8

votes

LDL high? Increase your cholesterol intake. The elephant in the room?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 06, 2012 at 8:45 AM

Three months after going paleo, more than two years ago, my cholesterol started rising - particularly the LDL level with triglycerides remaining low and HDL varying but generally being nice and high. I have a cholesterol meter and check my levels weekly and have done so for the past three years. I also have a regular lab test two or three times a year. I'm 130lbs, 15% bf. ApoE 3/3

Over the past year I've varied the various ratios of fats in my diet to try and reduce the LDL all to no avail. I've increased protein intake from 15% of my diet to 25% which has reduced the fat percentage but again with almost no change in LDL levels.

A couple of days ago I happened to notice one lab test reading from fifteen months ago where the LDL level was 177 (4.6) whereas the two readings either side were 289 (7.4) and 220 (5.7). Since I keep a daily food record I checked to see if there was something particularly significant about my diet the day before the lab test. There was! I'd consumed almost 1 gram of cholesterol the day before the test.

I then checked my diet for each day prior to the cholesterol tests and sure enough, on 6 occasions when I'd eaten more than my average amount of cholesterol (300-400mg), the following day's LDL level was far lower.

To check this theory I've now done the following with my n=1 experiment :

Last Saturday (28 Apr) cholesterol intake : 585mg (from 2 eggs, beef, salmon, butter) LDL next day : 241 (6.26)

Thursday (3 May) cholesterol intake : 1080mg (2.5 eggs, 2oz beef liver, 2 oz beef kidney, cheese) LDL next day : 171 (4.43)

A 30% reduction in LDL - bringing my Total Cholesterol to a fairly "normal" 244 (6.33) for the first time in almost two years.

I'm due lab tests and a full medical in the coming week or two and will see if I get similar results.

If anyone else with elevated LDL is interested in giving this a try then I'd be very interested to hear the results.

Incidentally, I had a full thyroid panel recently as I was hoping to discover this to be the cause of the LDL elevation however all my levels came back fine. Also, Hs-CRP 0.4, ESR 6, Lp(a) 9 .

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:03 AM

Perhaps - however this doesn't appear to be the case in this instance. My o-3/6 ratio has varied only between 1:1.5 and 1:2.1 during the past three years (with the full fatty acid breakdown reported as "ideal"). My TG/HDL ratio is consistently between 0.5 and 0.7. Ultrasound shows some narrowing of both carotids which has apparently worsened during the past two years (whilst on a low carb, high fat diet). I have now reduced my LDL by eating more cholesterol and my inflammatory markers (HS-CRP, HBA1C, ESR) have all reduced significantly - possibly just a coincidence. Thanks for your comments.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 19, 2012
at 10:51 AM

I'm Apo E3/E3 Marc as I noted in my question. My meter give a claculated LDL whereas the lab tests give a measured value - to be honest the two don't vary by much in my case. I live in Europe where we don't seem to have NMR type tests available at present however I've just had my ApoB levels checked with results expected shortly. I'll be interested to see how high the levels are.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 18, 2012
at 11:27 AM

Thanks for your comment Joel. I don't have this genetic disorder as far as the present assessment of known relevant genes is concerned. However there may be genes accounting for this as yet unrecognised.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:53 AM

Without inflammation (o-3/6 ratio), and small dense LDL (triglyceride/HDL ratio) heart disease doesnt happen.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:52 AM

In agree, whats this obsession with meaningless LDL numbers? Its your trigycleride versus HDL ratio, and your omega 3/6 ratio thats important for heart disease, if that was the concern.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 13, 2012
at 08:48 AM

:) I read that in the Ferris book just last night! For people who already eat plenty of eggs I wonder if their LDL levels would be even higher if they didn't. After a month of av.750mg/day dietary chol. my numbers remain far better than they were - LDL now 155-160 rather than 240-255 (dietary cholesterol was 375mg/day at this time). A reduction iro of 40% in LDL. As a side note - coconut oil seem to worsen both my LDL and HDL numbers - both when consumed as an oil and when I eat coconut meat. CardiocheckPA often comes up at good prices on ebay ;-)

