3

votes

IS there such thing as paleo gravy?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 29, 2012 at 12:43 AM

I want to increase the amount of organ meat I consume and my preference would be to eat liver. However I can't do it without some sort of gravy.... HELP

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 19, 2013
at 03:03 PM

Thanks for the tip. I realise now that it would probly be pretty nice (am correlating with spicy coconut based curry sauces I've made...)

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on February 19, 2013
at 02:58 PM

Try mixing you yolks with whatever liquid before cooking. Then slowly bring to a boil while stirring constantly. This should thicken nicer for you.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 27, 2012
at 02:51 PM

Well its a sweet gravy. The coconut taste is pretty mild, so you are mostly using it as a thickening agent. I would typically pair it with a roasted turkey or ham (almost like a "honey baked". Or with a very spicy dry rub.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:15 PM

What would that go with? :)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:15 PM

Coconut flakes in gravy?!

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on August 03, 2012
at 02:00 PM

This is how I make gravy too. Broth and fat + reduce by half = gravy. Best tasting made in the pan the meat was in.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 03, 2012
at 12:03 PM

Ed, just remove the gravy from the heat, and whisk in the yolks (pre beaten). This can also be done in a blender (which is my preferred way). It's excellent -- but doesn't thicken as much as I would have thought.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:56 PM

Good idea to chop and add to burgers! I never thought of that one :)

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:42 AM

The blood of the nearest mammal.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:29 AM

Oh, man, that made my mouth water...

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:28 AM

Man, that's the biggest thing I miss... A good roux for thickening ALL the things!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:27 AM

Don't forget the bacon! Liver loves bacon.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on May 29, 2012
at 05:39 AM

Here's how I do chicken liver -- sautee onions in a good amount of butter until they're brown. Remove, toss in livers and cook. REmove, deglaze pan with broth, add another chunk of butter and reduce by half or so. Throw everything back in the pan, coat thoroughly and enjoy.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:33 AM

If you're eating mustard, don't forget that it's a fantastic emulsifier and can be used to thicken sauces.

6498694060d879a7960b35913539b75f

(1307)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:18 AM

Thanks for the link. i didn't have that one!

C56771707ff735264edef58cc952986b

(10)

on May 29, 2012
at 01:41 AM

I sweat the onions first with herbs then add a few drops Kitchen Bouquet to onions and butter in my skillet.

  • 43dc6da5605c3f306100b41bbfffabc4

    asked by

    (420)
  • Views
    13.4K
  • Last Activity
    1258D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

18 Answers

best answer

5
Medium avatar

(19469)

on May 29, 2012
at 12:51 AM

I think it depends on you definition of "paleo", but you can definitely make gluten-free gravy.

Some sort of starch is inevitable because the cooked starch is what gelatinizes and thickens the stock.

This post on glutenfreegirl.com features a pretty simple recipe with instructions... http://glutenfreegirl.com/gluten-free-gravy/

Otherwise, as zoomia said, you could go with a reduction. It won't be a "gravy" per se, but it would provide a flavor-rich sauce that you could add to your liver...http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/blog/sauce-recipes/how-to-make-reduction-sauces/

6498694060d879a7960b35913539b75f

(1307)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:18 AM

Thanks for the link. i didn't have that one!

best answer

7
F6a57a8bb60b5171366f06d9ddbc3880

on May 29, 2012
at 01:28 AM

buttery, fried onions are great with liver :-)

C56771707ff735264edef58cc952986b

(10)

on May 29, 2012
at 01:41 AM

I sweat the onions first with herbs then add a few drops Kitchen Bouquet to onions and butter in my skillet.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:27 AM

Don't forget the bacon! Liver loves bacon.

5
1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on May 29, 2012
at 12:45 AM

Yes, it's called a reduction. :)

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:33 AM

If you're eating mustard, don't forget that it's a fantastic emulsifier and can be used to thicken sauces.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:29 AM

Oh, man, that made my mouth water...

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on May 29, 2012
at 05:39 AM

Here's how I do chicken liver -- sautee onions in a good amount of butter until they're brown. Remove, toss in livers and cook. REmove, deglaze pan with broth, add another chunk of butter and reduce by half or so. Throw everything back in the pan, coat thoroughly and enjoy.

