6

votes

longevity and the paleo diet

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 21, 2011 at 7:54 AM

Can eating paleo modify our epi genome making us younger as we get older? in worm studies, caloric restriction reduces insulin to increase lifespan. In Paleo man carbohydrates and not calories are restricted but because the hemoglobin A1c levels are much lower i suspect insulin is also reduced mimicking starvation. i suspose time will tell.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on December 29, 2011
at 01:01 AM

Michael Rose has a lot of interesting things to say on this. http://thesciencenetwork.org/programs/diet-aging-and-metabolism/michael-rose -

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:20 PM

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12054192 cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/news/0406/6.htm www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15153176 Are just a few.

D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:15 PM

There's a lot more evidence for a higher metabolic rate (which would be including carbohydrate) as opposed to a lower metabolic rate (i.e. Rosedale style reduced T3) for longevity.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on December 21, 2011
at 02:55 PM

If you haven't already, you might want to check out Ron Rosedale's and Quilt's commentary on previous longevity threads.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on December 21, 2011
at 02:03 PM

Somebody claimed the worms in those studys have something like a "hibernation" gene (that can be manipulated with insulin) and that humans do not have a comparable gene. Other people have claimed that the calorie restriction in rats requires that the protocal be implemented in the very young and that very little appreciable longevity benefit is obtained if it is begun as an adult.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 21, 2011
at 12:52 PM

"In Paleo man carbohydrates and not calories are restricted" ... I think that's up for debate.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on December 21, 2011
at 12:38 PM

plus one.......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on December 21, 2011
at 12:38 PM

Aging is decidely not paleo. It is a biologic and evolutionary novelty and the rules that govern it appear to be as counterintuitive as one might expect to the primal template. The human and primate research is showing us that what we do as younger humans is not what we should do as we reach for our aging potential.

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2 Answers

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Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 21, 2011
at 12:34 PM

What we eat and do in this lifetime will change our personal outcomes, but I'm dubious of an effect on personal genetics, which would affect our descendants rather than us. I agree with anonymous that we can increase our longevity most by taking action to reduce chronic risks. Control of obesity doesn't require genetic modification.

1
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on December 21, 2011
at 11:48 AM

It's a good question, Evzone. You might find some good discussion in some other threads here on the topic. Clicking on your tag "longevity" brings up some good stuff.

I believe that it's pretty clear that addressing the things that we know are killing us, such as heart disease and diabetes, through diet and lifestyle, will result in increased quality and quantity.

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