0bd088ef7de71c805869e80d77824f37

(0)

on June 06, 2012
at 03:53 PM

I saw the video...thx. Thanks for sharing the data on the CardioCheckPA (will consider, but kinda expensive)... very consistent weekly readings which are in line with what I have read about standard deviation of normal daily fluctuations. I normally about a dozen eggs per week perhaps I need to double or triple my intake! FYI- Tim Ferris suggests multiple egg yolks before bed... to help boost testosterone production... for when you planning a little extra fun with the opposite sex. Another good reason for eggs :)

0bd088ef7de71c805869e80d77824f37

(0)

on June 06, 2012
at 03:40 PM

very interesting; your weekly cholesterol numbers are very consistent... so thats a good datapoint for me. perhaps i should check on the CardiocheckPA (expensive, though) system... and increase my egg yolk consumption! FYI- Tim Ferris suggests multiple egg yolks before bed... before peak cholesterol producing hours, to help boost testosterone production... when you plan to have a little extra fun with the opposite sex :)

9e20abb05f3f6e3cc4bb107f8980aecd

(5939)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:31 PM

Hi Dave - I don't know how to test for choline and methionine status but you can experiment. If liver and eggs reduce your LDL but butter does not, then it's choline and methionine, not cholesterol.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:18 PM

Today's (31May12) readings after 420mg dietary cholesterol during previous 24-hours: TC:275 (7.15), HDL:91 (2.37),TG:49 (0.56),LDL:174 (4.52).

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:13 PM

I was vegetarian for almost 20 years and had levels similar to those I have now. I now eat far more cholesterol in my diet each day.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:10 PM

Because I reduced the SFA and changed the balance of fats several times during the past year with almost no variation in the levels. Only when I add more cholesterol in the diet does LDL decrease.

22fd82abf435768244f8d074430cd1e6

(590)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:52 AM

I don't think I understand: why do you say that it is the increased cholesterol consumption and not the reduction in saturated fat that reduced your cholesterol?

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 30, 2012
at 05:30 PM

Sure - unfortunately in the UK RT3 seems to be available only in London at present with a 61 day delay for the results! So minus the RT3 my most recent results were (ranges in brackets): TSH: 1.41 (1.0-2.0), FT4: 15.6 (12-22), FT3: 5.4 (3.1-6.9), TotalT4: 85 (59-154), Thyroglobulin antibody: 12.3 (0-115), Thyroid Peroxide Antibodies: <5 (<34).

0bd088ef7de71c805869e80d77824f37

(0)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:52 PM

can you share your thyroid panels? i'm trying to decode my own rise in ldl and when my panels came back, they were all within "reference range". TSH 2.09, FT4 1.27, FT3 2.9, RT3 20. But when I calculated the FT3/RT3 ratio, it was 14.5, below the recommended 20 figure that I found on a few blogs. But I cannot corroborate these ratios and there seems to be no reference range.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:49 PM

Thanks for your input Paul. Before this recent discovery my usual choline intake was 200-400mg/day - topped up by 200mg (A-GPC) in LEF's Congitex, methionine was 1.5gm/day. Since the above results my intake of choline is all dietary iro 650mg/day and methionine iro 2.4g due to increased protein intake. By "marker" is the implication "deficiency"? Any levels I could get tested? Thanks!

9e20abb05f3f6e3cc4bb107f8980aecd

(5939)

on May 30, 2012
at 02:26 PM

Maybe the cholesterol is a marker for choline and methionine.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on May 26, 2012
at 09:13 AM

I've always had perfect electrolyte balance yet I benefit from calcium, magnesium and sodium in the form of eggshell calcium, epsom salt baths and salt.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 26, 2012
at 08:18 AM

Thanks for your suggestion but I have an annual check on all the major micronutrients and a full breakdown of fats - all have been within range for the past three years. Micronutrient ratios also all within range.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on May 25, 2012
at 08:33 PM

You say you have lower cholesterol with increased cholesterol intake, but you're getting that cholesterol from eggs and liver. Those foods are pretty nutrient-dense compared to any paleo food low in cholesterol. So I think there might be some micro-nutrients playing a role here (copper could be one of them but not in your case, apparently).

