4

votes

lentils, chickpeas and pressure cooking

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 23, 2011 at 3:08 AM

I understand there are several toxins in lentils and chickpeas: lectins, phytates, saponin, etc. I have heard that soaking and then pressure cooking them destroys most of these toxins. Do you know of any good source to understand whether that is accurate or not? If I could find a reasonable method to deactivate these toxins I would still not have lentils as a staple, but rather use them to, once in a while, make some tasty hummus. Any thoughts?

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:31 PM

There's tons of stuff on google scholar or pubmed - try searching for "lectins pressure cooking". I'd give you some links, but it's hard for choose some objectively. On a second browse, it seems even saponins are susceptible to pressure cooking; the combination of heat and pressure does them in.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on January 25, 2011
at 05:12 PM

thanks Jay any source to understand how this works?

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on January 23, 2011
at 02:33 PM

Thanks, I have not had any legume or legume based food in 6 months

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 23, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Well be careful not to clog the vent if you pressure cook them- I have seen restoration jobs from lentils clogging the vent and blowing the cooker up!

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on January 23, 2011
at 03:25 AM

Added the "legumes" tag.

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5 Answers

2
902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 25, 2011
at 05:20 AM

From what I've gathered, the combination of soaking and pressure cooking leave saponins as the only serious issue. Soaked and rinsed legumes have fewer "foaming" problems in the pressure cooker, and adding a small amount of oil/ghee can help with this as well.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:31 PM

There's tons of stuff on google scholar or pubmed - try searching for "lectins pressure cooking". I'd give you some links, but it's hard for choose some objectively. On a second browse, it seems even saponins are susceptible to pressure cooking; the combination of heat and pressure does them in.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on January 25, 2011
at 05:12 PM

thanks Jay any source to understand how this works?

1
034c678bff434ab3781e3f1771018af9

(279)

on January 24, 2011
at 08:31 PM

I think the anti-lectin line is overstated. It's interesting, but there's no reason to think you're going to be seriously injured by eating these.

1
C1c86f42410cd4788bd9c5cf801dcd8f

(2246)

on January 23, 2011
at 11:25 AM

I've heard that soaking them helps get rid of a lot of the toxins, have not heard of the pressure cooking.

I think your best bet really if it is something that you want in your diet, would be to take the whole9life aproach.

Remove the stuff for 30 days, then try some of it in your diet, if you feel ok from it then you know you can a little and it won't be the end of the world.

If it has a negative effect on how you feel or sleep, or any other aspect of your health then you know you should just avoid it altogether.

For example I know I can drink 1 beer or have 1 slice of bread and feel fine, if I have more than that I get stomach pain. Although I don't eat bread, or drink anymore.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on January 23, 2011
at 02:33 PM

Thanks, I have not had any legume or legume based food in 6 months

0
Ebb3e5f3d3d424f756d71028dc57dcd4

on May 09, 2012
at 05:00 AM

From: http://lib.ugent.be/fulltxt/RUG01/001/460/607/RUG01-001460607_2011_0001_AC.pdf

"Soaking enhances the removal of the seed coat to reduce the cooking time. The level of soyasaponins and the composition of the legumes were not influenced by the soaking process."

"Cooking makes legumes edible, contributes to the aroma development and increases the digestibility. However leaching of both soyasaponins into the cooking solution was observed,especially in the case of lentils."

May I recommend steaming your lentils in the pressure cooker? I have found that you can steam legumes using approximately twice the pressure cooking time they would usually need boiling. Here is my technique:

http://www.hippressurecooking.com/2011/07/american-three-bean-salad-pressure.html

This should preserve all the water-soluble vitamins and nutrients.

Ciao,

L

0
Ebb3e5f3d3d424f756d71028dc57dcd4

on May 09, 2012
at 04:31 AM

Foaming and lentils should not be an issue in the pressure cooker if you follow these basic safety rules (also written in your pressure cooker's instruction manual):

-Never fill a pressure cooker more than half full with liquid and legumes.

-Always add one tablespoon of oil per cup of legumes, or any fat (bacon for example), to reduce the foaming while cooking.

-Never open a legume-containing pressure cooker with "normal" release (through the valve). Instead, use Natrual Release (don't touch anything and let the pressure come down by itself) or cold-water quick (not for electric pressure cookers).

Ciao,

L

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