends. eatwild.com has a list of farms you can buy direct from. Or, conventional bones are always in the supermarket - usually considered pet food. Often times this is how raw milk is sold as well.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Hey - ship your sloppy goopy stuff to Bamers. Two birds - one stone! I am sure his postal carrier won't mind :)

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:46 PM

Poo! Really!?!?! Even if they are the consistency of pudding. I'll stop - thanks!

D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

(1160)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:47 PM

No, it's fine if they've spent 36 hours in the crock pot. My dog gets mostly raw bones, but I'll occasionally toss him a knuckle that's close to disintegration.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Don't feed cooked bones to dogs. Very dangerous. Bones should only be given raw.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:20 PM

I got those pieces with my cow order. I've been making stew with them. Wish I had a dog to give them to.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Good point about the supermarket being an option. I guess since we're dealing with cartilage and bone tissue I don't have to worry about the beef not being grass-fed. I think...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:52 PM

Im sorry i have to comment again: occasionally, yes, a little bit of cooked bone is not going to kill them. No, of course not. However the person who wrote the answer says she makes the broth a LOT and that leads me to think the dog is regularly getting cooked bones like that. That is a known danger if done regularly like that.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:44 AM

If the bones are cooked for 36 hours and soft to the touch, they are fine. The only reason cooked bones (and most aren't cooked longer than an hour or two) are generally a concern because they are more brittle than raw bones, and are prone to splinter and flake into sharp shards that can cause serious internal injuries. But bones cooked until they are pudding are a-ok. I would keep doing what you are doing meredith, you are giving your dogs an excellent source of calcium, phosphorus etc that is almost pre-digested!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 28, 2011
at 12:24 PM

OK, we're going to have to agree to disagree. well, at least we're feeding our dogs less-processed stuff than the pet stores sell. cheers.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on November 07, 2011
at 05:21 PM

I would like to know exactly what danger the bones represent (assuming they're soft enough that splintering isn't an issue). The main complaint we've heard from vets about raw diets for dogs is that they don't provide adequate minerals because many people only feed meat, not the bones, and feeding softened bones is one way to address this. If mineral content is the issue, might feeding bones present a bigger danger to a dog on a processed diet that's already heavily supplemented?

2
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on June 27, 2011
at 09:10 PM

My dogs get bones and things like that. They currently have a package of lamb necks defrosting for them. So, pretty much ditto what everyone else said.

But...

My boy dog won't eat raw chicken. Not really sure what that's all about, but it does mean giving him raw chicken liver is out of the question. So usually I take a container of chicken livers, boil them for about a minute so they are less mushy and more solid. Then I cut them into small pieces and dehydrate them for a while. They'll keep really well in a glass jar and I always have a steady supply of training-size treats.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:17 PM

That's a good trick -- I use training treats, and I like this idea better than cheap junk salami or something.

2
D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

on June 27, 2011
at 06:48 PM

Raw chicken feet.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 08:10 PM

Yummy! Must add to shopping list.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 09:33 PM

My pets are so 'meh' about these! They are great for any animal with joint issues or arthritis though

2
A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:34 PM

I make jerky for them, no seasonings, just slice kidneys, livers, lungs, whatever I get at the butchers. This way it's easy to keep. I never started my dogs on a "raw" diet (they're 7) so if I try to give them anything raw now they look at me like i'm an idiot. Hence, the jerky is closest thing I can get them to eat. I also give them bones after we've roasted them for us.

2
3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:27 PM

My dude gets a raw egg, with the shell, a few times a week. He also gets beef knuckles every Sunday, and glares at me if I forget. He also gets chicken livers and hearts whenever I get 'em, which also tends to be once a week.

And he gets raw meaty bones for his food every day, which he seems to consider a Paleo treat. :)

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:36 PM

Oh yeah - egg shells. I keep my egg shells and grind them for puppy and garden and sometime me. Great point R!

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Meredith, our garden gets the shells, too. Ben, Buster seems to care for the shells less than the contents. He eats them last, and sometimes leaves some behind, too. Interesting! He's such a healthy and good-looking dog that I regret not knowing about raw feeding when we had our first girl, Daisy. I bet Simon's in top shape, too. :)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Wow, that's our menu, too! Although sometimes my boy Simon will leave some shell behind.

2
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:01 PM

My Shiba Inu likes fish oil capsules, he eats them like treats. The Boston is not a fan.

Also hard boiled eggs and chicken liver... and of course raw beef bone.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:04 PM

Are raw eggs ok?

