9

votes

Paleo Nursing Homes

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 15, 2012 at 9:41 PM

My grandfather is 91 and dementia. He got diabetes type 2 from being in the hospital and being old too. This got me thinking about if the nursing home was paleo, could a lot of these symptoms be reversed? I've read that alzheimers is sometimes called type 3 diabetes.

Also if treatment based on say functional movement, HIIT toned down for the elderly, and integrative health care.

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:06 PM

Sory to hear about your granddad

6ec8d30130a6fb274871314533b5536b

(581)

on January 18, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Even with a limited budget, why wouldn't it be plausible? If they are feeding their residents protein, vegetables, and carbohydrates anyway... why can't they severely reduce their carbohydrate budget, and put that money towards more protein and vegetables? I think it just depends on what they cut out, and where they put the extra money. That, and they just need more education and a better understanding of paleo, heart disease, diabetes, dementia, etc... and the relation of these diseases to grains and sugar. The problem is that they are stuck in conventional ideals regarding nutrition.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on January 17, 2012
at 06:29 AM

It was so morally conflicting to me to work there. Much of the treatments were the causes of the illness but there is so much regulation and so little money no one dares step out of the box.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 17, 2012
at 04:04 AM

How about a cheaper variation like Weston Price or Perfect Health Diet. The consumption of properly perpared grains would be cheaper, and bones shouldn't be that expensive. Type two diabetics being fed sugary foods is awful. I dunno why this continues.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on January 17, 2012
at 03:28 AM

Yes, I agree that Weston Price would probably work with the elderly as far as their emotional and physical acceptance of the food choices. It would be nice to see!

A1081af52b61372dbb3ed572d88968f4

(425)

on January 17, 2012
at 12:48 AM

I'm glad I added that then. My dad gets his gut tube in tomorrow. Hate to loose control over the eating, but am convinced that food/saliva in the lungs is a really bad thing. Really suggest you talk to the Drs/nutritionist about what's going in through that tube, and see if you can't make it better. Can't hurt to try?

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on January 17, 2012
at 12:26 AM

We didn't even have room for all our wheel chairs. Skilled nursing you learn to do a lot with very little. In a nursing home you wouldn't want the costs of medical treatment to go down as that is what you bill out to medicare.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on January 16, 2012
at 09:05 PM

Growing their own food is probably not the most effective distribution of resources and workload. "if they have the land for it" is a big "if". Nursing homes are high density housing, and don't generally have the amount of land necessary to feed the residents to any significant expense. Plus, you're going to need to pay farm workers, and your food supply is very subject to chance. There's a point in between "grow everything yourself" and "ship everything from the southern hemisphere because it is in season there" where you can get reasonable quality in a cost and manpower efficient manner.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on January 16, 2012
at 05:29 PM

My SNF purees EVERYTHING. Including bread. And jello. It occasionally gets a touch bizarre.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 16, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Wouldn't the costs of say medical treatment go down in proportion if they ate better? They could grow a lot of the food at the facility if they have the land for it. Although you might be able to grow food indoors near windows.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 16, 2012
at 03:55 AM

My grandfather is actually eating this way I saw a bottle of something similar at the hospital. I dunno for how long, but his gag reflex is not working so this is routed into his gut. He does have a problem with saliva dripping into his lungs though.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 16, 2012
at 02:49 AM

Weston Price or Perfect Health Diet should be possible and not too big of a leap for a lot of the elderly.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on January 16, 2012
at 01:49 AM

My dad was great - his age conditions improved very much on paleo but we had to move him into home for other reasons - they try to keep up the protein but protein is expensive when they can feed them bread and pasta all the time - so he slipped back into bad health - sad really because he would be so much easier to manage if he was well

A1081af52b61372dbb3ed572d88968f4

(425)

on January 15, 2012
at 11:24 PM

One additional thing to to think about is if he has to go to prepared food (abdominal tube) products. As you might imagine, nothing they make (that I can find) is close to paleo, but I did find a product from Abbott Nutrition called Optimental wherein at least the oils in it are marine/fish oils high in omega 3 instead of the others with are all soy, canola, etc. That one also is high in MCT's (28% of fats). More here http://abbottnutrition.com/Products/optimental

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 15, 2012
at 11:21 PM

I doubt that. Even if heeled you would probably need assistance with the diet, and possibly moving around if you eventually wear out joints.

