7

votes

Paleo Jews and practices?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 02, 2011 at 3:55 PM

I'm a Jew, though a fairly unorthodox one. Being relatively new to paleo, I'm enjoying the interesting thinking coming about as I look to the Tanakh on eating paleo, and how my better, healthier lifestyle fitsin with my faith. To any Paleo Jews out there - what have you learned? What in your practice have you abandoned, kept, or modified? Has going paleo changed how you think about G-d?

Edit: Has anyone read A Wild Faith or God in the Wilderness? Both are books about Judaism and nature.

9a783f1b60e2936f07f1f38fc62c11e4

(256)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:06 PM

Anthropology background? Seems like you've been versed in cultural materialism. Great answer!

2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

(3043)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:05 PM

Beef bacon? Eat that.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on August 26, 2012
at 06:01 AM

Interesting...I'll investigate!

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 26, 2012
at 03:34 AM

Nope but there is a Jewish marital arts called abir. Very very old and the head guy does shohet stuff and gardens I believe.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on June 12, 2012
at 02:49 AM

apolgies for a very delayed response. This was very well said. I especially like the point about Abraham being a shepherd. There are certain parts of Judaism that I have never really felt at home with, but the earthy and pastoral roots of the faith has long resonated with me. Todah v'shavua tov!

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on May 22, 2012
at 03:47 AM

You only need one set of dishes than.

5af4bc9d2c390b0bcad9524f149c1b4f

(1101)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:47 AM

I don't think faith should ever stagnate either, but we should do our best to not throw the baby out with the bath water, so to speak. I think there's still wisdom in limiting consumption of pork due to O-6s and other things, but eating the occasional bacon doesn't worry me too much. And my ultimate goal in terms of kashrut is to keep my body healthy and eating primally does that just fine (shellfish are like little mineral pills! They're awesome!) Shalom, Caleb! I appreciate the response. :)

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on March 19, 2012
at 02:03 AM

@red_leaf: thanks for contributing to this discussion. For me I find it to be an evolving practice. I don't believe that faith should ever stagnate, especially when traditional. Though I agree with you also that for me "fit for consumption [kashrut] = primal" Shalom!

5af4bc9d2c390b0bcad9524f149c1b4f

(1101)

on March 16, 2012
at 12:50 AM

I find no conflict between the two in my faith. I dislike labels, however it would also help if I noted I'm a woman and affiliate with the Reform movement, where wearing a kippah is a rare occurrence (though Reform is swinging back to a more traditional stance).

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on March 14, 2012
at 08:13 PM

If your eating shellfish why bother to wear a kippah?

2b4f887f5fd32a37c6038eb0aaaf3bf5

(1648)

on January 20, 2012
at 09:14 PM

Awesome, love this. How did the roman bra work out, by the way?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:42 PM

9 kids. I missed one.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:36 PM

I'm working on that connection so hopefully we can organize better. Thanks for stopping by I will check out the comment soon. I've always been kosher so its hasn't been to hard of a change, just trying to find the one thing that makes me lose the last 20-30 pounds is the trick.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:34 PM

There is a website of a women who lives in Israel who has 8 children. SHe follows WAPF and is in great shape. http://oceansofjoy.wordpress.com/

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 20, 2012
at 03:22 PM

I was on your website earlier today. Really good stuff! I'm glad to have found it. I try to keep kosher, but I find it hard in many cases. I don't know many Jews who share my lifestyle, in terms of diet, or different aspects of being primal.

020053fd576e93d1d8fa20bfb10979b9

(410)

on October 04, 2011
at 10:05 PM

And luckily you don't have to!

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 04, 2011
at 10:00 PM

I used to not eat kosher at all. The only time I enjoyed pork was bacon. This is why lamb bacon intrigues me. I could never give up lamb....

