4

votes

Natural allergy cure

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 11, 2011 at 4:02 PM

Although my health has improved greatly while staying on a paleo diet, I still, occasionally, have upper respiratory allergies ("hay fever") when I am overexposed to mold or pollen, as sometimes happens when you go out camping. There are a couple of natural remedies that I use (lemon, honey). I wonder if you know of some other good natural medicines for breathing allergies.

13f4ffd700358a716d1f4fc489deaa1a

on July 30, 2011
at 07:10 PM

brad what allergies did you have, and before u gave up fair where you a big dairy eater??

3a833804187fe8926214e6c0bd8a0766

(1023)

on January 14, 2011
at 04:41 AM

I've always been told that honey from a local farm will build up an immunity to local pollens. I remember trying it once, but I just couldn't eat honey everyday when prescription nasal spray takes care of it for me.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on January 14, 2011
at 12:56 AM

My bad- I'm sorry that I didn't see your comments! @sherpamelissa- you really only taste the honey, the comb itself is an odd texture and I keep swallowing bits by accident until it finally gums up. :-) Travis- I hope not, since my husband just swallows the whole thing instead of spitting it out! @David- excellent! I do like sage, so I'll keep that in mind for the next time.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 13, 2011
at 10:00 PM

The sage definitely works: I made a very strong sage tea for a cold I had once (pre-paleo) and within half an hour I was completely clear.

0b2182c5e61bf67f83b9c32de86d8d3d

(250)

on January 13, 2011
at 09:58 PM

Try to sample the pollen in a tiny amount before you buy very much. Some people have a severe attack if they consume too much and are sensitive. Second, try and find out if the pollen is spring or fall pollen. As beekeepers, we can trap pollen in either season; however to work, it needs to match what you experience symptoms with.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 11, 2011
at 09:35 PM

Eating raw honey with the comb is truly glorious. I wouldn't do it all day long, but it's the perfect occasional treat. There's nothing really wax lip-y about it. I can only imagine that ingesting a large amount of wax is a bad idea, but a little here and there can't be that bad.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 11, 2011
at 07:33 PM

I keep looking at the honeycombs and then not buying them. Is it like the wax candy lips of childhood? Or all honey deliciousness and then wax?

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on January 11, 2011
at 04:46 PM

Are you eating dairy at all? ALL of my allergies went away within two weeks of my giving up dairy entirely.

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6 Answers

2
0ee98c251b5eef357445aefec99c5d7b

(888)

on January 13, 2011
at 09:50 PM

Have you tried local bee pollen? Robb Wolf talks about it in the Paleo Solution Podcast 51, around 39:49.

0b2182c5e61bf67f83b9c32de86d8d3d

(250)

on January 13, 2011
at 09:58 PM

Try to sample the pollen in a tiny amount before you buy very much. Some people have a severe attack if they consume too much and are sensitive. Second, try and find out if the pollen is spring or fall pollen. As beekeepers, we can trap pollen in either season; however to work, it needs to match what you experience symptoms with.

0
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on June 15, 2012
at 06:29 PM

The GAPS diet is designed to specifically cure allergies. It focuses on removing allergens and all non-monosaccharides, so the only carbs allowed are very ripe fruit, honey, and nuts/seeds. The diet is mostly meat, fat, broth, veggies, and fermented foods or probiotics.

http://www.gaps.me

0
3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on June 15, 2012
at 07:38 AM

I second the vitamin C suggestion. I started taking additional vitamin C and B6 for other reasons, and my seasonal allergy symptoms completely disappeared this year. I credit the vitamin C (although it's certainly possible the B6 was contributory). Last year, I was using prescription fluticasone, but this year I didn't need to use anything at all. (I began supplementing vitamin D two years ago, and have been sporadic about omega 3s for the same time period, so I can't attribute the dramatic improvement this year to either D or omega 3s, although I'm sure they could be helpful.)

0
26f1c6e9fbecc4ac6948f8f395979a81

(503)

on January 14, 2011
at 02:37 AM

Try drinking Rooibos or red tea. It's a traditional African remedy for allergies and, anecdotally, it's worked for me.

0
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 13, 2011
at 10:01 PM

As others have suggested, reducing things that are potentially allergenic/immunogenic is the most important thing, but also taking large doses of vitamin C might reduce the histamine. Adequate vitamin A and D are of course also a good idea for anything immunity related (can't hurt anyway). Similarly, if the problem is at all inflammatory (I don't know if it is in this case) then more omega 3 is also advisable.

0
E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

on January 11, 2011
at 07:27 PM

Raw milk and cutting out processed foods and cutting way down on grains (the second two are already taken care of for paleos) made my usually unbearable seasonal allergies barely noticeable. On the few days that my allergies got really bad, I'd chew on a bit of honeycomb. I'd read somewhere that it's the honeycomb, not the honey itself that helps with allergies, and I've found it to be true for myself. Supposedly chewing on it releases whatever chemical that's effective, and once you've chewed it into a hard little wax ball, you can just spit it out. I'm not sure if honey with the comb blended in would do the same or not, but if you're already using honey, it might be worth a try.

I've also read somewhere that chewing on sage (even dried, culinary sage) will help dry up a runny nose, but I haven't tried that one yet.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 11, 2011
at 09:35 PM

Eating raw honey with the comb is truly glorious. I wouldn't do it all day long, but it's the perfect occasional treat. There's nothing really wax lip-y about it. I can only imagine that ingesting a large amount of wax is a bad idea, but a little here and there can't be that bad.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 13, 2011
at 10:00 PM

The sage definitely works: I made a very strong sage tea for a cold I had once (pre-paleo) and within half an hour I was completely clear.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 11, 2011
at 07:33 PM

I keep looking at the honeycombs and then not buying them. Is it like the wax candy lips of childhood? Or all honey deliciousness and then wax?

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on January 14, 2011
at 12:56 AM

My bad- I'm sorry that I didn't see your comments! @sherpamelissa- you really only taste the honey, the comb itself is an odd texture and I keep swallowing bits by accident until it finally gums up. :-) Travis- I hope not, since my husband just swallows the whole thing instead of spitting it out! @David- excellent! I do like sage, so I'll keep that in mind for the next time.

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