1

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Is porridge unhealthy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 28, 2011 at 8:39 PM

Ok, so its not Paleo. But go ask people, read articles and they'll give you 1001 and reasons why porridge is healthy. I'm cynical that porridge is a very good food to eat, but I don't think the legume is necessarily to bad and since porridge is merely oats and water, I wanted to hear some other opinions on what people thought about porridge.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 29, 2012
at 09:31 AM

but we don't barf? i'm not really seeing the analogy, but at least you're brainstorming!

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 01, 2011
at 08:18 AM

I believe cats and dogs eat grass when they are already ill, as a kind of medicine and then throw it up, to clean out their gut. Besides you are talking about raw grass, I wouldn't eat raw oats.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 01, 2011
at 08:12 AM

soaking the Oats overnight in lemon juice would get rid of most of the phytic acid. Equally well cooking oats (presumably you cook them regardless), reduces the ammount of phytic acid.

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on February 28, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Sorry...didn't mean to surf on someone's thread....the topic just prompted the question before I had time to think.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:47 PM

sorry, I have corrected that. I put one generation at around 25 years.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:35 PM

How do you arrive at 3750 generations? That's 60,000 years of oat consumption. Perhaps a little here and there, but nothing like a bowl of oatmeal could stretch back that far.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:29 PM

I believe Weston A Price himself studied some people from the Isle of Lewis (Scotland) whose diet was basically oats, fish and nettles, they were in good health.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:25 PM

P.S. I don't think basing a whole meal around only carbohydrate is healthy. So no, porridge not healthy...

Medium avatar

(39821)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:15 PM

That's a good point, but an occasional serving of oats is likely less bad with regard to phytates than the daily servings of nuts that many paleo folks consume.

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6 Answers

2
F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on February 28, 2011
at 08:57 PM

According to the Weston Price folks, oats are very high in phytic acid. To make matters worse, the process of rolling them also heats them, so they're not technically raw anymore by the time you get them, which means no native phytase, which is the enzyme that breaks down phytic acid. So you have to do an acid soak to get the most out of the mineral content.

Mind you, jury's still out about the most effective ways of dealing with phytic acid. Here's this lady's take on phytate (as opposed to phytase) in oatmeal: Oatmeal and Phytic Acid. If you have a special fondness for high-phytate foods in general, you might purchase her white paper to guide you in preparation of these foods.

If you get a lot of other sources of minerals in your diet, especially animal sources like bone broth, oatmeal porridge might not worry you much. Eat it with fat to help blunt your blood sugar response. But if it were me and I had a choice between oats and rice or potato to add a starch to my meal, I'd go with the rice or potato.

Even with the fat added, FWIW, my last period of major weight gain that stuck around for me coincided not only with the birth of my daughter but also with a period in which I worked out how to cook old-fashioned oats in the microwave, so I had oatmeal for breakfast a lot. And I've never had issues with adding fat to it, so I was doing so at that time. I still ballooned out. Of course at that point I generally had a grain-heavy diet, and mostly whole grains at that. Fat lot of good it did me. Literally.

If you can manage to eat a little porridge now and again without fat gain or cravings, go for it... but if you start obsessing about the stuff, I'd leave it alone.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:15 PM

That's a good point, but an occasional serving of oats is likely less bad with regard to phytates than the daily servings of nuts that many paleo folks consume.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:29 PM

I believe Weston A Price himself studied some people from the Isle of Lewis (Scotland) whose diet was basically oats, fish and nettles, they were in good health.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 01, 2011
at 12:52 AM

have you seen cats or dogs eating grass? - they do actually do sometimes, usually vomiting it afterward

i guess the logic of the similar nature could be applied to humans as well: considering that phytic acid's effect is leeching (binding) metals / minerals (and perhaps other nastiness), would not it be reasonable to think that occasional consumption of phytic acid-rich food would have a therapeutic effect?

as a personal anecdote i can say that the same goes for fiber: occasional high consumption (providing protein / fat is as low as possible) and subsequent 'elimination' works great to 'reset' your digestive machinery

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 01, 2011
at 08:18 AM

I believe cats and dogs eat grass when they are already ill, as a kind of medicine and then throw it up, to clean out their gut. Besides you are talking about raw grass, I wouldn't eat raw oats.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 29, 2012
at 09:31 AM

but we don't barf? i'm not really seeing the analogy, but at least you're brainstorming!

1
9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:18 PM

To me there is more logic in eating oats than eating sweet potato, regardless of whimsing over nutrional details; if we are to follow what is a real "Paleo Diet". Being of pure northern european decent I can guarantee that I have no ancestor that ate sweet potato or yams. For that matter very few generations of mine (going backwards) might have eaten rice, maybe 120 generations potato maximum... whereas Oats, well, I could be looking at up to 600 generations, not necessarily time to adapt, but I think it's a valid food choice - no gluten. I am testing to see how I feel about eating it myself. Perhaps best to stick to parsnips and beetroot....

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:25 PM

P.S. I don't think basing a whole meal around only carbohydrate is healthy. So no, porridge not healthy...

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:47 PM

sorry, I have corrected that. I put one generation at around 25 years.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on February 28, 2011
at 09:35 PM

How do you arrive at 3750 generations? That's 60,000 years of oat consumption. Perhaps a little here and there, but nothing like a bowl of oatmeal could stretch back that far.

1
Medium avatar

on February 28, 2011
at 08:48 PM

Dr. Davis is always going on about how high oats spike your blood sugar, but I'm not sure that they're all that bad in the context of a meal. Most people would consume it as its own meal, which could be less than ideal. If you consumed your starch portion in the form of oats alongside a big piece of fatty red meat, I doubt it would be worse than potato or rice by any huge degree (unless your oats are contaminated with gluten or something).

0
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 28, 2011
at 11:45 PM

If you can eat oats without them spiking your blood sugar, then go ahead. But, one should test oneself with a glucose meter upon rising. Normal is around 90-100. Then test 1 hour later...or test every 15 minutes for two hours and see what the graph shows. Dr Davis has said that after eating, ones glucose reading should be close to the fasting glucose level. If the level is more than 15% higher over the time span compared to fasting, then for you, oats are not healthy as your pancreas ability to secret insulin is diminished. Everyone is different.

We know that all carbs are strings of sugar molecules bonded together to look like carbs...that break down into various sugars in the gut. Knowing that, I prefer to not ingest any grains so I will have always have enough beta insulin cells ready to control my blood sugar for the rest of my life.

Diabetes is not in my future.

0
Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on February 28, 2011
at 11:16 PM

Am I to assume that if one were to incorporate the occasional bowl of oats as part of an overall meal, it would be better to soak those oats (ferment) overnight in lemon juice? Has anyone here eaten them that way?

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on February 28, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Sorry...didn't mean to surf on someone's thread....the topic just prompted the question before I had time to think.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 01, 2011
at 08:12 AM

soaking the Oats overnight in lemon juice would get rid of most of the phytic acid. Equally well cooking oats (presumably you cook them regardless), reduces the ammount of phytic acid.

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