0

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Old grains vs New grains

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 09, 2012 at 1:50 PM

So, while away on holiday I read a great book called 'Born to Run' by Chris McDougall, in which he makes quite a bit of a point about how native tribes in Mexico - specifically the ultra-marathon running Tamahura, have a diet that comprises a lot of grains. However, they suffer almost no western diesease ie. cancer, heart disease, diabetes etc.

Now, these guys run extreme distances up until their nineties, which may have an epigenetic effect on their metabolism, but they also have a diet that is often greater than 60% grain based.

This is pretty anti-paleo (as I understand it), but got me thinking....

Does anyone know, or has anyone heard about people comparing modernly farmed grains with what I would call 'original' grains. By that, I mean, grains that have not been selectively bred to increase yield, resistance to disease, etc etc? Is there a notable difference in lectin content?

Maybe newly developed grains (I'm talking past 100,000 years) are different, and not as damaging as their fore-runners?

If anyone knows anything, I'd love to hear about it.

Thanks

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:59 AM

I just found a wonderful website published by the Mexican government with great pictures and descriptions of dozens of varieties of Mexican corn. The descriptions tell you which ones are good for pozole and tortillas, i.e., nixtamalization. http://www.biodiversidad.gob.mx/usos/maices/grupos/OchoH/Ancho.html

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 10, 2012
at 05:55 AM

Wow, thanks - will do! :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:46 AM

I'm no expert but none of those look to me like cacahuazintle. Their so-called "Aztec" corn comes from New York which is a totally different climate from where the Aztecs lived. I think I found the real thing for sale on a Mexican website that ships internationally. Here's the link: http://thegreensshop.com/tienda/product.php?id_product=213 . If you want to search further in Google, look for "semillas cacahuazintle" or "semillas pozolero" or "giant white hominy seeds."

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:45 AM

I'm no expert but none of those look to me like cacahuazintle. Their so-called "Aztec" corn comes from New York which is a totally different climate from where the Aztecs lived. I think I found the real thing for sale on a Mexican website that ships internationally. Here's the link: thegreensshop.com/tienda/…. If you want to search further in Google, look for "semillas cacahuazintle" or "semillas pozolero" or "giant white hominy seeds."

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:42 AM

I'm no expert but none of those look to me like cacahuazintle. I think I found the real thing for sale on a Mexican website that ships internationally. Here's the link: http://thegreensshop.com/tienda/product.php?id_product=213. If you want to search further in Google, look for "semillas cacahuazintle"or "giant white hominy seeds."

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 10, 2012
at 05:04 AM

Yes, I'd noticed that the process seemed to be for different corn than the usual supermarket "sweet corn" varieties. I'd be getting it as seed and growing it from scratch - but these guys seem to have a few good heritage varieties to choose from: http://www.koanga.org.nz/shop/seeds/vegetables/corn I was thinking Kaanga Ma, Blue Hopi, Pink Hopi, Hokianga Red, Bloody Butcher, Black Navajo or Rainbow Inca (not sure which if any of those would be closest to the traditional cacahuazintle..) Hopefully any missteps may still produce safely edible results using the soaking method! :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 03:20 AM

NudgeWink, sounds like a fascinating experiment. The type of corn used for this is called cacahuazintle in Spanish. It may be difficult to find it for sale outside Latin America.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 03:19 AM

NudgeWink, sounds like a fascinating experiment. The type of corn used for this is called cacahuazintle in Spanish.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 01:35 AM

NudgeWink, sounds like a fascinating experiment! In case you don't know, this is normally done with field corn, not sweet corn.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 12:53 AM

Thanks Scotty. :)

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 10, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Awesome. Though I can get apple and oak, I might give it a go with some native woods from my corner of the world - chips from fallen branches of pohutukawa and manuka give amazing flavour. They might actually add extra nom-factor. Cheers again.

