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Paleo followers: cold weather areas, hot weather areas

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 28, 2011 at 5:21 PM

Do you know whether most paleo followers come from hot or cold areas? I am at the 34th parallel (mostly temperate year-round, hot summers) and I realise that some of the answers concerning which foods (specially fruits and vegetables) are available depend on the geographical location. So do the majority of paleohackers inhabit in cold (freezing) winter areas? How would regional weather affect paleo-life in terms of available food and physical activity? Also is it harder to live a modern paleo life in colder areas? Are there other factors like megalopolis, highways, or the access to natural areas that could make it easier/harder to lead a paleo lifestyle?

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on April 18, 2011
at 01:12 AM

As you said I am sure that weather, season, and geography do affect our bodies, although we do domesticate much of the variation through heaters, clothing and other devices. In temperate areas it is easier to live without that much technology. The strongest example is that if you live in Florida or California, when you restrict yourself to locally grown vegetables and fruits you sill have a broad supply, while in cold northern areas the local food restrictions puts a much heavier burden in terms of supply.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on February 28, 2011
at 06:22 PM

both diet and physical activities

F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on February 28, 2011
at 05:52 PM

Do you mean just Paleo diet or lifestyle re-enactment too?

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5 Answers

2
Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

on April 29, 2011
at 01:35 AM

I'm at the 43rd in Wisconsin. Nice cold winters and hot humid summers. It keeps the riff-raff out, so they say.

I try to eat as local as I can, although recently I've been getting some vegetables and organic broccoli and spinach from Costco. In the winter I was pretty much eating beef heart(I'm student, and beef heart is a cheap cut) cooked like Hungarian gulyas (basically with just onions and pepper/paprikas), and other meat that I was getting from my local farmer that does pastured/grass-fed and finished meats. Now that summer is approaching I'm looking forward to eating a lot of vegetables, and fruit. I pretty much try to eat seasonally, even though the current food supply allows me to eat a lot of different things regardless of the season.

Recently I started supplementing with Vitamin D, 10,000 IUs per day, in the winter, in order to keep my immune system up, and to make up for the vit D I'm not getting from the sun. I think it helped me, but that's pretty much just objective. I'm not taking it now that it's spring, I now try to get as much sun expose as I can.

One thing I have trouble with is minimal footwear in winter. I managed to find a cheap pair of boots that allow me to splay my toes, so I guess I'm happy.

Other than that, I get most/all of my exercise in inside of a gym during the winter. That said, I still manage to shovel snow fairly often, and run through some snow and such.

Living in the northern climates is really not that hard, you just have to get creative once the winter comes.

1
9fb6900af6e722fc80ab46782fa94e2c

on April 15, 2011
at 12:03 AM

Lat 38.6 N Lon 121.5 W

I doubt that anyone has counted Paleo followers or sorted them according to location, and even so, there are probably some people following Paleo who have never heard of it. I was one of them, on a gluten- and lactose-elimination diet, until I had the misfortune to discover gluten-free baking and the flours and starches that go with that. There's also the issue that Paleo is defined many different ways, so you could get different counts depending on how you define Paleo and how respondents understand your definition.

I've been questioning how much the climate of our Paleo ancestors influences our heredity today. Is it more Paleo to choose to follow seasons related to harvests and animal migrations, because our bodies evolved in such an environment? Some might say that is Paleo re-enactment and doesn't affect what our bodies thrive best on today, but I think the seasons are still inside the workings of our bodies, even when we mask the seasons with heaters, air conditioners, electric lighting, and food growing, transportation, packaging, and freezing that allows grocers to stock pretty much the same foods all year round. As you indicated, climate also affects physical activity, and I think it probably should affect how much sleep we get: less in summer, more in winter.

Some of us also mask our location. Much of California stays alive by virtue of irrigation and water diversions, and much of California's food production could not happen without diverting water to the central desert. Sacramento is covered with trees that were imported, and many gallons of water go to keeping those trees and their surrounding lawns and flower gardens alive, never mind the frequent drought declarations. The up side is that there are very few days when I won't do something because of the weather, since there is shade to mitigate the worst heat waves.

Thanks, I will be looking into Paleo migrations and climates and hoping some others here know more about the history and geography of our species and can provide more answers.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on April 18, 2011
at 01:12 AM

As you said I am sure that weather, season, and geography do affect our bodies, although we do domesticate much of the variation through heaters, clothing and other devices. In temperate areas it is easier to live without that much technology. The strongest example is that if you live in Florida or California, when you restrict yourself to locally grown vegetables and fruits you sill have a broad supply, while in cold northern areas the local food restrictions puts a much heavier burden in terms of supply.

0
1b81384cf6519d1fd092c293b050cd1f

(270)

on April 29, 2011
at 03:49 AM

I live in Texas at 31d latitude. Scorching summers, mild winters with the occasional frigid n'easter (even though it comes straight south from Canada). no matter. I can get every paleo food any time of the year. that doesn't matter either though. history has shown us that every hunter-gather culture has thrived with whatever natural food was available. Artic Inuits eat almost entirely fish and seal in the winter, and supplement with some berries in summer. Native Americans thrived off bison, deer, fish, berries, and other wild plants. People in the tropics thrive off tropical fruits and maybe pork or chicken year round. I do think infrastructure and climate can impact food selection, but we still more times that not we will have the option to differentiate crap food from good food, even if that means only eating seal blubber for a few months.

0
64fcf781e0862ae33d6d1fcb9674b44d

on March 18, 2011
at 08:32 PM

I'm also on the 45th parallel on the Great Lakes. Fish and wild game are abundant.

0
Medium avatar

(3259)

on February 28, 2011
at 06:22 PM

I'm at the 45th parallel on the North Atlantic. That means lots of fish and turnip in the winter.

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