020053fd576e93d1d8fa20bfb10979b9

(410)

on October 04, 2011
at 09:58 PM

Those young women have extremely stressful lives. Taking care of large families takes its toll.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 04, 2011
at 05:01 PM

It's so depressing to see the Hasidic folks in Williamsburg. The young people, particularly the women, are often very very beautiful. But by the time they reach 30 it seems like all of them are overweight. I always see them buying all kinds of sugary carby snacks.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 04, 2011
at 04:59 PM

Beef belly is quite excellent.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 05:14 AM

Numbers 31:17-18 http://goo.gl/ENzTw

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 05:06 AM

@JS Paleo. I cant really answer without it seeming like a religious debate. As Im not religious I dont want to go there. Needless to say Moses advocated killing people to take their land, and killing the children of these conquered people except the young virgin girls who were to be kidnapped for sex. IMO many things written 3,000 yrs ago are now outdated.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 04:58 AM

If it made sense back then but is an inferior method now then why do it? Moses advocated killing all children and women of a tribe except for the young girls who were to be kept for sex (Numbers 31:17 - 18 http://goo.gl/ENzTw). But we no longer do this as it's seen as inhumane. It has been argued by many, including most countries in Europe that not stunning an animal first and just slitting it's throat is inhumane. But then again Im not religious...

39ccdc07ecb843b6399e0df9c1a6aa1a

(682)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:38 AM

Geoff: From what I have been taught, they slit the animals throat (jugular) because it was the quickest way to kill an animal and was thought to be the least 'painful' for the animal. That was always the way it was explained to me. Back in that time what would have been a quicker and more humane way of killing an animal?

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:07 AM

Kosher means to slit the animals throat and let it bleed to death. There are more humane ways to kills an animal. Kosher is just old tribal ideas, like the idea that they were some special race (which all tribes feel).

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 03, 2011
at 03:12 PM

Wild boar isn't particularly high in omega 6. Shellfish is some of the healthiest food around. There's no evidence mixing dairy and meat is bad for digestion. The laws of kashrut are random tribal restrictions and are not based on any enlightened or divinely inspired health virtues.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 03, 2011
at 01:14 PM

theologically I'm pretty aligned with the renewal movement, though I've yet to go to services at a Renewal temple. So I guess this makes sense! Thanks.

E71731506df3416144f7cb621e7aa704

(30)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:35 AM

Yes, I believe the cuts are the same. I've only had beef bacon - I've yet to try lamb bacon but it's out there and I am determined to get it one day. The beef bacon is good!

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 02, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Hmm, comes from the same spot as bacon on a hog? or just an equally fat-ridden section of the animal to make it like pork bacon? I don't know my bacon cuts on other animals, thus, curious.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 09:44 PM

seriously? lamb bacon? *swoon*

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 07:29 PM

I identify as neo-Hasidic, i.e. mystical but not Orthodox. Technically, I'm Conservative, but my practices diverge considerably.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 02, 2011
at 07:23 PM

I think St. Paul was the first "unorthodox Jew".

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 02, 2011
at 07:18 PM

What exactly is an "unorthodox Jew". Reformed, Conservative, I'm familiar with,but "unorthodox" . Pray tell?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 02, 2011
at 07:04 PM

Also I would recommend trying to get in touch with a local grassfed farmer and a local kosher slaughterhouse to see if you can do a custom order. I have a friend who is halal and I helped her do that with a halal slaughterhouse, however, I understand there are more smaller halal slaughterhouses than kosher. It's sad that kosher has become so consolidated, but there is a movement to bring it back to its roots. You should check out Hazon, as I believe they may have some info.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 05:53 PM

thanks for the links!

39ccdc07ecb843b6399e0df9c1a6aa1a

(682)

on October 02, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Olivia: you are right. should't have used definitely. It is true for me though. I changed it to possibly. : ). Melissa: You are right, not neccassarily the best advice but I think we can learn from the laws the same way Weston Price learned from traditional societies.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 02, 2011
at 05:39 PM

BTW anyone can edit this if they find another related question.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 02, 2011
at 05:30 PM

As a wise theology professor once said "The bible is not a diet book"

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on October 02, 2011
at 05:23 PM

There's no evidence (and it isn't plausible given how digestion works) that keeping meat and dairy separate is "definitely beneficial for digestion", and plenty of people eat those things together all the time with no problem.

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15 Answers

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1
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 03, 2011
at 04:15 AM

I am basically secular, but my mom is Renewal...she eats mostly paleo, and feels good about eating what she calls eco-kosher...grassfed meats, wild fish, etc. She feels that this fits with her spiritual beliefs, and wouldn't feel good about eating most modern kosher meats....her and I both don't eat dairy, so that fits right in there...I sometimes go with her to services, or shabbat dinner, and usually feel awkward about refusing the challah and the wine, I suppose if I were more involved, I'd come up with a nice substitute...