07243c7700483a67386049f7b67d90a4

on December 10, 2012
at 12:19 AM

In the first 3 references prior exposure to modern wheat could account for the greater toxicity. Nevertheless a fantastic post, really well thought out and succinctly put.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 11:55 PM

You're welcome NudgeWink. The ashes get boiled with food, so I'd want to use wood that is as free from toxins as possible. Your best best might be the kind of wood used for smoking food: clean hardwoods including cherry, oak, hickory, apple, etc. There are articles on the web saying that baking soda works, but only slowly. I'm not sure whether the results would taste the same as with pickling lime (calcium hydroxide) or other chemicals. Here's an article that goes into various chemicals a little bit: http://www.veggieobsession.com/2011/01/nixtamalization-making-posolehominy.html

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 09, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Thanks to both Robs for a fascinating question and answer. It's great to discover the possibility of "safely" trying a bit more of the local (traditionally prepared) cuisine when travelling South America, while still minimising inflammatory food exposure. The linked article mentioned avoiding construction waste - in trying this at home - would we also need to be mindful about what (untreated) material we've burned in the fire (eg. yard prunings, slightly insecticidal trees and shrubs, etc) with regard to any toxins and/or undesirable flavours imparted? Would baking soda & water also work?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 04:03 PM

Since the word "lime" was confusing I removed it from my answer and replaced it with "alkaline chemical." I also added a reference to a scientific study to the start of my answer. Here's an article about using wood ashes to nixtamalize corn in the traditional way: http://coldgarden.com/Cold_Garden_Warm_Kitchen/Nixtamalization.html

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 04:02 PM

f you live in the US, you can buy nixtamalized corn in almost any supermarket. Look for masa harina or corn tortillas. If you want to make it yourself, you can. But you can't use lime juice. That's an acid. When I said "lime" I meant the chemical, not the fruit. It's a base, the opposite of an acid. Traditionally Mexicans used wood ashes for this purpose. I suppose you could do it that way, if you want to be authentic, or you could buy pure food-grade calcium hydroxide, also known as pickling lime. If you Google "recipe nixtamalization" you'll find recipes and directions.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Here's an article about using wood ashes to nixtamalize corn the traditional way: http://coldgarden.com/Cold_Garden_Warm_Kitchen/Nixtamalization.html

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:54 PM

Since the word "lime" was confusing, I replaced it with "alkaline chemical." I also added a reference to a scientific study at the start of my answer.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:48 PM

Here's a recipe for traditional nixtamalized corn using wood ash. http://coldgarden.com/Cold_Garden_Warm_Kitchen/Nixtamalization.html

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:43 PM

I added a reference to a scientific study at the top my answer.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on December 09, 2012
at 03:39 PM

I don't think grains are grains. Modern wheat has a lot more gluten than ancient wheat, for example, and corn has none. Rice is a grain and has no toxins. All grains are different.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 09, 2012
at 03:18 PM

If anything grains, today have been bred to be less toxic. Bred for starch content, not protein content.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:06 PM

If you live in the US, you can buy nixtamalized corn in almost any supermarket. Look for masa harina or hominy. If you want to make it yourself, you can. But you can't use lime juice. That's an acid. When I said "lime" I meant the chemical, not the fruit. It's a base, the opposite of an acid. Traditionally Mexicans used wood ashes for this purpose. I suppose you could do it that way, if you want to be authentic, or you could buy pure food-grade calcium hydroxide, also known as pickling lime. If you Google "recipe nixtamalization" you'll find recipes and directions.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:02 PM

Lime juice is an acid, and nixtamalization uses the opposite kind of chemical, a base. You could use wood ashes. That's how it was done traditionally. Or you could buy food-grade calcium hydroxide (pure lime) and do it that way. But if you live in the US, you can buy nixtamalized corn in almost any supermarket. You can buy it either in form of masa harina (the flour used for corn tortillas) or hominy.

0f27c2d95e7d8e33c58297893ea45fae

on December 09, 2012
at 02:52 PM

What a great answer - plenty for me to get my teeth into! Really appreciate it, thank you. In particular this: Ray Peat reports that his students did experiments that showed that starch particles from nixtamalized corn, unlike those from untreated corn, do not pass whole into the blood stream. If true, this is a gigantic difference that has nothing to do with cultivars. Can you achieve Nixtamalization on your own by simply boiling the raw grains with lime juice, or do they are already pre-treated by the time you've bought them? Thanks again, Rob

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3 Answers

6
82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 02:40 PM

Question: ...has anyone heard about people comparing modernly farmed grains with what I would call 'original' grains.

First, lets look at the science. There are at least three scientific papers on this subject. In the first one,(1) The authors found that an ancient strain of wheat was not toxic to gut cells of celiac patients. In contrast, modern wheat was toxic.

In the second paper,(2) the authors found that newer cultivars of wheat are more likely than older ones to contain a celiac epitope. The authors conclude, "This suggests that modern wheat breeding practices may have led to an increased exposure to CD epitopes."