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on August 03, 2012
at 02:00 PM

This is how I make gravy too. Broth and fat + reduce by half = gravy. Best tasting made in the pan the meat was in.

2
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on May 29, 2012
at 04:18 AM

No need for gravy - I eat my liver raw - not as bad as it sounds. My 15 year old son eats it raw now too - he says he barely tastes it that way - but cooked liver is always terrible to him. I also add finely chopped liver to hamburger mix in some bacon and grill patties mmmmm good - never even taste the liver that way.

778b36f4f699f202de135ef176fe9ab7

(1123)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:56 PM

Good idea to chop and add to burgers! I never thought of that one :)

2
Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

on May 29, 2012
at 01:09 AM

Do you ever make roasted chicken? I make a roasted chicken that sits on a bed of chopped veggies (butternut squash, sweet potato, onion, redskins). Rub butter and spices on the chicken and bake at 475 for 1.5 hrs. I think it's actually a Barefoot Contessa recipe...you can find it on foodnetwork if you're interested. Anyway, the sauce that is in the bottom of the pan is absolutely delicious and very flavorful. It's not technically gravy, but it would make organ meat more palatable I would think.

1
A905679417ee71c3f9e2d88964b3b1f0

(368)

on February 19, 2013
at 05:38 AM

You can make a nice thick sauce without any flour. Are you dairy free? If you eat dairy you can make a butter wine sauce reduction similar to a beurre blanc with the reduction. If you are not eating dairy remember that things like egg yolks and mustard are also emulsifiers and can make great pan sauces (gravy).

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 03, 2012
at 12:02 PM

Gravy is just a sauce with fat as the base. So gravy is by definition very Paleo. Many people add flour or corn starch to the fat to get the brown, "velvety" look and feel. If that's your goal, use almond flour or coconut flour. I prefer not to use those. Here's some ideas:

White Gravy: Chicken Fat, Bacon Fat, Fennel Seeds, Sage, Pepper, Coconut Milk

Braise Gravy: Red Wine, Onions, Beef Fat, Beef stock, Bay Leaf, Pepper

Sweet Gravy: Pork/Beef Fat, Cherry Tomatoes, Coconut Flakes, Apple Cider Vinegar, Pepper, Cherries (or blackberries if you want more tart)

Brown Gravy: Beef Fat, Beef Broth, Crimini, Garlic, Onion, Thyme, Orange Juice

Barbecue Style Gravy: Beef Fat, Apple Cider Vinegar, Pickling Spices, Onions, Garlic, Green Peppers, Paprika, Tomato Paste, Cumin

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:15 PM

What would that go with? :)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 19, 2013
at 03:03 PM

Thanks for the tip. I realise now that it would probly be pretty nice (am correlating with spicy coconut based curry sauces I've made...)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:15 PM

Coconut flakes in gravy?!

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 27, 2012
at 02:51 PM

Well its a sweet gravy. The coconut taste is pretty mild, so you are mostly using it as a thickening agent. I would typically pair it with a roasted turkey or ham (almost like a "honey baked". Or with a very spicy dry rub.

1
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 29, 2012
at 11:17 AM

There is a recipe for GAPS gravy which is pretty paleo;

  1. bone broth of any kind, boil in an onion or two or more depending on the amount of sauce making or how much you like oniony taste (I like to roast my onions for better flavor and gravy color-I use 2 max, serves 4)

  2. when onions are cooked and broth is reduced, puree the onions in the broth, salt/pepper.

  3. keep reducing if needed for thickeness.

  4. Often times if the broth is good and jelly it will make an awesome gravy. Left overs are even thicker.

Sometimes I toss in some homemade sour cream/or yogurt and make it a creamy gravy (like a stroughanoff sauce)

bon appetite!

