0

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Is it true that most men die in their 60s, and most women in their 80s?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 23, 2013 at 8:25 PM

I've been pouring over studies and stats that seem to support this. Over 50% of men wil die by their 70th birthday due to the elevated rates of heart disease and cancer. A few will live into their 70s and 80s, and a very small few into their 90s, which brings the life expectancy up to 70.

Life expectancy does not mean "average of the death", and the latter is where you see the real difference.

The average age for death for a man is probably around 68, while for women its probably around 85.

Once a man hits 60 he has to worry about cancer and heart disease and dying, women are basically free from having to be overly concerned until about 80.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 24, 2013
at 08:11 PM

Rob, when he post a single one of the "studies he's pouring over". I will vote to reopen. It's a bs question by a troll

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 24, 2013
at 07:10 PM

Coffeesnob, I answered your question in an "edit" attached to my answer above.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 24, 2013
at 07:10 PM

Coffeesnob, I answered you question in an "edit" attached to my answer above.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on February 24, 2013
at 06:58 PM

The question itself is valid, I'll give it that. However, the OP's other questions and comments have given people the idea that he doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt. (Bragging about multiple accounts, telling us that he likes to lick female genitalia, being angry that women have a longer life expectancy and yet advising us that he lives on the streets of Hollywood and wakes up covered in his own vomit with a needle in his arm, which surely has more to do with mortality rate than gender, etc.)

92d67b02a709cad2250f10848f9178e6

(2422)

on February 24, 2013
at 06:57 PM

@ Matt -- Right. But I was asking if the difference in the two rates is statistically significant. I think not.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:14 PM

The difference is 3.7%, the rate is closer to 15%.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 24, 2013
at 11:11 AM

I agree with Rob. OP may be somewhat haphazard and offensive, but what is fake regrading this question?

7c8e227dd8d5bdd77febfdebaa78dc13

(185)

on February 24, 2013
at 05:24 AM

yes, one of them did pass away last year of ovarian cancer, she was in her early 60's.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 24, 2013
at 04:26 AM

would it be a problem if women died 12 years younger?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 24, 2013
at 04:14 AM

The title of this thread is certainly a real question. It got at least one real answer. I don't think this should be closed.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 24, 2013
at 04:01 AM

And what are you pouring over those studies?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:59 AM

-1 for WTF?????

92d67b02a709cad2250f10848f9178e6

(2422)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:41 AM

Referring to the second graph--even when the difference is at peak (age 94-95), men only are only 3.7% more likely to die than women. Is that a statistically significant difference?

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on February 24, 2013
at 12:37 AM

-1 Sources please, not brain fogged assertions. E.g., "Men only need to worry about cancer after 60, women after 80." LOL.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on February 23, 2013
at 11:15 PM

is that a joke? the existence of a gap does not mean it's a problem.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on February 23, 2013
at 11:10 PM

is that a joke? the fact that there's a gap does not mean it is a 'problem' in need of a 'solution'. people live and then they die, and i'm guessing the gap in mortality rate is due to biological differences.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on February 23, 2013
at 10:45 PM

is that a joke? the fact that there's a gap does not mean it needs to be bridged. people live, and then they die.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on February 23, 2013
at 10:43 PM

are you joking? i'm saying the fact that there's a gap doesn't mean it's worth solving. people live, and then they die.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 23, 2013
at 10:31 PM

Did they die? Big difference is women usually survive cancer, men dont

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 23, 2013
at 10:28 PM

WTF do you mean "what's the problem?" That's sick- you don't care about men dying?? You must be a feminist.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on February 23, 2013
at 09:47 PM

assuming this is true, what's the problem?

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on February 23, 2013
at 09:47 PM

assuming this is true, what's the problem.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 23, 2013
at 08:39 PM

Can you include links to some of the references you read?

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3 Answers

6
82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 23, 2013
at 11:02 PM

Is it true that most men die in their 60s, and most women in their 80s?

No, it's not true. "Most" means "more than half."

13 percent of males and 9 percent of females die in their sixties. Much less than half.

32 percent of males and 34 percent of females die in their eighties. That's less than half and not greatly different for the two sexes.