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 25, 2012
at 07:00 PM

I think you misunderstand - that's not my diet - just the major sources of cholesterol within the diet. My copper levels were high end of normal a month ago.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:38 PM

nice pull from Know Your Fats. +1

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:25 PM

Because numbers interest me

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 07, 2012
at 11:18 AM

Maybe you're right - for those of us with elevated LDL's - 4-6 egg yolks and some offal each day ala Dr. Jan Kwasniewski's "Optimal Diet"

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 06, 2012
at 06:21 PM

Thanks for the advice - ESR has varied between 2 and 6 this past year, CRP between 0.3 and 0.5, Lp(a) between 5 and 9. Of course I plan on repeating this and will have a lab test shortly - I hope someone else will have similar results hence the purpose of this post. A possible explanation for the results would be nice too.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 06, 2012
at 06:02 PM

It's possible you could be right and these lipid tests may indeed vary inversely with dietary intake of cholesterol immediately prior to the blood draw. However, I don't think so, unless you can replicate the results the next half a dozen times. Btw, your ESR is a tad high for a 130 pound male with 15% body fat doing Paleo. For someone eating really clean, your CRP should be <0.3 and ESR<2, and your LPa is slightly high normal but that's thought to be genetical. I'd focus on getting your ESR down as much as trying to divine a link between serum and dietary cholesterol.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 06, 2012
at 04:02 PM

It'll be nice if a few others have a go and see a similar result. Even a regular home test kit should show such a large reduction. Fingers crossed for some few eureka moments!

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on May 06, 2012
at 03:55 PM

This is a pretty amazing N=1 considering most people do not track their food for that long and/or have the gadgets needed to track their cholesterol reaction.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 06, 2012
at 02:44 PM

Sure, a 10-12 hour fast every time. I'd agree with you aside from the fact that when I reviewed two years worth of tests (both my own meter and lab tests) the six occasions when LDL dropped noticeable was following a day when I'd had a higher cholesterol intake. TG/HDL is usually around 0.75. My HDL and LDL (and TG) vary throughout the day.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5147)

on May 06, 2012
at 02:19 PM

Any correlation is probably coincidental. The only number that needs fasting is TG. Your HDL and LDL #s will correlate with your diet over a longer period, say 2-3 months. Are you not taking these tests while fasting 10-12 hours?

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 06, 2012
at 01:54 PM

Yes, the Cardiochek PA - used it for the past three or four years and it's generally been very reliable when compared to lab values.

531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on May 06, 2012
at 01:11 PM

If you take your cholesterol weekly, I'm assuming your using a CardioCheck machine?

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 06, 2012
at 11:38 AM

Me too - maybe I have a dodgy LDL receptor in my liver. Genetically 23andme says I have genes which are likely to give slightly higher LDL and also slightly higher HDL.

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:53 AM

I would be interested to know if there is any reason/science behind this.

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13 Answers

best answer

8
D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 25, 2012
at 03:52 PM

After much searching I believe I've found the reason/science behind my results - I've now had 5 similar results with LDL being consistently 30% or greater below my levels over the past two years.

The following explanation comes from P186-187 of Mary Enig's "Know Your Fats" :

"What about dietary cholesterol? Feeding dietary cholesterol raises serum cholesterol in healthy normal people whose cholesterol levels are low and lowers serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolemics whose cholesterol levels are high. . In some individuals whose serum cholesterol levels are high, there is some overproduction that is turned off when dietary cholesterol is consumed: this results in the same levels of serum cholesterol or sometimes a reduction of serum cholesterol."

Seems that my liver was consistently producing far too much cholesterol, possibly due to increased saturate fat intake (including coconut oil). I've reduced the saturated fat, increased monounsaturated fat and added a few eggs or liver each day.

