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More evidence that dispels the 'out of Africa' scenario--Your thoughts?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 08, 2012 at 1:33 AM

Israeli archaeologists uncovered teeth from modern Homo sapiens dating approximately 400,000 years ago. If we DID end up coming from the Middle East/Delta region, and not Africa, could this change the way we look at Paleo/Prima/Ancetral eating?

Wasn't that region pretty lush during that period?

World's Oldest Human Teeth?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 10:55 AM

I imagine alot of the water soluble minerals get spread around by evapouration, decomposition etc. Not even sure why there is more in the ocean, perhaps just because its the largest body of water and everything drains into there.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 10:50 AM

Fair enough. It is proximate to the sea but may be found other places. If the sea had flooded an area it is more likely. Thus the Thames Valley and English countryside will have more in its soil than say Nebraska.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 04:06 AM

So, no its not just a coastal mineral.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 04:05 AM

For example - english walnuts have about 9mcg of iodine (per 100grams). Dairy products have it. Chicken eggs have about 23-50mcgs. Spinach has some amount, i think about 2-9mcgs. Depending on the local soil of course. Freshwater fish have about 8-10mcgs. Carrots may have about 20mcgs. Even my local municipal drinking water has about 10-20mcg/L.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 04:02 AM

^ All food has some iodine in it. Its in the soil, and its in the rivers. Varying degrees, but its there, so long as the soil has minerals, coastline or not (though there is more in the sea, the amount in seafood and seaweed is way larger than the RDA needs of people). I was had a hyperthyroid blood result, so ive researched this in pretty good detail.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 03:13 AM

Only on the coastline Jamie

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 03:13 AM

Although we do have an enzyme for a polysaccride (sp) only found in seaweed.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 03:12 AM

Iodine is in the soil, not just the ocean.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on August 08, 2012
at 03:12 AM

I don't understand why this, whether true or not (and I'm leaning towards not accurate) would influence Paleo/Primal eating styles.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 03:07 AM

I just noticed the dateline. That article is 18 months old. There are no anthropologists that I know of that take this age for H. sapiens seriously. The picture is of a lower left 1st (or perhaps 3rd) molar. If that was actually the first evidence of our species, they should be holding it with gloves on. From experience I don't place much credit in articles that use words like "may" and "Could"or have question marks in their titles. I much prefer "is" or "is not" Much less speculation involved.

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1 Answers

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2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 02:53 AM

No. We are defined as "human" by our genus, Homo. It is 2.5 million (aprox) years old. These are not the "oldest" human remains but you can't sue a journalist for malpractice for some reason. Our species, H sapiens is 250,000 years old. These cannot be H sapiens teeth at that age but they can be considered human. The best evidence for the out of Africa theory is mitochondrial DNA. That clearly shows we made it to Asia across the Red Sea to Yemen. Sea levels were lower. It is true that some fossils have been found in The Sinai and Israel but anthropology considers this an evolutionary dead end as they did not progress any further.

The OOA theory states that we followed the coastline. We are most adapted to eat what is on the coast and the inter-tidal zone. The best evidence for this is our dependence on iodine and our complete inability to store it. Follow the evidence.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 03:13 AM

Only on the coastline Jamie

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 04:05 AM

For example - english walnuts have about 9mcg of iodine (per 100grams). Dairy products have it. Chicken eggs have about 23-50mcgs. Spinach has some amount, i think about 2-9mcgs. Depending on the local soil of course. Freshwater fish have about 8-10mcgs. Carrots may have about 20mcgs. Even my local municipal drinking water has about 10-20mcg/L.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 10:55 AM

I imagine alot of the water soluble minerals get spread around by evapouration, decomposition etc. Not even sure why there is more in the ocean, perhaps just because its the largest body of water and everything drains into there.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 03:07 AM

I just noticed the dateline. That article is 18 months old. There are no anthropologists that I know of that take this age for H. sapiens seriously. The picture is of a lower left 1st (or perhaps 3rd) molar. If that was actually the first evidence of our species, they should be holding it with gloves on. From experience I don't place much credit in articles that use words like "may" and "Could"or have question marks in their titles. I much prefer "is" or "is not" Much less speculation involved.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 03:13 AM

Although we do have an enzyme for a polysaccride (sp) only found in seaweed.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 04:06 AM

So, no its not just a coastal mineral.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 03:12 AM

Iodine is in the soil, not just the ocean.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 08, 2012
at 04:02 AM

^ All food has some iodine in it. Its in the soil, and its in the rivers. Varying degrees, but its there, so long as the soil has minerals, coastline or not (though there is more in the sea, the amount in seafood and seaweed is way larger than the RDA needs of people). I was had a hyperthyroid blood result, so ive researched this in pretty good detail.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on August 08, 2012
at 10:50 AM

Fair enough. It is proximate to the sea but may be found other places. If the sea had flooded an area it is more likely. Thus the Thames Valley and English countryside will have more in its soil than say Nebraska.

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