1

votes

Is this True???

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 24, 2012 at 1:41 PM

hi,

i was doing some reading and came across this website. very informative if i must say.

http://eugenia.queru.com/2012/08/23/why-the-mediterraneancretan-diet-was-the-best/

i was wondering if the comment about mono-saccharides not being fed to the bacteria being true as i thought fruit sugars fed bacteria?

could someone explain further please?

thanks again

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 26, 2012
at 08:15 AM

still have edema and other issues i wasnt aware of until i compared myself with photographs of when i was at the university

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 26, 2012
at 08:14 AM

no, they started on a protein diet with whey, and were exacerbated by a vegan diet. on sad i didnt have these issues, but they didnt disappear when i went sad again. so i went low-carb, which helped a bit, but after a while it stopped working. now im high carb(ray peat style) and doing better than in the past 2 years.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:07 AM

Korion - did your sibo and low thyroid symptoms start with low carb?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:06 AM

Ah, so if going low carb slowed down your thyroid hormone (which it hasnt for me, I just recently started getting hyper symptoms from too much iodine free t4 was couple points above range, tsh, below range), then increasing carbs would help. Also presumably if your sibo issues werent years old and you used to eat primarily just carbs (like me). Interesting to note though, ill remember that then.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 25, 2012
at 07:59 PM

Anecdotally, thyroid hormone really improves my digestion and food tolerance. Progesterone too. But I prefer using food.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 25, 2012
at 07:27 PM

To respond to Jamie's question about thyroid and overgrowth: part of that is that there is some evidence that thyroid hormone may up-regulate expression of transporter proteins like GLUT5 and SGLT1 in the gut, allowing glucose and fructose to be absorbed more effectively, which helps prevent such carbs from being fed to bad bacteria.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 25, 2012
at 04:59 PM

i think my immune system was doing pretty bad, which seemed to be related to hypoglycemia, which seemed related to thyroid issues. eating more sugar, salt and drinking orange juice solved this, and it also 'milk allergy' (inadequate lactase production?)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 02:03 PM

My thyroid is overactive, just as an aside. How would pure sugar help bacteria overgrowth? (And what does the thyroid have to do with overgrowth?). I cant make any sense at all of what your saying, but I am curious. How do you think sugar removed your bacteria?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:36 PM

i had bacterial overgrowth, had severe acne, tinea, and eating more pure sugar helped. going zero-carb worsened my tinea like crazy and gave me big time acne on legs. i think its more important to support the thyroid etcetera.

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(496)

on August 25, 2012
at 07:40 AM

sorry it relates to point 3. No sugar

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:37 AM

Thats not to say there arent some varieties that eat fats, but it must at least be less common, because most people talk about bacteria foremost eating carbs, and secondmost converting aminos into glucose from protein.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:32 AM

But yeah, its not really in question that your macronutrients influence your gut bacteria. And ask any person with bacterial overgrowth what foods they need to avoid. The answer will be carbs (either simple or complex, or both). Carbs are easy food for various bacteria. Just put some sugar in a glass of water and leave it overnight to see that. Although they can also get some food from protein, its not as common, or easy for them. I am not aware of any gut bacteria that can eat fat.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:26 AM

As for metabolism, I was speaking of insulin mainly, and also the stress of glycation and all that. That depends partly on your level of exercise and its a contraversial area. Again, I said _might_

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:25 AM

I did say might. Macronutrients influence you biome. What effect that has on health is unknown, but our anscestral diet would not have been frequently in very high in carbohyrdates, given most modern hunter gatherers do not eat a majority carbs. http://www.dovepress.com/comparison-with-ancestral-diets-suggests-dense-acellular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/09/your-gut-bacteria-are-what-you-e.html

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:24 AM

I did say _might_. http://www.dovepress.com/comparison-with-ancestral-diets-suggests-dense-acellular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO . http://www.dovepress.com/comparison-with-ancestral-diets-suggests-dense-acellular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO . Macronutrients influence you biome. What effect that has on health is unknown, but our anscestral diet would not have been frequently in very high in carbohyrdates, given most modern hunter gatherers do not eat a majority carbs.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 24, 2012
at 10:42 PM

Could you state your question specifically? Otherwise I have to read the entire article you linked to in order to try to discover what your question refers to. I just think it will help you get more responses if you make the question explicit.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:24 PM

*"Gut bacteria, might be one reason not to have a very high carb intake in general(along with metabolism)"* say whut? How is high carb problematic for gut bacteria, let alone metabolism?

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2 Answers

2
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 24, 2012
at 04:20 PM

The Med diet also included many days of fasting/ food restriction

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15333159

A paleo diets seem to outperform them..

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17583796

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/pdf/1743-7075-7-85.pdf

And a Med diet doesn't necessarily even lower inflammation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306923

2
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 24, 2012
at 02:11 PM

Bacteria can eat basically any carb. The only carbs that are quickly digested are small amounts of fructose (under a certain low threshold), and any amount of glucose. Eating alot of fruit (which also have sucrose and galactose), will be as problematic for gut bacteria as using alot of sugar, if your concerned about the impact on gut flora (perhaps moreso if the fruit has galactose).