I'm grateful, after almost two years of elevated lipids, to have found a dietary solution to the problem. LDL reduced from 260 (6.7) to 170 (4.4).

9e20abb05f3f6e3cc4bb107f8980aecd

(5939)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:31 PM

Hi Dave - I don't know how to test for choline and methionine status but you can experiment. If liver and eggs reduce your LDL but butter does not, then it's choline and methionine, not cholesterol.

9e20abb05f3f6e3cc4bb107f8980aecd

(5939)

on May 30, 2012
at 02:26 PM

Maybe the cholesterol is a marker for choline and methionine.

22fd82abf435768244f8d074430cd1e6

(590)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:52 AM

I don't think I understand: why do you say that it is the increased cholesterol consumption and not the reduction in saturated fat that reduced your cholesterol?

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on May 25, 2012
at 04:38 PM

nice pull from Know Your Fats. +1

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:49 PM

Thanks for your input Paul. Before this recent discovery my usual choline intake was 200-400mg/day - topped up by 200mg (A-GPC) in LEF's Congitex, methionine was 1.5gm/day. Since the above results my intake of choline is all dietary iro 650mg/day and methionine iro 2.4g due to increased protein intake. By "marker" is the implication "deficiency"? Any levels I could get tested? Thanks!

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:10 PM

Because I reduced the SFA and changed the balance of fats several times during the past year with almost no variation in the levels. Only when I add more cholesterol in the diet does LDL decrease.

6
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on May 07, 2012
at 12:40 PM

If you don't have familial hypercholesterolemia, and you're eating a healthy balanced diet of natural whole foods, why are you so fixated on lab values that don't really say anything about your state of health?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:53 AM

Without inflammation (o-3/6 ratio), and small dense LDL (triglyceride/HDL ratio) heart disease doesnt happen.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:25 PM

Because numbers interest me

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:52 AM

In agree, whats this obsession with meaningless LDL numbers? Its your trigycleride versus HDL ratio, and your omega 3/6 ratio thats important for heart disease, if that was the concern.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 19, 2012
at 11:03 AM

Perhaps - however this doesn't appear to be the case in this instance. My o-3/6 ratio has varied only between 1:1.5 and 1:2.1 during the past three years (with the full fatty acid breakdown reported as "ideal"). My TG/HDL ratio is consistently between 0.5 and 0.7. Ultrasound shows some narrowing of both carotids which has apparently worsened during the past two years (whilst on a low carb, high fat diet). I have now reduced my LDL by eating more cholesterol and my inflammatory markers (HS-CRP, HBA1C, ESR) have all reduced significantly - possibly just a coincidence. Thanks for your comments.

1
1bc801d07ecbb899e0d26d350785cf5f

on July 03, 2013
at 07:33 PM

Dave, was wondering if your LDL has remained low in conjunction with increased dietary cholesterol intake. Thanks!

1
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on May 25, 2012
at 05:49 PM

You kinda compared a diet of muscle meat with a diet with organs. Put that into cron-o-meter, and I think you'll agree it's not just the cholesterol. You might have some issues with copper, addressed by eating liver.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on May 26, 2012
at 09:13 AM

I've always had perfect electrolyte balance yet I benefit from calcium, magnesium and sodium in the form of eggshell calcium, epsom salt baths and salt.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on May 25, 2012
at 08:33 PM

You say you have lower cholesterol with increased cholesterol intake, but you're getting that cholesterol from eggs and liver. Those foods are pretty nutrient-dense compared to any paleo food low in cholesterol. So I think there might be some micro-nutrients playing a role here (copper could be one of them but not in your case, apparently).

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 25, 2012
at 07:00 PM

I think you misunderstand - that's not my diet - just the major sources of cholesterol within the diet. My copper levels were high end of normal a month ago.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 26, 2012
at 08:18 AM

Thanks for your suggestion but I have an annual check on all the major micronutrients and a full breakdown of fats - all have been within range for the past three years. Micronutrient ratios also all within range.

