2

votes

Ovo-Pesco Paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 28, 2011 at 2:39 PM

So to soften the financial blow of eating lots of local red meat, I am thinking about switching to an ovo-pesco type paleo diet. I'll eat local eggs, wild fish a few times per week, snacking on canned wild fish occasionally. The rest of my foods will be vegetables and fruit, including lots of coconut milk, coconut oil, and coconut everything else. I'll still cook my fish with kerrygold, and eat potatoes.

Anyone out there who has done this? Essentially i'm not paying for beef, pork, or chicken. I'm thinking my O3:O6 ratio should be nothing to worry about. I'll have to avoid over-eating mercury laden fish, eating them only sparingly. I'm still unsure how I should approach consuming saturated fat, protein, and carbohydrate. High fat, moderate protein, moderate carbs?

Loading sample menus into Cron-O-meter it seems eating this way should be incredibly healthy, what do you think?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 28, 2011
at 08:12 PM

So is there any info on this? I thought I read on one of these threads an argument FOR CAFO liver because it actually does not accumulate toxins, just processes em and has a high nutrient ratio to boot? Am I missing something?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 28, 2011
at 04:21 PM

Totally agree; liver + bivalves beats muscle meat every time.

1e36119906da54831601a7c23674f581

(698)

on October 28, 2011
at 03:03 PM

Great ideas. I definitely won't shy away from any other meat, this decision is mostly financial plus I enjoy the idea of how sustainable it would be. Raising chickens for their eggs and fishing on a regular basis is completely within my means. Raising cattle and pigs probably not. I already run a hydroponic (soon to be aquaponic) garden for vegetables and have plans for aggressive raised bed gardening. Worm-bin ATTACK!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:58 PM

You'll be fine. No one needs beef chicken or pork. They're good and I love them but there's nothing mandatory about them. Fish is awesome. Pretty much everyone should eat more of it anyway. Fish, fat, potatoes? Hell yes sign me up!

1e36119906da54831601a7c23674f581

(698)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:50 PM

Yeah it's kinda pricey. I'm thinking about few flanks of wild fish and canned tuna/smoked salmon plus local eggs should be cheaper. Emphasis on the yummy eggs. :)

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:50 PM

A 2-2 1/2 lb. grass fed chuck roast is $16.75 at my weekly local farmers co-op. Hamburger is $5-$7 per pound. Stew meat is $6-$8 per pound. You can get grass-fed meat somewhat cheaper by buying in bulk, but it is still expensive. I've been considering cutting back on our meat consumption, too, because it's starting to strain my budget--especially with the holidays rapidly approaching--and industrially produced meat is not an option I'm willing to consider.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:49 PM

probably around $25

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:48 PM

A 2-2 1/2 lb. grass fed chuck roast is $16.75 at my weekly local farmers co-op. Hamburger is $5-$7 per pound. Stew meat is $6-$8 per pound. You can get grass-fed meat somewhat cheaper by buying in bulk, but it is still expensive. I've been considering cutting back on our meat consumption, too, because my wallet just can't handle it and industrially produced meat is not an option I'm willing to consider.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 28, 2011
at 02:41 PM

How much is a 3-4 pound grass fed chuck roast these days in the states?

  • 1e36119906da54831601a7c23674f581

    asked by

    (698)
  • Views
    3.8K
  • Last Activity
    1281D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

4
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on October 28, 2011
at 02:54 PM

Others may disagree, but I think the benefit from grass-fed animals is less from the muscle and more from the nutrients in the organs and bones. So I think it's fine to avoid red meat because of cost.

I also think you can do quite well with seafood as a mainstay. In fact, I've just recently started to include more shellfish, as farmed shellfish (e.g., mussels or oysters) is generally safe and packs a higher micronutrient punch than most fish.

But I'd still consider trying to get some bones for broth and the occasional offal ... that shouldn't be too much of a burden on the budget!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 28, 2011
at 04:21 PM

Totally agree; liver + bivalves beats muscle meat every time.

1e36119906da54831601a7c23674f581

(698)

on October 28, 2011
at 03:03 PM

Great ideas. I definitely won't shy away from any other meat, this decision is mostly financial plus I enjoy the idea of how sustainable it would be. Raising chickens for their eggs and fishing on a regular basis is completely within my means. Raising cattle and pigs probably not. I already run a hydroponic (soon to be aquaponic) garden for vegetables and have plans for aggressive raised bed gardening. Worm-bin ATTACK!

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 28, 2011
at 08:12 PM

So is there any info on this? I thought I read on one of these threads an argument FOR CAFO liver because it actually does not accumulate toxins, just processes em and has a high nutrient ratio to boot? Am I missing something?

0
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 21, 2013
at 12:29 PM

Weird that eggs and wild fish are cheaper than meat where you are (or it's weird that my experience in the UK is the reverse).

Here 1kg ground beef (100% beef) is £2.92-5.00 (2630kcal, 200g protein) A dozen large eggs is £2.90 (1323kcal, 108g protein) Wild fish tends to be stupidly expensive. Even canned sardines are £5.40 1kg fish (1820kcal, 220g protein). Canned salmon is even more expensive.

Nutritionally your diet should be fine, though the eggs will be a bit protein and omega 6 heavy.

0
0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on January 21, 2013
at 12:00 PM

I follow a paleo-pescetarian diet but I don't eat eggs nor dairy. I posted a thread about it here and people gave me some really helpful advice and information: http://paleohacks.com/questions/171017/vegan-going-paleo-pescatarian-need-to-learn-basics-of-fish-meat#axzz2IbqAMZhY

Go for wild caught fish rather than farmed fish if you can. That said, some farmed fish/seafood is healthier than others. Check out Mark Sisson's article on this: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/farmed-seafood-safe-nutritious/

I seem to get excellent macronutrients on cronometer, so I don't really see the need to eat beef, pork or chicken. It seems to me that our paleolithic ancestors would have had more access to fish than to land animals, althoguh it probably depends on the region and people of certain origin will fare better on fish than others.

Denise Minger also follows an ovo-pescatarian version of paleo: http://rawfoodsos.com/2010/01/20/my-current-diet/

0
E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on January 21, 2013
at 11:16 AM

Ovo-pesco-lacto is what I'm on but I also supplement with whey protein isolate.

Best diet in my opinion.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!