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7 Answers

9
A1081af52b61372dbb3ed572d88968f4

(425)

on January 15, 2012
at 10:21 PM

Something quick and easy to try is coconut oil, or pure MCT oil (can buy at Amazon). Have seen good progress with my dad after about 2 weeks (he says his mind is clearer). See www.coconutketones.com for lots of information. Check Dave Asprey's podcast at www.bulletproofexec.com for interview w Dr. Mary Newport who runs that site and has had remarkable results w her husband. Also highly recommend the book "Stop Alzhemier's Now" by Bruce Fife. Not yet finished myself, but quite strong... And in the end the most practical thing is the coconut/MCT oil.

A1081af52b61372dbb3ed572d88968f4

(425)

on January 17, 2012
at 12:48 AM

I'm glad I added that then. My dad gets his gut tube in tomorrow. Hate to loose control over the eating, but am convinced that food/saliva in the lungs is a really bad thing. Really suggest you talk to the Drs/nutritionist about what's going in through that tube, and see if you can't make it better. Can't hurt to try?

A1081af52b61372dbb3ed572d88968f4

(425)

on January 15, 2012
at 11:24 PM

One additional thing to to think about is if he has to go to prepared food (abdominal tube) products. As you might imagine, nothing they make (that I can find) is close to paleo, but I did find a product from Abbott Nutrition called Optimental wherein at least the oils in it are marine/fish oils high in omega 3 instead of the others with are all soy, canola, etc. That one also is high in MCT's (28% of fats). More here http://abbottnutrition.com/Products/optimental

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 16, 2012
at 03:55 AM

My grandfather is actually eating this way I saw a bottle of something similar at the hospital. I dunno for how long, but his gag reflex is not working so this is routed into his gut. He does have a problem with saliva dripping into his lungs though.

6
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on January 15, 2012
at 11:28 PM

My grandmother is eating much healthier now that she's in a nursing home versus her own home. Many elderly people stop cooking healthy homemade foods for themselves and start eating microwave or TV dinners, crackers or other snack food. For these folks, just eating regular meals again with some meat and veggies is a huge improvement. My grandma now has to have a pureed diet and she eats pureed meats, veggies and fruits (they don't puree breads) with diabetic low sugar icecream for desert. Probably the best diet she's had in 10 years. And she is getting stronger and clearer-headed with many more lucent, good days. It's fabulous to see.

So, yes. The elderly can definitely improve even pretty severe dementia with improved nutrition. But I doubt it would be practical or even a good idea to remove all bread or beans, since most of the residents have spent 90+ years having a piece of bread with dinner. They would probably be upset and angry at the change and that type of stress isn't any better for them than the roll. My great aunt (grandma's sister) is in the same nursing home and the staff would pay miserably if they took her bread away. She has quite a temper and would be really upset at that type of change. And she wouldn't understand it either. A better approach would be to just get them to eat more of the good foods so they don't eat as much of the bad ones (an approach many paleo parents use with toddlers). My aunt has noticed the change in my grandma and she is sure it's because my grandma is now eating vegetables again. She gets that part and actively encourages my grandma to finish her meat and veggies at dinner.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on January 16, 2012
at 05:29 PM

My SNF purees EVERYTHING. Including bread. And jello. It occasionally gets a touch bizarre.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 16, 2012
at 02:49 AM

Weston Price or Perfect Health Diet should be possible and not too big of a leap for a lot of the elderly.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on January 17, 2012
at 03:28 AM

Yes, I agree that Weston Price would probably work with the elderly as far as their emotional and physical acceptance of the food choices. It would be nice to see!

6
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 15, 2012
at 10:28 PM

If the nursing homes go 100% paleo, three quarters of the people would end up leaving and going back to their homes!. That would be really bad for their bottom line, thus it could never happen....... Let's all now sing, John Lennon's "IMAGINE".