0
33e024bdafdbab4a5bd4ceccc484e72f

(0)

on June 13, 2013
at 07:26 PM

Really interested as I am in a similar situation. Are you still getting the same results with increased cholesterol intake? Would love to hear any updates. Thanks

0
C7023fb2a4aaad9af27da49332c41ac1

on June 05, 2013
at 04:27 AM

Cholesterol meter? What's that? Can I get it in Canada? I just had my blood result and my LDL jumped from 3.7 to 5 and my HDL rose, too . My doctor is alarmed saying that I have the cholesterol of a 70-year old! I just had a skin cholesterol done 2 months ago and it was excellent at just below 5.

So I'd like to test it for myself at various times. How does this meter work?

0
1e4d18ff3daaf7e6d5adffd5d4061089

on January 20, 2013
at 01:17 AM

Anybody have experience with high LP-PLA2 test results (as it relates to inflammation)? My recent Lp-PLA2 was 242, with HDL 65 and LDL 154/ total cholesterol of 242, triglycerides 105

0
9f9cb3c7e66d1b4553afd956d5cd4397

(147)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:02 PM

I am surprised that diet can change LDL in only 1-2 days. See this link below for some info on this point: http://blog.trackyourplaque.com/2011/11/friday-is-my-bad-day.html

Are you measuring real LDL or using Friedewald formula for calculating it from TC, HDL etc? The best way to measure LDL is LDL particle number. Have you ever tried it? (NMR Lipoprofile) Also, do you now your ApoE Phenotype e.g. E3/E3 or E3/E4? 23andme checks it, so you can find it in your 23andme file.

Also check the links below. You may find them related to your question.

http://blog.trackyourplaque.com/2010/04/carbohydrates-and-ldl.html http://blog.trackyourplaque.com/2009/12/small-ldl-perfect-index-of-carbohydrate-intake.html http://blog.trackyourplaque.com/2011/10/unforgiving-small-ldl-particles.html

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 19, 2012
at 10:51 AM

I'm Apo E3/E3 Marc as I noted in my question. My meter give a claculated LDL whereas the lab tests give a measured value - to be honest the two don't vary by much in my case. I live in Europe where we don't seem to have NMR type tests available at present however I've just had my ApoB levels checked with results expected shortly. I'll be interested to see how high the levels are.

0
06c1ddf4e1794e379c4410219d30aeb1

on June 18, 2012
at 05:45 AM

Dave, it seems you have some fairly uncommon genetic disorder called Familial Hypercholesterolemia, For the sake of your health I would advise seeing a doctor, rather than just doing home experiments which may help for the short run, but may cause a multitude of problems in the long term.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 18, 2012
at 11:27 AM

Thanks for your comment Joel. I don't have this genetic disorder as far as the present assessment of known relevant genes is concerned. However there may be genes accounting for this as yet unrecognised.

0
D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 30, 2012
at 06:00 PM

@ed Thanks for the links - I wasn't aware of either of them. Did you watch the video I linked to above - I found it interesting even if it's only n=1. I think my problem will turn out to be a genetic one. However since only a relatively small numer of genes have yet been identified which indicate the likelihood of FH it will probably be a while before I find out. I tested with 23andme and, with the current information, am likely to have "slightly" higher than "normal" LDL and HDL.

Prior to me discovering the changes brought on by increasing cholesterol my LDL readings were taken weekly :LDL 247,239,227,216,247,237,251,241 (8 weeks prior). Since increasing my dietary cholesterol intake LDL:171,174,170,184,163 (most recent).

The CardiochekPA is often used in drugstores and for testing by GP's in their practices. In the UK is is recommended by the NHS. I've found that it ties in fairly accurately with lab test results even at the extremes of the ranges i.e. TC:400. My results were from test strips in two different batches.

I've eaten only 400mg of cholesterol today - I'll run a test in the morning and post the results tomorrow to see how they compare with today's.

Thanks for you input - it's much appreciated!