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 03, 2011
at 01:14 PM

theologically I'm pretty aligned with the renewal movement, though I've yet to go to services at a Renewal temple. So I guess this makes sense! Thanks.

7
D8795130729e173cfe9f3e2f6353becd

(446)

on October 04, 2011
at 04:42 PM

I am not Jewish, but I am fascinated by where cultural practices come from, among other funny little obsessions (I am the only person who has attempted to recreate and wear the ancient Roman version of the bra :-D), and this research forms a major part of my work today.

All in all, after all these years of research and living and working in other countries, I have come to the following conclusions ...

Almost all cultural facets and practices "make sense" in their time and geographical place for one reason or another, and these reasons are usually kinda practical once you discount the religious or traditional aspect. Take meat type: as a general rule, colder countries eat more pork and beef, warmer countries eat more lamb (and many have a prohibition on pork and some on beef).

Why is this? Well, it could be as simple as climate and economics. Populations in colder countries in the past required more fleece products for clothing, so people didn't consume so many sheep because they needed next year's fleece from those animals (and they didn't have as many flax sources for linen). Warmer countries didn't require so many fleece products, so they ate their sheep and they couldn't raise as many cows to create a major meat source because their countries' climate did not allow for long grasses to grow (this is one of the reasons why North Africans hardly eat any beef, despite there being no religious prohibition on the meat).

Colder countries with more hardcore climates seem to require more leather as well ... so what you end up with is colder countries eating more pork. Warmer countries end up eating more lamb and mutton.

Again, blood products are a bit of a disaster in a warmer climate where there is no refrigeration; in a colder country, however, this is not so much of a problem and they are a vital source of nutrients.

The pork prohibition is fascinating though, and, in fact, was the thing that sparked my interest in this field about twenty five years ago when I came across a reference to evidence that the pork prohibition among certain peoples in the Middle East is very, very old -- far, far older than people realise, like "start of civilisation in the ME" old. The hypothesis was that it possibly originated as a protectionist measure on the part of one sheep-rearing tribe who simply did not want to trade with another tribe who bred pigs. But, furthermore, when you look at other cultural connections -- honour cultures amongst peoples who live in mountainous areas and rely on wandering ruminants, how you keep certain livestock and what conditions you require to rise them etc -- you star to realise how keeping pigs does not exactly fit with a certain kind of lifestyle in certain conditions; in short, you can't really live in a mountainous or hilly area where there are other hostile tribes around.

However, the other side to this is that when you transfer certain cultural practices to another time and/or place, they can fail abysmally and end up as highly dangerous practices -- look at what happened to Indian vegetarians when they first came to Britain in the 50s; they suffered from chronic anemia because British fruit and veg had less animal residue than the fruit and veg in India.

To take another example: shatnez. To me, this makes a lot of sense when you consider older textile processes -- in short, it would be a bugger to wash. Wool, at the best of times, can be a nightmare. Ceremonial robes of other cultures that mixed linen and wool probably just wouldn't have ever been washed, and to the "cleanse conscious" early Jews, such an idea would have probably been anathema.

I have gone on a bit here :oD. Sorry, it's just that it is one of my obsessions and I can get a bit carried away.

So, to finish, you could argue that that kosher restrictions were kinda "paleo" if you consider that the spirit of "paleo" means consuming to the best of your ability, health and gene expression within a certain environmental context at a certain time. Had I been the member of an early nomadic tribe wandering around in the ME, I probably would have thought twice about mixing dairy and meat in the same meal for the simple reason that in a warmer climate, there's a risk of contaminating two lots of foods if either the dairy or the meat is off.

2b4f887f5fd32a37c6038eb0aaaf3bf5

(1648)

on January 20, 2012
at 09:14 PM

Awesome, love this. How did the roman bra work out, by the way?

9a783f1b60e2936f07f1f38fc62c11e4

(256)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:06 PM

Anthropology background? Seems like you've been versed in cultural materialism. Great answer!