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:19 PM

Aside from the salmonella risk, I can't see why not.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Raw eggs in excess are not a good idea. The raw white blocks absorption of biotin, which many pets don't get in sufficient amounts already. This goes for humans too.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:30 PM

My pup gets a lot of raw eggs, with shells. In nearly four years, he's never had an issue.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 27, 2011
at 05:31 PM

Raw eggs are fine, they are just not as much fun to catch in the air. Treats should be snapped out of the air, otherwise they are just foods. :)

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:14 PM

I learned that in my nutrition class this semester. But eggs contain all the essential amino acids. How important is biotin in comparison?

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 29, 2011
at 10:23 PM

Important enough that a biotin deficiency can really eff you up. It's not a concern so long as raw egg whites aren't a large part of the diet. But say, a dozen raw egg whites per week, for a small dog who doesn't have have a diet containing extra biotin as-is - that could easily cause a symptomatic deficiency. If you want to feed your pet a lot of eggs, cook them (I do) or feed them the yolks and shells only.

1
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on June 29, 2011
at 07:43 PM

My pup is rad, she'll eat anything and actually eats not too far off from me. Eggs, hardboiled and raw, chopped crunchy veg, berries, meat, almond butter in the Kong. Liver, kidney, heart, etc., I'll make little mixes and give to her. She's a total runt and can't be given big food - maybe a knucklebone from a rabbit would be her size - so the latest treat I'm doing is via a flexible ice cube tray that the cubes pop out in the shape of Space Invaders. I press raw meat in, freeze, pop out, treat! She digs it :)

1
9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on June 27, 2011
at 07:02 PM

My grocery store sells packages of soup bones (round femur slices with marrow). I keep these in the freezer for my monster dog. Frozen marrow takes a little more time and effort for him to remove, and he'll gnaw on the bone later, too. Kongs can be great also. You can fill them with all kinds of scraps, then freeze them. Puppy pacifiers.

9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on June 27, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Yes, once they get their technique down, they plow through things pretty fast.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 27, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Totally endorse the kongs. I freeze them too. I used to think they provided hours of entertainment, but then one day I stayed home and watched Buster chow on that huge, frozen thing, and it took him all of five minutes to wipe it out, lol.

1
Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:14 PM

My German Shepard particularly relishes any raw organ meat.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:16 PM

Is the organ meat from grass-fed animals or feedlot? And does that even matter when it comes to organ meats?

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on June 29, 2011
at 10:48 AM

Mostly conventional, although if I have grass fed, he gets to share. I switched him to a totally raw diet after my other dog died of lymphoma. Mostly conventional raw meaty bones, and he is thriving on it.

1
26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

on June 27, 2011
at 06:06 PM

My dogs and cats eat bone-in raw meat and fish every day, and every so often cooked eggs and dairy products. I dispensed with processed pet food/grains 5 years ago, long before I went paleo myself!

For 'treats' I prefer something portable and not too messy. For training/bribing my dogs I use freeze-dried beef liver or any sort of stinky processed sausage, cut in little bits. :D

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:28 PM

Hah! I don't even get to eat grass-fed as often as I like, since I usually make less than $15,000 per year! My pets live on scrap parts like fowl necks and backs, whatever leftovers I can scrape of the deer carcasses my hunter friends let me scavenge, soon-to-expire 'sale meats', etc.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:07 PM

Grass fed? I wish I could afford that!

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:32 PM

And I usually manage to feed both of them plus my two cats for $80 - $120 per month.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 27, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Hah! I don't even get to eat grass-fed as often as I like, since I usually make less than $15,000 per year! My pets mostly live on bony scrap parts from local butchers like fowl necks and backs and stripped fish carcasses, also whatever leftovers I can scrape off the dead deer my hunter friends let me scavenge, soon-to-expire 'sale meats', etc. I have to get creative to feed them this way affordable. My dogs together weigh more than me.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 06, 2011
at 10:57 PM

My Boston won't eat any fish, but he loves chicken giblets and meaty bones. Hard to believe, but he refuses beef cubes! I'll be trying him on rabbit when the next US Wellness shipment comes. I feed about 40% raw and he can't tolerate any commercial food containing wheat or corn.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 04, 2012
at 05:18 AM

Yes, i give them raw giblets, raw meat and raw bones--it varies. At Thanksgiving, I cut cross-sections of the turkey neck; as my dogs are very small, I made additional cuts to get manageable pieces. They loved it! Later, I gave them each a bit of liver and a bit of raw meat from the back, scraps from where I cut out the spine in order to butterfly the turkey. I also spoon bone broth, either warmed or in jelly form, over their food at times.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on December 03, 2012
at 05:24 PM

Nance - Do you give the chicken giblets to your dog raw?

0
6d095edc306dcb61d8551a77623ed35b

on November 06, 2011
at 10:47 PM

you guys are awesome! thanks for all the tips on great treats! love this!

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