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on June 13, 2012
at 08:48 AM

:) I read that in the Ferris book just last night! For people who already eat plenty of eggs I wonder if their LDL levels would be even higher if they didn't. After a month of av.750mg/day dietary chol. my numbers remain far better than they were - LDL now 155-160 rather than 240-255 (dietary cholesterol was 375mg/day at this time). A reduction iro of 40% in LDL. As a side note - coconut oil seem to worsen both my LDL and HDL numbers - both when consumed as an oil and when I eat coconut meat. CardiocheckPA often comes up at good prices on ebay ;-)

0bd088ef7de71c805869e80d77824f37

(0)

on June 06, 2012
at 03:53 PM

I saw the video...thx. Thanks for sharing the data on the CardioCheckPA (will consider, but kinda expensive)... very consistent weekly readings which are in line with what I have read about standard deviation of normal daily fluctuations. I normally about a dozen eggs per week perhaps I need to double or triple my intake! FYI- Tim Ferris suggests multiple egg yolks before bed... to help boost testosterone production... for when you planning a little extra fun with the opposite sex. Another good reason for eggs :)

0bd088ef7de71c805869e80d77824f37

(0)

on June 06, 2012
at 03:40 PM

very interesting; your weekly cholesterol numbers are very consistent... so thats a good datapoint for me. perhaps i should check on the CardiocheckPA (expensive, though) system... and increase my egg yolk consumption! FYI- Tim Ferris suggests multiple egg yolks before bed... before peak cholesterol producing hours, to help boost testosterone production... when you plan to have a little extra fun with the opposite sex :)

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:18 PM

Today's (31May12) readings after 420mg dietary cholesterol during previous 24-hours: TC:275 (7.15), HDL:91 (2.37),TG:49 (0.56),LDL:174 (4.52).

0
0bd088ef7de71c805869e80d77824f37

on May 30, 2012
at 04:47 PM

I didn't realize how sensitive the cholesterol tests were to daily fluctuations in food intake.

Have you been following the cholesterol series on Attia's site? Enig's explanation doesnt sit too well with my current understanding of cholesterol synthesis, absorption and trafficking in serum. Are there any references for Enig's statement? I'm interested, because I've been doing quite a bit of reading on the subject lately.

My current understanding based in part on reading background materials provided on Attia's blog (lecturepad.org is a good resource). Increasing dietary cholesterol intake typically has very modest impact on serum cholesterol. The primary reason is that only a small fraction of dietary cholesterol can be absorbed in the gut because it needs to be free cholesterol and the vast majority of cholesterol in food is esterified; and even then, this dietary cholesterol competes with endogenous pools of cholesterol that are put into the gut via bile acids during digestion. But assuming that you are a hyperabsorber (there is significant population variation), this would in fact increase the sterol content of the liver.

So if you absorbed more dietary cholesterol, your liver might not need to produce as much. But since the half life of LDL particle is approx 3 days; it seems like it would take longer than overnight to have serum LDL-C concentrations be impacted by a dietary change.

But since you are a frequent tester, perhaps you know a lot better. I'm curious... how much weekly variation are you seeing in your LDL (289, 177, 220?) and is this something related to real measurements or the testing kit that you use?

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:40 AM

It seems like following a consistent diet would be a better test...

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 07, 2012
at 11:18 AM

Maybe you're right - for those of us with elevated LDL's - 4-6 egg yolks and some offal each day ala Dr. Jan Kwasniewski's "Optimal Diet"

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5b14c3d342569091f04586e364c1b2c8

on May 31, 2012
at 06:51 AM

Eat less meat. Meat is only source of dietary cholesterol. You are risking heart disease. I suggest your read "engine 2 diet" . By rip esseystyn. The meat is giving you high cholesterol. Im not a vegan but I reduced cholesterol by eating less meat and more plants. A lean chicken breast has same amount cholesterol as steak.

D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:13 PM

I was vegetarian for almost 20 years and had levels similar to those I have now. I now eat far more cholesterol in my diet each day.

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