6
485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

on October 02, 2011
at 11:06 PM

I am Conservative, not currently very observant, but fairly well educated in Judaism and grew up with observant friends. When I discovered the truth about diet it led me to believe that Judaism and the old testament are not paleo, and that the bible, while no doubt being inspired by God, was written by humans. It was well into agricultural times and I would suspect that people then had no idea of what lifestyle had preceded them. The bible is filled with references to bread and grains, wine and honey. Some of the healthiest people on the planet eat tons of pork and seafood, while in my estimation Jews keeping strict kosher suffer all of the diseases of civilization with the same frequency as the rest of the population.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 04, 2011
at 05:01 PM

It's so depressing to see the Hasidic folks in Williamsburg. The young people, particularly the women, are often very very beautiful. But by the time they reach 30 it seems like all of them are overweight. I always see them buying all kinds of sugary carby snacks.

020053fd576e93d1d8fa20bfb10979b9

(410)

on October 04, 2011
at 09:58 PM

Those young women have extremely stressful lives. Taking care of large families takes its toll.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:42 PM

9 kids. I missed one.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:34 PM

There is a website of a women who lives in Israel who has 8 children. SHe follows WAPF and is in great shape. http://oceansofjoy.wordpress.com/

5
3219f5b0673071f183dc66e0338b1daa

(86)

on October 02, 2011
at 05:58 PM

The worst part about keeping kosher is that I can't eat real bacon. As a wise rabbi once said about Paleo... "just eat real food... the rest is all commentary."

2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

(3043)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:05 PM

Beef bacon? Eat that.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 05:53 PM

thanks for the links!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 02, 2011
at 05:39 PM

BTW anyone can edit this if they find another related question.

3
39ccdc07ecb843b6399e0df9c1a6aa1a

on October 02, 2011
at 04:58 PM

Interesting question. It has made me look at Kashrut differently.

Don't mix meat and dairy --> possibly beneficial for digestion.

No Pork --> Maybe they knew pigs were high in 06!?.

Humane treatment and killing of animals --> health grass fed beef! Unfortunately kosher today only means killing commercial animals a certain way. But the idea to treat our animals humanely is solid.

No Shellfish --> Not sure about this one. Someone could probably argue that since they are bottom dwellers they eat the oceans crap and thus are unsanitary for us.

Holiday fasts--> mandatory IFing.

Unfortunately since I have been Paleo I have had to cook my grass fed beef downstairs and away from the upstairs kosher kitchen. (still live with my parents).

I think eating Paleo and Kosher is possible if you are willing to eat grass fed beef and decide that even though its not 'kosher' it is humanely raised animal and thus is really what kosher meat is all about.

EDIT: With the comments taken into account it does make more sense that these dietary rules were made more in order to separate Jews from socializing and mixing with other peoples rather than as healthy eating guidelines.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on October 02, 2011
at 05:23 PM

There's no evidence (and it isn't plausible given how digestion works) that keeping meat and dairy separate is "definitely beneficial for digestion", and plenty of people eat those things together all the time with no problem.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 02, 2011
at 05:30 PM

As a wise theology professor once said "The bible is not a diet book"

39ccdc07ecb843b6399e0df9c1a6aa1a

(682)

on October 02, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Olivia: you are right. should't have used definitely. It is true for me though. I changed it to possibly. : ). Melissa: You are right, not neccassarily the best advice but I think we can learn from the laws the same way Weston Price learned from traditional societies.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 02, 2011
at 07:04 PM

Also I would recommend trying to get in touch with a local grassfed farmer and a local kosher slaughterhouse to see if you can do a custom order. I have a friend who is halal and I helped her do that with a halal slaughterhouse, however, I understand there are more smaller halal slaughterhouses than kosher. It's sad that kosher has become so consolidated, but there is a movement to bring it back to its roots. You should check out Hazon, as I believe they may have some info.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 04:58 AM

If it made sense back then but is an inferior method now then why do it? Moses advocated killing all children and women of a tribe except for the young girls who were to be kept for sex (Numbers 31:17 - 18 http://goo.gl/ENzTw). But we no longer do this as it's seen as inhumane. It has been argued by many, including most countries in Europe that not stunning an animal first and just slitting it's throat is inhumane. But then again Im not religious...