In the third paper,(3) which is the most recent, the authors compared the immunological effects of two lines of ancient wheat to those of modern wheat. The authors concluded that the ancient lines are probably "toxic to celiac patients. However, one of the two ancient lines is likely to be less effective in inducing CD [celiac disease] because of its inability to activate the innate immune pathways."

In addition, this editorial(4) from a peer reviewed journal is probably relevant, but I don't have access to it and there's no abstract.

William Davis, in his recent book Wheat Belly, argues at some length that ancient wheat may have been healthy but modern hybridized wheat is not.

You didn't ask about fermenting wheat to detoxify it, but this subject always comes up here in threads about wheat because of Weston Price, so let me also mention a paper about fermentation. The authors found that by fermenting wheat dough with a mixture of lactobacilli and treating it with fungal enzymes, the resulting bread was less toxic.(5)

And here's a review article about fermentation of wheat and rye in order to make it less toxic to celiac patients.(6)

Question: ...native tribes in Mexico - specifically the ultra-marathon running Tamahura, have a diet that comprises a lot of grains.

Traditionally, the grain eaten by Mexican Indians including the Tarahumara(7) was mainly corn (maize), and for the most part they ate it only after it was nixtamalized (boiled with an alkaline chemical; traditionally, wood ashes were used.) Nixtamalization changes corn's physical and chemical properties. This is what gives corn tortillas their distinctive aroma. Nixtamalized corn can be bought in modern supermarkets as masa harina (flour) or in cooked form as corn tortillas. Ray Peat reports that his students did experiments that showed that starch particles from nixtamalized corn, unlike those from untreated corn, do not pass whole into the blood stream. If true, this is a gigantic difference that has nothing to do with cultivars. He writes:

In 1979 some of my students in Mexico wanted a project to do in the lab. Since several traditional foods are made with corn that has been boiled in alkali, I thought it would be valuable to see whether this treatment reduced the ability of the starch grains to be persorbed. For breakfast one day, they ate only atole, tamales, and tortillas, all made from the alkali treated corn. None of the students could find any starch grains after centrifuging their blood and urine. That led me to substitute those foods whenever possible for other starches.(8)

Here's a picture of nixtamalized Mexican corn.(9) It is obviously quite different from North American sweet corn.

old-grains-vs-new-grains

Here's a video of a Central American woman grinding nixtamalized corn into flour by hand. As you can see, it takes a lot of labor.

YouTube video

There turned out to be some interest in nixtamalized corn in comments, so here's a picture of nixtamalized corn flour (called masa or masa harina) that you can buy in American supermarkets. Quaker brand contains only corn, lime, and vitamins (ingredient list: "corn treated with lime water and specially ground, niacin, reduced iron, thiamin monoitrate, riboflavin, folic acid"). Maseca doesn't seem to publish an ingredient list, but they say their product is "100% natural."

Incidentally (I'm getting pretty far away from paleo here, but what the heck) it's very easy to make delicious fresh tortillas at home from this stuff. All you need is a cast iron skillet and either a tortilla press (cheap) or a rolling pin. Traditionally, Mexicans molded tortillas with their hands, but it's an acquired knack.

And by the way, the word "nixtamalized" comes from Nauhatl, the language spoken by the Aztecs in central Mexico at the time of the Spanish conquest.

old-grains-vs-new-grains

References:

  1. Pizzuti D, Buda A, D'Odorico A, D'Inc?? R, Chiarelli S, Curioni A, Martines D. Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Nov;41(11):1305-11. PMID: 17060124

  2. van den Broeck HC, de Jong HC, Salentijn EM, Dekking L, Bosch D, Hamer RJ, Gilissen LJ, van der Meer IM, Smulders MJ. Theor Appl Genet. 2010 Nov;121(8):1527-39. Epub 2010 Jul 28. Presence of celiac disease epitopes in modern and old hexaploid wheat varieties: wheat breeding may have contributed to increased prevalence of celiac disease. PMID: 20664999 PMCID: PMC2963738

  3. Gianfrani C, Maglio M, Rotondi Aufiero V, Camarca A, Vocca I, Iaquinto G, Giardullo N, Pogna N, Troncone R, Auricchio S, Mazzarella G. Immunogenicity of monococcum wheat in celiac patients. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec;96(6):1339-45. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.040485. Epub 2012 Nov 7. PMID: 23134879

  4. Marietta EV, Murray JA. Epub 2012 Nov 7. Testing the safety of alternative wheat species and cultivars for consumption by celiac patients. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec;96(6):1247-8. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.051425. PMID: 23134892

