5

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mag ratio for paleo minerals

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 28, 2011 at 9:57 PM

How can we integrate these points:

  1. Calcium/Magnesium has an optimum ratio - perhaps 2:1 (ive seen this elsewhere as well): http://nutritionbreakthroughs.posterous.com/studies-confirm-best-calciummagnesium-ratio-d

E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on September 05, 2012
at 06:03 PM

If you are looking for marrow bones from grassfed animals I highly recommend getting to know a farmer and letting them know what you are looking for. You can either buy a part of a cow or a whole one and have all the bones saved for you or the farmer may be able to get you the bones the next time he has a cow butchered.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 29, 2011
at 10:47 PM

Vit D council had a discussion a while back about how vit D reduces the need for calcium. There was a study supporting this that was published within the last few years. I'll let you poke around to find them yourself if you're so motivated.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:32 AM

I'm sorry, but I do not believe that this whole statement is true. The part about acidity might be true, but the fact that "we get no calcium from dairy" is false. My teeth were VERY happy after eating my home-made probiotic yoghurt that day. I know they were, because the tooth "pain" (it was more like an itching), and cravings, died off within a few minutes of consuming diary. I know there are a lot who try to push down dairy, but goat dairy is not nearly as bad as cow dairy.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:19 AM

The calcium from dairy is not worth much, because it it used to neutralize the acid content from the milk. Hence the "I get my calcium from dairy" argument fails.

33907fee54e98865a1988e5eef59147e

(480)

on November 28, 2011
at 11:15 PM

? the point of the question was to reconcile the fact that different sources suggest different answers about that. If you are just stating your opinion, great, please provide a source if otherwise.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 28, 2011
at 10:52 PM

Taking vitamin D reduces, not increases, the amount of calcium need from diet.

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1 Answers

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3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on November 28, 2011
at 10:12 PM

I will go against popular wisdom here and say that the Paleo recommendation for calcium is too low. Sure, the paleolithic people didn't have goats or cows with them, but they had lots of bone broths, and ate all the marrow from bones. Today, it's hard enough to find good grass-fed marrow bones (I can't find them), and we definitely don't eat all parts of the animal (not even hard-core Paleo people do). Therefore, it's my opinion that either supplementing with calcium, or eating dairy is a must. So it's not a matter that paleolithic people didn't need to supplement, but the modern society is such that we must. At least for most of us.

After going Paleo, I personally supplement with calcium occasionally, and I also eat dairy. However, I don't go for random dairy. I go for goat-only (closer to human's milk), and I only eat lactose-free probiotic kefir, home-made probiotic lactose-free yoghurt, and hard cheeses (which are lactose-free too -- no, I'm not allergic to lactose, I just avoid it to lower sugars). From cows I only eat butter and lactose-free sour cream. I don't do runny milk (when I want plain milk, I go for coconut beverages with added calcium in them). This has fixed a number of problems with my teeth (mostly sensitivity, and being transparent).

In fact, I remember when I was at the dentist last month for a routine cleaning, and when I came back, my teeth were in such a stress, that they were itching for calcium (I had an urge to drink random milk out of a carton like no other). I had to have quite some calcium that day to make my teeth happy. That day, I was calcium-depleted, even if I was supplementing/eating dairy! Which means to me that we really don't get enough in a modern diet. And yes, I also supplement with magnesium, K2 and D3, so this was NOT a case of "not absorbing" calcium. That was a case of depletion instead.

Either that, or the paleolithic people really needed calcium too, and they couldn't find enough. Just because they were "paleolithic" doesn't make them perfect in their food choices, simply because they might not have had a choice. Whose to say that the paleolithic people didn't eat eggshells too, just like most animals do when they eat eggs? One hen eggshell has as much calcium one needs for 1 day! But who eats eggshells today? NO ONE.

That's why I suggest that the conditions these people lived by are not the same as we live today. Today, we need to supplement with calcium, or eat dairy, no matter what "mainstream Paleo" says we should do. At least my own body tells me that it needs more calcium than it has in its reserves.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:32 AM

I'm sorry, but I do not believe that this whole statement is true. The part about acidity might be true, but the fact that "we get no calcium from dairy" is false. My teeth were VERY happy after eating my home-made probiotic yoghurt that day. I know they were, because the tooth "pain" (it was more like an itching), and cravings, died off within a few minutes of consuming diary. I know there are a lot who try to push down dairy, but goat dairy is not nearly as bad as cow dairy.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:19 AM

The calcium from dairy is not worth much, because it it used to neutralize the acid content from the milk. Hence the "I get my calcium from dairy" argument fails.

E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on September 05, 2012
at 06:03 PM

If you are looking for marrow bones from grassfed animals I highly recommend getting to know a farmer and letting them know what you are looking for. You can either buy a part of a cow or a whole one and have all the bones saved for you or the farmer may be able to get you the bones the next time he has a cow butchered.

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