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:07 AM

Kosher means to slit the animals throat and let it bleed to death. There are more humane ways to kills an animal. Kosher is just old tribal ideas, like the idea that they were some special race (which all tribes feel).

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 05:06 AM

@JS Paleo. I cant really answer without it seeming like a religious debate. As Im not religious I dont want to go there. Needless to say Moses advocated killing people to take their land, and killing the children of these conquered people except the young virgin girls who were to be kidnapped for sex. IMO many things written 3,000 yrs ago are now outdated.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 03, 2011
at 03:12 PM

Wild boar isn't particularly high in omega 6. Shellfish is some of the healthiest food around. There's no evidence mixing dairy and meat is bad for digestion. The laws of kashrut are random tribal restrictions and are not based on any enlightened or divinely inspired health virtues.

39ccdc07ecb843b6399e0df9c1a6aa1a

(682)

on October 04, 2011
at 01:38 AM

Geoff: From what I have been taught, they slit the animals throat (jugular) because it was the quickest way to kill an animal and was thought to be the least 'painful' for the animal. That was always the way it was explained to me. Back in that time what would have been a quicker and more humane way of killing an animal?

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 04, 2011
at 05:14 AM

Numbers 31:17-18 http://goo.gl/ENzTw

2
E71731506df3416144f7cb621e7aa704

(30)

on October 02, 2011
at 09:28 PM

Ron: But you can eat beef bacon and lamb bacon! And you can even get them kosher! Yum :)

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on October 02, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Hmm, comes from the same spot as bacon on a hog? or just an equally fat-ridden section of the animal to make it like pork bacon? I don't know my bacon cuts on other animals, thus, curious.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 02, 2011
at 09:44 PM

seriously? lamb bacon? *swoon*

E71731506df3416144f7cb621e7aa704

(30)

on October 03, 2011
at 01:35 AM

Yes, I believe the cuts are the same. I've only had beef bacon - I've yet to try lamb bacon but it's out there and I am determined to get it one day. The beef bacon is good!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 04, 2011
at 04:59 PM

Beef belly is quite excellent.

1
A41e7132894bd2d2f16d22d6359c893a

(110)

on May 22, 2012
at 02:26 PM

I think the only place where primal living clashes with Judaism is with the motzi on shabbat and holidays. Cutting that out hasn't affected how I feel about judaism or my relationship to it. I actually was gluten free for a few years before becoming primal.
I feel much closer to writings that recommend eating meat on shabbat and holidays to enhance your enjoyment. Eating with friends within primal guidelines is also easy since shabbat meals are my social life and those are usually based around meat. Kosher wise, yeah I can't have bacon, but I can have beef prosciutto, and grass fed meat isn't hard to find in Israel where I live.
Reading the bible; Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were shepherds and ate primally, it was only after the Israelites left Egypt that they became a farming culture. Even most of the ritual sacrifices in the temple were meat based, though one was grain based. So I think I am connecting to some really ancient ancestors by eating like they did.
That isn't why I do it though, I just want to be healthy. (though being healthy is also a mitzvah, I am told)
Also only having one set of dishes in the kitchen saves me a lot of space.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on June 12, 2012
at 02:49 AM

apolgies for a very delayed response. This was very well said. I especially like the point about Abraham being a shepherd. There are certain parts of Judaism that I have never really felt at home with, but the earthy and pastoral roots of the faith has long resonated with me. Todah v'shavua tov!

1
5af4bc9d2c390b0bcad9524f149c1b4f

(1101)

on March 14, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I've never found eating bacon and shellfish makes my kippah fit differently. I view eating primal as my way of keeping kosher and keeping my body in good health, which I feel is the intention of kashrut in the first place. :)

5af4bc9d2c390b0bcad9524f149c1b4f

(1101)

on March 16, 2012
at 12:50 AM

I find no conflict between the two in my faith. I dislike labels, however it would also help if I noted I'm a woman and affiliate with the Reform movement, where wearing a kippah is a rare occurrence (though Reform is swinging back to a more traditional stance).

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on March 14, 2012
at 08:13 PM

If your eating shellfish why bother to wear a kippah?