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 15, 2012
at 11:21 PM

I doubt that. Even if heeled you would probably need assistance with the diet, and possibly moving around if you eventually wear out joints.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on January 16, 2012
at 01:49 AM

My dad was great - his age conditions improved very much on paleo but we had to move him into home for other reasons - they try to keep up the protein but protein is expensive when they can feed them bread and pasta all the time - so he slipped back into bad health - sad really because he would be so much easier to manage if he was well

3
6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on January 16, 2012
at 04:12 PM

I worked at a skilled nursing facility. The budget for food was about $5 a day per patient. It would be hard to get anyone in that industry to consider paleo. There are so many reasons why it would not be accepted. The increase in food cost would be the leading excuse. Being out of the scope of practice would be another. Since the resident was not on Paleo before, then if you moved him to a paleo diet and say his dementia got better but his cholesterol went up. If he suddenly died and there was any possible correlation to the elevated cholesterol the SNF would be sued. You could try getting the Doctor to test for celiac's and see if they could at least due gluten free, but the endoscopy test may be to invasive for an elderly individual. You could als try getting it written into an advance directive but your assuming that someone is going to remember it. Your best bet is to speak to the Social Services Director or Director of Nursing and tell them he is allergic to grains, legumes, and dairy. They could put that in his food preference but there is no guarantee that he'd get fed any different. The type 2 diabetics got the same meal as the non diabetics they would just get a different dessert and the RD usually would make the recommendation to start them on insulin. You could try bringing him prepared meals from home but that is daunting to have to so up every day with food. If your wealthy there are SNF's that allow you to hire your own chef and provide a small cooking area.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 16, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Wouldn't the costs of say medical treatment go down in proportion if they ate better? They could grow a lot of the food at the facility if they have the land for it. Although you might be able to grow food indoors near windows.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 17, 2012
at 04:04 AM

How about a cheaper variation like Weston Price or Perfect Health Diet. The consumption of properly perpared grains would be cheaper, and bones shouldn't be that expensive. Type two diabetics being fed sugary foods is awful. I dunno why this continues.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on January 17, 2012
at 12:26 AM

We didn't even have room for all our wheel chairs. Skilled nursing you learn to do a lot with very little. In a nursing home you wouldn't want the costs of medical treatment to go down as that is what you bill out to medicare.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on January 16, 2012
at 09:05 PM

Growing their own food is probably not the most effective distribution of resources and workload. "if they have the land for it" is a big "if". Nursing homes are high density housing, and don't generally have the amount of land necessary to feed the residents to any significant expense. Plus, you're going to need to pay farm workers, and your food supply is very subject to chance. There's a point in between "grow everything yourself" and "ship everything from the southern hemisphere because it is in season there" where you can get reasonable quality in a cost and manpower efficient manner.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on January 17, 2012
at 06:29 AM

It was so morally conflicting to me to work there. Much of the treatments were the causes of the illness but there is so much regulation and so little money no one dares step out of the box.

6ec8d30130a6fb274871314533b5536b

(581)

on January 18, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Even with a limited budget, why wouldn't it be plausible? If they are feeding their residents protein, vegetables, and carbohydrates anyway... why can't they severely reduce their carbohydrate budget, and put that money towards more protein and vegetables? I think it just depends on what they cut out, and where they put the extra money. That, and they just need more education and a better understanding of paleo, heart disease, diabetes, dementia, etc... and the relation of these diseases to grains and sugar. The problem is that they are stuck in conventional ideals regarding nutrition.

1
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 27, 2012
at 04:30 AM

Well he died at 92. So didn't get to try the new food to see if that would improve him.

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on January 27, 2012
at 01:06 PM

Sory to hear about your granddad

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 05, 2014
at 08:54 AM

@primallykosher, sorry to hear about your grandpa. May his memory be for a blessing.

As for a paleo SNF, it wouldn't work in my state. State inspectors look at the menus and expect them to follow USDA guidelines, heavy on grains, light on fats. Whether the state inspectors would allow for someone's individual menu to deviate far from that is a question.

0
Medium avatar

on February 05, 2014
at 04:40 AM

Shoot...at 92 you should just eat whatever the heck you want to eat. There's not much time left to enjoy haha.

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