1

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Lab work Post Paleo - increased LDL

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 27, 2012 at 2:50 PM

Hello,

I recently had a full blood panel after 4 months on the paleo diet. I'd love to get feedback from the community on my numbers. My total Cholesterol went from 184 to 214, so I'm alittle concerned. Here are the details:

Total Cholesterol: Pre 184, Post 214

HDL: Pre 67, Post 70

LDL: Pre 103, Post 133

Triglycerides: Pre 70, Post 54

Glucose: Pre 77, Post 77

I'd love to get feedback on these numbers.

Thanks!

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on March 27, 2012
at 09:24 PM

The problem is that lab measurements can vary enormously on LDL particle size, which is not very accurate. http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2012/03/live-blogging-from-paleo-summit-ix.html

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on March 27, 2012
at 09:08 PM

Also there is some unreliability of LDL particle size measurement http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2012/03/live-blogging-from-paleo-summit-ix.html

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on March 27, 2012
at 09:06 PM

Check this: http://chriskresser.com/5-reasons-not-to-worry-about-your-cholesterol-numbers

B4661e44912c6f7c5eb26f36d15dd604

(120)

on March 27, 2012
at 05:27 PM

Any links for the Pattern-A/Pattern-B stuff I'd love to read some papers on that?

B4661e44912c6f7c5eb26f36d15dd604

(120)

on March 27, 2012
at 05:26 PM

Any links for the Pattern-A/Pattern-B stuff I'd love to read some papers on that.

B4661e44912c6f7c5eb26f36d15dd604

(120)

on March 27, 2012
at 05:25 PM

That study while interesting is next to useless. That's because it is retroactive. They could have gotten exactly the same results that they did even if LDL and HDL had no effect whatsoever on CAD risk because the distribution of those factors in the general population will have a huge impact on the results of a retroactive study. So maybe High HDL and LDL reduce you risk CAD or maybe people with both high are just really rare, for that study it's impossible to tell. also it's Table 2 for those who want to look and not search the paper for it.

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on March 27, 2012
at 04:22 PM

Do you really want to get medical advice from strangers on a website?

10d053b5901babaaaef5d8b5cd34ca55

(5)

on March 27, 2012
at 03:20 PM

That's great info. Thank you! I'm thinking about finding a paleo friendly Naturopathic doctor. I feel like I will never get the right support from my current doc.

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3 Answers

2
11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on March 27, 2012
at 03:13 PM

It's the pattern type of the LDL that matters most.

Pattern-A (large, fluffy) LDL is not associated with an increase in heart disease.

Pattern-B (small, dense) LDL is associated with an increase in heart disease.

You need to find out from your doctor the breakdown of your LDL, not just the total number.

Having a high LDL level that is mostly pattern-A (big LDL) is good, imho. People with high LDL levels (that are pattern-A) actually live longer, have lower cancer risks, have fewer infectious diseases (LDL is also part of your immune system), and are NOT at higher risk of a heart attack.

Take a look at this study by UCLA:

http://www.ahjonline.com/article/S0002-8703(08)00717-5/fulltext

They got hold of the medical records of 59% of all heart attack patients between 2000 and 2006 and analyzed them for cholesterol levels. It's laid out in a pretty easy to read table. One of the interesting facts is that people that had both high HDL (over 60) and high LDL (over 160) only had 0.7% of heart attacks. Note, that wasn't 7% that was 0.7%, as in less than 1%, as in only 7 of every 1,000.

The other thing you need to get from your doctor is the Lp(a) number. LP(a) is a type of LDL with a protein molecule attached. High levels of Lp(a) have been associated with heat disease. The reason most doctors don't focus on it is (1) the levels are primarily due to heredity, and (2) there is no magic pill to lower (although niacin is supposed to have some effect), so big pharma doesn't push lowering it.

Lp(a) is not the same as LDL pattern-A, but a lot of people get them confused.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on March 27, 2012
at 09:24 PM

The problem is that lab measurements can vary enormously on LDL particle size, which is not very accurate. http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2012/03/live-blogging-from-paleo-summit-ix.html

10d053b5901babaaaef5d8b5cd34ca55

(5)

on March 27, 2012
at 03:20 PM

That's great info. Thank you! I'm thinking about finding a paleo friendly Naturopathic doctor. I feel like I will never get the right support from my current doc.

B4661e44912c6f7c5eb26f36d15dd604

(120)

on March 27, 2012
at 05:27 PM

Any links for the Pattern-A/Pattern-B stuff I'd love to read some papers on that?

B4661e44912c6f7c5eb26f36d15dd604

(120)

on March 27, 2012
at 05:25 PM

That study while interesting is next to useless. That's because it is retroactive. They could have gotten exactly the same results that they did even if LDL and HDL had no effect whatsoever on CAD risk because the distribution of those factors in the general population will have a huge impact on the results of a retroactive study. So maybe High HDL and LDL reduce you risk CAD or maybe people with both high are just really rare, for that study it's impossible to tell. also it's Table 2 for those who want to look and not search the paper for it.

B4661e44912c6f7c5eb26f36d15dd604

(120)

on March 27, 2012
at 05:26 PM

Any links for the Pattern-A/Pattern-B stuff I'd love to read some papers on that.

1
0ead271762198cb1344fdc104b42bbbd

on March 27, 2012
at 10:10 PM

First, our knowledge of what lipid panel numbers mean is typically in the context of the prevailing diet, not on a paleo-type diet.

Second, our knowledge of what lipid panel numbers is from epidemiological studies, and therefore is actually composed of guesswork (hopefully decent guesswork, though).

With those caveats thrown out, your numbers are fairly well in line with what we see in healthy populations. Total cholesterol between 200 and 240 is associated with the lowest rates of mortality and disease, and your HDL:LDL ratio is very good ("good" is over .3, "ideal" is over .4, yours is over .5).

1
B9ce64f05e113a053e25826a816e256d

(10)

on March 27, 2012
at 04:21 PM

HDL and Triglycerides are moving in the right direction. Chris Masterjohn said that anytime you get your blood tested for Cholesterol the numbers can fluctuate by as many as 40 basis points. The other thing he said was that when you change your diet from SAD to a healthier alternative that your liver can throw off LDL for months (up to a year). The LDL has built up in your liver over years and takes time to release. Be patient and get tested quarterly until you have passed the one year mark. Keep up the good work and continue to eat what will naturally detox your body!

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