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Nutrition Breakout for Backpacking

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 18, 2013 at 10:14 AM

I am planning a backpacking trip and wanting to stay paleo as much as possible. Should I be increasing my carbs or fat more to accomodate the moderate activity each day? Paleokits has a MRE kit that has considerable fat grams but I wasnt sure if I needed to focus more on food items that have more carbs instead

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 18, 2013
at 01:50 PM

got bored. I am sure there are more...

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on June 18, 2013
at 01:34 PM

That's only a baker's half dozen!

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 18, 2013
at 12:59 PM

how long are you going to be without access to a grocery?

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on June 18, 2013
at 12:24 PM

I usually have nuts to carry with me when on long long hikes, carbs/fat/protein all packed together, or just fast until dinner

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on June 18, 2013
at 11:43 AM

You asked this question in a comment here - http://paleohacks.com/questions/54256/is-there-a-fat-gram-rule-of-thumb/200282#200282 -- please don't cross post like that! Just be patient, and the backpackers and campers should come out of the woodwork to eventually answer your question.

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4 Answers

0
A777c9772a09024afd69728878e95bd7

on June 18, 2013
at 11:08 PM

Thanks for the info. Prior threads had mentioned specific foods but I couldn't tell of the focus was more on carbs than fat. I'll use this to adjust my meal plan.

0
C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

on June 18, 2013
at 12:46 PM

If you're concerned about optimal nutrient intake and calorie levels during multi-day hikes, I'd recommend picking up a dehydrator. They'll run $40-$80 on Amazon for most of the basic models (Nesco's stuff seem to have good reviews overall) but can dehydrate a full meal over the course of 8-10 hours or so. Dehydration offers a few main benefits over fresh food:

-Weight. Cutting the water out of food drops its weight considerably, especially when you're looking at starch sources like sweet potatoes (you can dehydrate sweet potatoes or regular potatoes and grind them into a flour that can later be reconstituted with water to make incredible mashed sweet/regular potatoes).

-Control: By dehydrating the food yourself instead of buying it, you control exactly what goes into it, allowing you to avoid any trigger foods you've got.

-Taste: Dehydration allows you to make the full meal beforehand, season it appropriately, then dehydrate it, so you can handle tasting back at home when you're not tired and wet after an 8-hour hike in the rain.

-Simplicity: Boil water and add your dehydrated meal. One pot meals, 15 minutes to make. You couldn't ask for easier cooking :)

I don't have the link on me, but if you google "Paleo backpacking dehydration" you should come up with a forum post from somebody who had great success dehydrating everything from a peppers and beef hash to omelettes, staying totally Paleo (except for the rice noodle pasta he made one time). I'd recommend looking up that post just to see how he figured out how much water to add back to the meal; it's essentially just weighing the food before and after, but it's important to get the # right if you don't want soupy or dry meals.

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on June 18, 2013
at 11:51 AM

For moderate activity that is going to last most of the day, I would focus on paleo carbohydrate sources. Fatty sources are good, especially if you are fat adapted, but frankly, when I'm out running around or bicycling outside all day, I generally want sources of energy that will digest and give energy a little faster than fat - carbs fit that bill. I feel that hiking would be similar to that situation.

I stick to pre-made, easy-to-carry tubers (e.g. baked yuca fries, some mashed sweet potato or plantain in a bag) and fruit.

If the backpacking is lasting more than 1 day (i.e. not just a day hike), then make sure to make your meals as round as you usually eat at home - albeit, probably easier to pack and carry. I'm a fan of canned fish when camping, as well as easy to carry, cut, and boil veggies like carrots.

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