5af4bc9d2c390b0bcad9524f149c1b4f

(1101)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:47 AM

I don't think faith should ever stagnate either, but we should do our best to not throw the baby out with the bath water, so to speak. I think there's still wisdom in limiting consumption of pork due to O-6s and other things, but eating the occasional bacon doesn't worry me too much. And my ultimate goal in terms of kashrut is to keep my body healthy and eating primally does that just fine (shellfish are like little mineral pills! They're awesome!) Shalom, Caleb! I appreciate the response. :)

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on March 19, 2012
at 02:03 AM

@red_leaf: thanks for contributing to this discussion. For me I find it to be an evolving practice. I don't believe that faith should ever stagnate, especially when traditional. Though I agree with you also that for me "fit for consumption [kashrut] = primal" Shalom!

1
020053fd576e93d1d8fa20bfb10979b9

(410)

on October 04, 2011
at 09:55 PM

One of my dear teachers was rather insistent on not trying to find "reasons" for the rules of Kashrut or any other Biblical mandates for that matter. I think he was trying to make the point that it is not ours to reason why or why not. We either follow (to whatever extent we choose) these religious/cultural rules or we don't. And if we follow the rules it's because G-d said so and it's part of our cultural heritage.

Also, I am totally bemused by the bacon obsession in the paleo community but maybe that's because I don't know what I'm missing.

020053fd576e93d1d8fa20bfb10979b9

(410)

on October 04, 2011
at 10:05 PM

And luckily you don't have to!

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 04, 2011
at 10:00 PM

I used to not eat kosher at all. The only time I enjoyed pork was bacon. This is why lamb bacon intrigues me. I could never give up lamb....

0
F4348e5295bee9a16238c7aea1d206f3

on March 07, 2014
at 12:17 AM

If you look at kosher slaughter it is a very natural way of killing animals as opposed to the mechanized versions of today's slaughterhouse which often times use gas, electrocution and guns to kill animals. There is something very basic and deep in kosher slaughter that harness's man's technology and skill to reduce suffering while maintaining a connection to his primal roots when committing this act. I am actually working on some blog posts about the Jewish-paleo paradigm right now so I'd recommend tuning in if you're interested in learning more. My blog is about kosher slaughter and animal welfare but my great focus is seeing human animal relationships, foremost of those points of connection being the one in which we eat animals, through a Jewish lens and I think you might enjoy it... the blog's name is "The Kosher Omnivore's Quest" and you can check it out through this link www.thekosheromnivoresquest.com

0
B9df0f3d46f647fccf18e59cd8098e6c

on November 06, 2012
at 12:13 AM

I know this is an older thread but I am thoroughly intrigued. I have been trying to do Paleo for a while and In the last year my Husband and I have decided that converting to Judaism is the path for us. It is nice to see others on a similar Religious and Diet path. :D

0
C9d71b277630574dec26c79d5dfb8c1d

(0)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:05 PM

Check out KOL Foods. They sell grass-fed kosher meat from the USA.

0
99e07ac231e83a4705d866c7269e9282

on May 22, 2012
at 01:51 AM

Eating Paleo has not changed my thoughts/views of G_d in the least. I didn't eat pork/shellfish/skinfish prior and I still do not eat any "meat" that is considered unclean. And IMHO, I found that it's actually easier to keep kosher since I have cut out most of the dairy.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on May 22, 2012
at 03:47 AM

You only need one set of dishes than.

0
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:19 PM

I'm conservadox but not currently going to shul. Haven't felt comfortable recently in one. I still keep kosher ate home with separate dishes.

I'm trying to form a community around it since its hard to find Jewish people who are into this type of lifestyle. So far people have been contacting me at my website or through facebook. I have a link to my website in my profile. I do need to come up with an idea for an image that combines paleo and kosher and isn't sacrilegious.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 20, 2012
at 03:22 PM

I was on your website earlier today. Really good stuff! I'm glad to have found it. I try to keep kosher, but I find it hard in many cases. I don't know many Jews who share my lifestyle, in terms of diet, or different aspects of being primal.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on January 20, 2012
at 03:36 PM

I'm working on that connection so hopefully we can organize better. Thanks for stopping by I will check out the comment soon. I've always been kosher so its hasn't been to hard of a change, just trying to find the one thing that makes me lose the last 20-30 pounds is the trick.

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