As you might imagine that will depend on the fruit, and the quantity consumed. There is large variation in the sugars in fruits. For example, cranberry is mostly glucose, and pineapple is mostly sucrose, whereas the majority of fruits, on average have some amount of glucose and fructose, and also sometime some sucrose. It varies from fruit to fruit.

But then again, it terms of your gut bacteria, alot of acellular carbs (ie grains), or in fact lots of starch, in general, is very similar in that respect.

Starch is just a bunch of glucose stuch together, and it takes your digestion along time to get it all unstuck. If you have gut bacterial issues (like I do), your tolerance to most carbs (simple or complex) can be quite bad. Not so in healthy people though.

Macronutrients do effect gut flora, in healthy people, but we dont know what ratio is optimal, and we dont know much about gut bacteria either.

Its probably not mostly carbs though, given thats hard to do with fruits, tubers and roots in most enviroments (IMO). Its certainly not lots of refined sucrose (due to the high fructose u get exposed too).

Gut bacteria, might be one reason not to have a very high carb intake in general(along with metabolism). Its a possibly good rationale for avoiding grains altogether and using tubers and roots instead, due to the fact our gut biome is not evolved to be used to acellular carbs, and acellular carbs probably influence gut bacteria more than cellular ones.

But its not really something specific to sucrose. Sucrose has its own issues as well though, as I mentioned above.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:24 AM

I did say _might_. http://www.dovepress.com/comparison-with-ancestral-diets-suggests-dense-acellular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO . http://www.dovepress.com/comparison-with-ancestral-diets-suggests-dense-acellular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO . Macronutrients influence you biome. What effect that has on health is unknown, but our anscestral diet would not have been frequently in very high in carbohyrdates, given most modern hunter gatherers do not eat a majority carbs.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:26 AM

As for metabolism, I was speaking of insulin mainly, and also the stress of glycation and all that. That depends partly on your level of exercise and its a contraversial area. Again, I said _might_

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:32 AM

But yeah, its not really in question that your macronutrients influence your gut bacteria. And ask any person with bacterial overgrowth what foods they need to avoid. The answer will be carbs (either simple or complex, or both). Carbs are easy food for various bacteria. Just put some sugar in a glass of water and leave it overnight to see that. Although they can also get some food from protein, its not as common, or easy for them. I am not aware of any gut bacteria that can eat fat.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:24 PM

*"Gut bacteria, might be one reason not to have a very high carb intake in general(along with metabolism)"* say whut? How is high carb problematic for gut bacteria, let alone metabolism?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:06 AM

Ah, so if going low carb slowed down your thyroid hormone (which it hasnt for me, I just recently started getting hyper symptoms from too much iodine free t4 was couple points above range, tsh, below range), then increasing carbs would help. Also presumably if your sibo issues werent years old and you used to eat primarily just carbs (like me). Interesting to note though, ill remember that then.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 02:03 PM

My thyroid is overactive, just as an aside. How would pure sugar help bacteria overgrowth? (And what does the thyroid have to do with overgrowth?). I cant make any sense at all of what your saying, but I am curious. How do you think sugar removed your bacteria?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 25, 2012
at 04:59 PM

i think my immune system was doing pretty bad, which seemed to be related to hypoglycemia, which seemed related to thyroid issues. eating more sugar, salt and drinking orange juice solved this, and it also 'milk allergy' (inadequate lactase production?)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:37 AM

Thats not to say there arent some varieties that eat fats, but it must at least be less common, because most people talk about bacteria foremost eating carbs, and secondmost converting aminos into glucose from protein.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 26, 2012
at 08:15 AM

still have edema and other issues i wasnt aware of until i compared myself with photographs of when i was at the university

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:25 AM

I did say might. Macronutrients influence you biome. What effect that has on health is unknown, but our anscestral diet would not have been frequently in very high in carbohyrdates, given most modern hunter gatherers do not eat a majority carbs. http://www.dovepress.com/comparison-with-ancestral-diets-suggests-dense-acellular-carbohydrates-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/09/your-gut-bacteria-are-what-you-e.html

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 26, 2012
at 08:14 AM

no, they started on a protein diet with whey, and were exacerbated by a vegan diet. on sad i didnt have these issues, but they didnt disappear when i went sad again. so i went low-carb, which helped a bit, but after a while it stopped working. now im high carb(ray peat style) and doing better than in the past 2 years.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:36 PM

i had bacterial overgrowth, had severe acne, tinea, and eating more pure sugar helped. going zero-carb worsened my tinea like crazy and gave me big time acne on legs. i think its more important to support the thyroid etcetera.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 25, 2012
at 07:59 PM

Anecdotally, thyroid hormone really improves my digestion and food tolerance. Progesterone too. But I prefer using food.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 25, 2012
at 07:27 PM

To respond to Jamie's question about thyroid and overgrowth: part of that is that there is some evidence that thyroid hormone may up-regulate expression of transporter proteins like GLUT5 and SGLT1 in the gut, allowing glucose and fructose to be absorbed more effectively, which helps prevent such carbs from being fed to bad bacteria.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 26, 2012
at 02:07 AM

Korion - did your sibo and low thyroid symptoms start with low carb?

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