1
0e687980cc3aaa0464ecc64b16add194

on May 29, 2012
at 03:07 AM

I use NomNomPaleo's slow cooker roast chicken & gravy. I've used coconut flour as a thickener (just make sure you sift), but it's pretty thick itself.

http://nomnompaleo.com/post/4807547385/slow-cooker-roast-chicken-and-gravy

0
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on February 19, 2013
at 02:58 PM

I take the liver out of the pan, then add my veggies. After I get them cooked how I want (seasoning, etc) I add a little tomato paste and some water. Makes a pretty great sauce (aka gravy).

I know there are a few reasons to not eat tomato paste... canned food, nightshades... but I think it's a lesser evil situation. Once or twice a week shouldn't be a problem.

Dijon mustard doesn't sound bad, either.

0
516aa41fccd08d5a8625bd26b76f2fec

on February 19, 2013
at 07:28 AM

Take an immersion blender to a combo of fat, broth, and bits (even leave a couple chunks of meat). Presto gravy. Works esp well after taking a roast or chicken out of the crock pot. Thick and tasty, no starch required.

0
Bba234bc552d08cb2b30e3ae7f9b7852

on February 19, 2013
at 04:17 AM

I made gravy using mashed pumpkin instead of flour. Made with about a tablespoon of pan juices and water, the flavour is great. Very Paleo, it thickens up just like using flour.w

0
Medium avatar

(3024)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:32 AM

I've added lots (maybe 1/2 a bottle) of red wine to cooked liver, cooked them together for a bit, removed the liver then reduced the wine to a sauce. Can't remember all the details, but I'm sure you could google liver and "reduced wine" and come up with a proper recipe. Soooo good!

0
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 03, 2012
at 08:34 AM

Just use jus.

After a meat has been cooked, roasted, whatever, throw some water and oil, or stock and a little salt into the pan/dish, heat gently until it reduces a bit, whilst getting all those dense cripsy bits mixed in. Also called a "reduction sauce", but hey, "jus" is fancier sounding...

Delish...

0
Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on May 30, 2012
at 07:54 PM

I think I remember that one of the Paleo books I read talked about an 85%/15% thing. So if you want gravy for your liver, make gluten free gravy and don't worry about if it's Paleo. Sometimes you need to break free and do what works for you. Arrow root, potato starch, there are gluten free choices that you could do.

A friend who raised organic would always give us the liver. I always made it with onions, a half stick of butter, some mushrooms and dumped in a small container of sour cream. We didn't tell the kids what it was. We called it "lovely and onions."

0
36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on May 29, 2012
at 11:21 AM

I've been wanting to try using egg yolk to thicken a sauce. Haven't done it yet. I know you'd need to be careful with the heat to keep it from curdling. Also, cold butter whisked in off-heat is a classic thickener.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 03, 2012
at 12:03 PM

Ed, just remove the gravy from the heat, and whisk in the yolks (pre beaten). This can also be done in a blender (which is my preferred way). It's excellent -- but doesn't thicken as much as I would have thought.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on February 19, 2013
at 02:58 PM

Try mixing you yolks with whatever liquid before cooking. Then slowly bring to a boil while stirring constantly. This should thicken nicer for you.

0
D8c04730b5d016a839b3c5b932bf59dd

on May 29, 2012
at 05:30 AM

I have made a roux for thickening with almond flour. It worked pretty well. I'm looking forward to trying coconut flour. If you've got meat drippings, you can make gravy. My mom and dad loved to argue about ham gravy (mom said it wasn't possible and dad's family was all 'we're eating it, how is it not possible?').

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 29, 2012
at 06:28 AM

Man, that's the biggest thing I miss... A good roux for thickening ALL the things!

0
0423633b41410d279780b51b6fd4bd7e

on May 29, 2012
at 02:49 AM

I've had luck making gravy thickened with bean flour but a lot of folks seem anti legume. So I suggest a butter sauce. After you sear your liver and get it cooked, pour out the cooking fat, add wine/stock/broth/vinegar, flavorings (simple dried herbs, mustard, garlic, onion... Whatever you like) and cook until its almost dry. Turn off the heat and whisk in a quarter cup of cold butter cut into slices. DO NOT REHEAT. Pour directly on liver (or drop the liver into the sauce to reheat!) and serve.

Good fat for good meat for a good lifestyle choice!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!