These numbers are for the United States in 2008. The source is given at the end of this answer.

Life expectancy does not mean "average of the death", and the latter is where you see the real difference... The average age for death for a man is probably around 68, while for women its probably around 85.

Averages are the wrong conceptual tool for this kind of question. Here's a better way. Let's start by graphing the probability of dying for men and women at various ages.

(If probabilities seem confusing, multiply them by 100,000 and think of them as the number of people out of 100,000 who die every year.)

As you can see, there is no sudden increase in deaths for men in their sixties or women in their eighties. In fact, there are no large bumps anywhere. Both curves are pretty smooth.

What we do see is that at most ages, men are more likely than women to die. That greater likelihood appears on the graph as the gap between the two curves. That gap is what interests us. It represents the difference between the probability of dying for men and women. It's impossible to tell from this graph when the difference begins, but we can see that it increases smoothly up to a certain point and continues to exist at least until age 100.

is-it-true-that-most-men-die-in-their-60s,-and-most-women-in-their-80s?

The next step is to examine the difference more closely by graphing it. As you can see, the difference begins in adolescence, shows a slight bump in the early 20s, stays steady until the late 30s, and then rises fairly smoothly (although non-linearly) until the 90s. Contrary to your speculations, there is no change in the curve in the sixties or eighties, but there is a change in the early 90s.

(My guess about the bump in the early 20s is that it's caused mainly by male violence and risk-seeking behavior, not disease.)

is-it-true-that-most-men-die-in-their-60s,-and-most-women-in-their-80s?

Edit:

Coffeesnob asked in comments whether the second graph above is statistically significant. It should be noted that these graphs don't show samples. They are based on an actual count of all the people who died in the US in a given year.

The gist of Coffeesnob's question is whether these graphs show real differences between men and women and not just a random fluke. Yes, they do. We know this because the same statistics for other years are almost identical. Here (below) are two more graphs that show the previous year. They are very similar to the graphs above.

The graphs for the two years are least similar at their far right ends. This may be due to the fact that the number of people is smallest there. The left sides of these graphs show enormous numbers of people. The larger the number of data points, the higher the accuracy of the result. Small differences can be statistically significant when the number of data points is large.

is-it-true-that-most-men-die-in-their-60s,-and-most-women-in-their-80s?

is-it-true-that-most-men-die-in-their-60s,-and-most-women-in-their-80s?

Sources:

Tables C, 2, and 3 in United States Life Tables, 2008 published by the US Government.

Tables 2 and 3 in United States Life Tables, 2007 published by the US Government.

92d67b02a709cad2250f10848f9178e6

(2422)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:41 AM

Referring to the second graph--even when the difference is at peak (age 94-95), men only are only 3.7% more likely to die than women. Is that a statistically significant difference?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 24, 2013
at 07:10 PM

Coffeesnob, I answered your question in an "edit" attached to my answer above.

92d67b02a709cad2250f10848f9178e6

(2422)

on February 24, 2013
at 06:57 PM

@ Matt -- Right. But I was asking if the difference in the two rates is statistically significant. I think not.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:14 PM

The difference is 3.7%, the rate is closer to 15%.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 24, 2013
at 07:10 PM

Coffeesnob, I answered you question in an "edit" attached to my answer above.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 24, 2013
at 03:58 AM

The numbers you post are pretty close to Estonia's. Is that where you're from?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy

Estonian men have a much more serious problem with alcohol than women, too. Bad livers might be the cause you're looking for.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1731682/

There's probably no national epidemic of paleo dieting there.

0
7c8e227dd8d5bdd77febfdebaa78dc13

on February 23, 2013
at 10:07 PM

I wish women didn't have to worry about cancer till they are 80. I know a few to many women who I'm close with suffering from or had breast cancer or ovarian cancer. None of whom were close to 80.

7c8e227dd8d5bdd77febfdebaa78dc13

(185)

on February 24, 2013
at 05:24 AM

yes, one of them did pass away last year of ovarian cancer, she was in her early 60's.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 23, 2013
at 10:31 PM

Did they die? Big difference is women usually survive cancer, men dont

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