1

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Liver and eating fat

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 05, 2012 at 6:48 AM

hi

Isn't 50%+ of fat from your diet really taxing on your liver?

How do you know that your liver is still working correctly after masses of fat being eaten?

thanks

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 16, 2012
at 07:50 AM

I think you are getting this confused with a condition called fatty liver. Which could be caused by a number of things, including insulin resistance. so high fat/protein would be better, because you keep your sugar levels a little more stable. Anyway excess carbs are converted to triglycerides and could lead to insulin resistance which I think increase your chances of getting this? I dunno never looked into it. I always wonder if the body so easily converts carbs into triglycerides because it's the fuel the body originally wanted? Also fat is less glycating than carbs as energy :)

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 16, 2012
at 07:41 AM

my favorite too

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:51 PM

:) thanks for the answer though

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:46 PM

Not annoyed, but perplexed. :)

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:18 PM

hi, im sorry but i don't know much about it hence why i asked the question, sorry if it annoyed you in any way. And thanks for the answer, makes sense.

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on September 05, 2012
at 10:39 AM

I mean isnt a lot of fat more taxing on the liver or does all protein, carbs do the same taxing effect as fat would do on the liver?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 05, 2012
at 07:26 AM

What do you mean exactly? Why would dietary fat be worse than dietary protein, or dietary carbohydrate?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 05, 2012
at 07:16 AM

I am not sure what you mean exactly. All stored, burnt or converted energy goes through the liver. The liver does ALOT of things. Why would fat be especially taxing versus fructose, sugars, protein conversion, toxin metabolism etc? Perhaps if you gave us some indication of why you think dietary fat is especially taxing on the liver versus all the other jobs it does?

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5 Answers

best answer

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 05, 2012
at 12:05 PM

Why would it be any more taxing on the liver than a huge carbohydrate load would be on the pancreas? Or a huge protein load on the kidneys? Why do folks assume the body is some fragile thing, incapable of being resilient and adaptable?

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:51 PM

:) thanks for the answer though

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:18 PM

hi, im sorry but i don't know much about it hence why i asked the question, sorry if it annoyed you in any way. And thanks for the answer, makes sense.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:46 PM

Not annoyed, but perplexed. :)

3
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 05, 2012
at 10:15 AM

Only if you're not producing enough bile acids, in which case, you can either switch your fat source to something like coconut oil, which is about 50% Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) - they digest without requiring bile by getting turned into ketones, or you can supplement with ox-bile.

It's very easy to know when it's not working, look at the Bristol stool chart. You want type 4 poops - that is long and smooth and sinking. If they float, the fat isn't being digested properly. Ditto for the other types by degree (although other factors can cause them.) You also don't want them to look pale in color.

I myself don't have a gall bladder and regularly eat a very low carb/high fat diet, mostly from coconut oil, coconut butter/milk/cream, ghee/butter, bacon, avocado, extra virgin olive oil, (as well as mixed salad greens, various meats/fish/shellfish) and while I supplement with digestive enzymes, I normally produce type 4's - so it's not that hard on the liver, even for someone without a gallbladder.

I also do a 16/8 Intermittent Fasting (IF) almost daily - except on the day after heavy work outs, meaning I skip breakfast, so there's plenty of time to allow for autophagy and healing.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 16, 2012
at 08:58 AM

Depends entirely on the fat.

If those fats are trans-fatty acids and processed vegetable oils devoid of their natural vitamin E content, then yes.

If those fats are from fish, ruminants (preferably grass nibblers), cold pressed seed oils, coconuts, and non-rancid nuts, then no.

Poultry and pork are sort of a gray area, depending on what they were fed.

Livers also filter out environmental toxins, so even if you are eating pastured ruminants, if they live next door to a farm with a lot of pesticide overspray, or a downwind from a factory with uncontrolled emissions, you could still potentially end up with an unhappy liver on your hands.

One of the most taxing things on the liver is chronic overconsumption of concentrated fructose, so eating a box of Girl Scout cookies washed down by a Big Gulp would be a mean thing to do to your liver.

1
599feb9ad716266e8eb5030cd82d5dcd

(229)

on September 05, 2012
at 07:46 AM

I suggest reading a good paleo book if you haven't already, I recommend Primal Body, Primal Mind which is one of my favourites.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 16, 2012
at 07:41 AM

my favorite too

0
F86f2d058989729bc73a5355803a357b

on September 16, 2012
at 07:35 AM

I think most people can handle the 3macronutrients well if they are not denatured. Fat, CHO or protein as long as it is unprocessed or stable in the form eaten most people can handle it. Of course, I understand that certain groups of foods cause problems in some people. There is also the genetic and epigemetic history of an individual. When I mention stable, an example would be PUFAS .....great for most in their natural form.... Not heated or hydrogenated as they are a large component of cell membranes. Plenty more to say but it,s damn hard typing on this iPad with 2kids at me for attention.

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