  5. Rizzello CG, De Angelis M, Di Cagno R, Camarca A, Silano M, Losito I, De Vincenzi M, De Bari MD, Palmisano F, Maurano F, Gianfrani C, Gobbetti M. Highly efficient gluten degradation by lactobacilli and fungal proteases during food processing: new perspectives for celiac disease. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Jul;73(14):4499-507. Epub 2007 May 18. PMID: 17513580

  6. Gobbetti M, Giuseppe Rizzello C, Di Cagno R, De Angelis M.Sourdough lactobacilli and celiac disease. Food Microbiol. 2007 Apr;24(2):187-96. Epub 2006 Sep 12. Review. PMID: 17008163

  7. Cerqueira MT, Fry MM, Connor WE. The food and nutrient intakes of the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico. Am J Clin Nutr. 1979 Apr;32(4):905-15. PMID: 433816. Free full text.

  8. http://raypeat.com/articles/nutrition/carrageenan.shtml

  9. Picture from Wikipedia.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 04:03 PM

Since the word "lime" was confusing I removed it from my answer and replaced it with "alkaline chemical." I also added a reference to a scientific study to the start of my answer. Here's an article about using wood ashes to nixtamalize corn in the traditional way: http://coldgarden.com/Cold_Garden_Warm_Kitchen/Nixtamalization.html

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 03:19 AM

NudgeWink, sounds like a fascinating experiment. The type of corn used for this is called cacahuazintle in Spanish.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 01:35 AM

NudgeWink, sounds like a fascinating experiment! In case you don't know, this is normally done with field corn, not sweet corn.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 04:02 PM

f you live in the US, you can buy nixtamalized corn in almost any supermarket. Look for masa harina or corn tortillas. If you want to make it yourself, you can. But you can't use lime juice. That's an acid. When I said "lime" I meant the chemical, not the fruit. It's a base, the opposite of an acid. Traditionally Mexicans used wood ashes for this purpose. I suppose you could do it that way, if you want to be authentic, or you could buy pure food-grade calcium hydroxide, also known as pickling lime. If you Google "recipe nixtamalization" you'll find recipes and directions.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 11:55 PM

You're welcome NudgeWink. The ashes get boiled with food, so I'd want to use wood that is as free from toxins as possible. Your best best might be the kind of wood used for smoking food: clean hardwoods including cherry, oak, hickory, apple, etc. There are articles on the web saying that baking soda works, but only slowly. I'm not sure whether the results would taste the same as with pickling lime (calcium hydroxide) or other chemicals. Here's an article that goes into various chemicals a little bit: http://www.veggieobsession.com/2011/01/nixtamalization-making-posolehominy.html

07243c7700483a67386049f7b67d90a4

on December 10, 2012
at 12:19 AM

In the first 3 references prior exposure to modern wheat could account for the greater toxicity. Nevertheless a fantastic post, really well thought out and succinctly put.

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 10, 2012
at 05:55 AM

Wow, thanks - will do! :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:45 AM

I'm no expert but none of those look to me like cacahuazintle. Their so-called "Aztec" corn comes from New York which is a totally different climate from where the Aztecs lived. I think I found the real thing for sale on a Mexican website that ships internationally. Here's the link: thegreensshop.com/tienda/…. If you want to search further in Google, look for "semillas cacahuazintle" or "semillas pozolero" or "giant white hominy seeds."

0f27c2d95e7d8e33c58297893ea45fae

on December 09, 2012
at 02:52 PM

What a great answer - plenty for me to get my teeth into! Really appreciate it, thank you. In particular this: Ray Peat reports that his students did experiments that showed that starch particles from nixtamalized corn, unlike those from untreated corn, do not pass whole into the blood stream. If true, this is a gigantic difference that has nothing to do with cultivars. Can you achieve Nixtamalization on your own by simply boiling the raw grains with lime juice, or do they are already pre-treated by the time you've bought them? Thanks again, Rob

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:48 PM

Here's a recipe for traditional nixtamalized corn using wood ash. http://coldgarden.com/Cold_Garden_Warm_Kitchen/Nixtamalization.html

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 10, 2012
at 12:52 AM

Awesome. Though I can get apple and oak, I might give it a go with some native woods from my corner of the world - chips from fallen branches of pohutukawa and manuka give amazing flavour. They might actually add extra nom-factor. Cheers again.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:46 AM

I'm no expert but none of those look to me like cacahuazintle. Their so-called "Aztec" corn comes from New York which is a totally different climate from where the Aztecs lived. I think I found the real thing for sale on a Mexican website that ships internationally. Here's the link: http://thegreensshop.com/tienda/product.php?id_product=213 . If you want to search further in Google, look for "semillas cacahuazintle" or "semillas pozolero" or "giant white hominy seeds."

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 12:53 AM

Thanks Scotty. :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:59 AM

I just found a wonderful website published by the Mexican government with great pictures and descriptions of dozens of varieties of Mexican corn. The descriptions tell you which ones are good for pozole and tortillas, i.e., nixtamalization. http://www.biodiversidad.gob.mx/usos/maices/grupos/OchoH/Ancho.html

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:54 PM

Since the word "lime" was confusing, I replaced it with "alkaline chemical." I also added a reference to a scientific study at the start of my answer.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Here's an article about using wood ashes to nixtamalize corn the traditional way: http://coldgarden.com/Cold_Garden_Warm_Kitchen/Nixtamalization.html

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 03:20 AM

NudgeWink, sounds like a fascinating experiment. The type of corn used for this is called cacahuazintle in Spanish. It may be difficult to find it for sale outside Latin America.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:02 PM

Lime juice is an acid, and nixtamalization uses the opposite kind of chemical, a base. You could use wood ashes. That's how it was done traditionally. Or you could buy food-grade calcium hydroxide (pure lime) and do it that way. But if you live in the US, you can buy nixtamalized corn in almost any supermarket. You can buy it either in form of masa harina (the flour used for corn tortillas) or hominy.

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 10, 2012
at 05:04 AM

Yes, I'd noticed that the process seemed to be for different corn than the usual supermarket "sweet corn" varieties. I'd be getting it as seed and growing it from scratch - but these guys seem to have a few good heritage varieties to choose from: http://www.koanga.org.nz/shop/seeds/vegetables/corn I was thinking Kaanga Ma, Blue Hopi, Pink Hopi, Hokianga Red, Bloody Butcher, Black Navajo or Rainbow Inca (not sure which if any of those would be closest to the traditional cacahuazintle..) Hopefully any missteps may still produce safely edible results using the soaking method! :)

23d34842642ceb5996949f4a68afb585

(380)

on December 09, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Thanks to both Robs for a fascinating question and answer. It's great to discover the possibility of "safely" trying a bit more of the local (traditionally prepared) cuisine when travelling South America, while still minimising inflammatory food exposure. The linked article mentioned avoiding construction waste - in trying this at home - would we also need to be mindful about what (untreated) material we've burned in the fire (eg. yard prunings, slightly insecticidal trees and shrubs, etc) with regard to any toxins and/or undesirable flavours imparted? Would baking soda & water also work?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:43 PM

I added a reference to a scientific study at the top my answer.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 09, 2012
at 03:06 PM

If you live in the US, you can buy nixtamalized corn in almost any supermarket. Look for masa harina or hominy. If you want to make it yourself, you can. But you can't use lime juice. That's an acid. When I said "lime" I meant the chemical, not the fruit. It's a base, the opposite of an acid. Traditionally Mexicans used wood ashes for this purpose. I suppose you could do it that way, if you want to be authentic, or you could buy pure food-grade calcium hydroxide, also known as pickling lime. If you Google "recipe nixtamalization" you'll find recipes and directions.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 10, 2012
at 05:42 AM

I'm no expert but none of those look to me like cacahuazintle. I think I found the real thing for sale on a Mexican website that ships internationally. Here's the link: http://thegreensshop.com/tienda/product.php?id_product=213. If you want to search further in Google, look for "semillas cacahuazintle"or "giant white hominy seeds."

0
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on December 09, 2012
at 05:21 PM

Nice post here explaining how modern hybrid wheat differs from ancient wheats:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-problems-with-modern-wheat/#axzz2EZmXYwLU

I personally think small amounts of old wheats (spelt, emmer, einkorn, etc), properly prepared, can be part of a healthy diet.

-1
Bee4e0fda817da9857443bd40f552a75

on December 09, 2012
at 02:22 PM

Grains are grains.Earlier people ate fermented and soaked grains.Today grains are mainstream and it's mostly gluten-containing grains cause the problem,mostly wheat,oats,etc.Native Southern American tribes ate quinoa or amaranth or other grains in a form of wild grass.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on December 09, 2012
at 03:39 PM

I don't think grains are grains. Modern wheat has a lot more gluten than ancient wheat, for example, and corn has none. Rice is a grain and has no toxins. All grains are different.

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