18

votes

Is it possible to restore eyesight to normal 20/20 without lasik, glasses, or contacts?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 13, 2011 at 2:52 PM

My uncle supposedly stopped wearing glasses, and his vision went back to normal. I'm curious to see what he has to say about it.

Update: Awhile back I emailed him about it, and I don't think this was necessarily the case. I apologize for the misconception.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on April 02, 2013
at 03:29 PM

So, CanC doesn't do anything for floaters. Saw some stuff about serrapeptase and floaters, might be worth a try, but not sure.

810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:54 AM

I wear both I refuse to wear glasses when I'm out as I'm si embarrassed I wore glasses once out I had so many stares of people it's come to the point where I wouldn't leave the house. My eye doctor is terrible she didn't even check my eyes properly within 10minutes said aww what a Shame you might go blind so hearing that has made me depressed

810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:50 AM

Yes it is Jill as I went to eye doctor as soon as he told me my pescription has changed I was in tears, as because of my sight I'm unable to drive or do normal things I see floaters all the time and I'm only 26 years old, my glasses are so thick and due to contact lens I have a scare in my eye so yeah I feel so down because of my sight

5c94900002a867dfa2a8fcd91a576c5e

(456)

on June 27, 2012
at 02:09 AM

I'm -17 in one eye -19 in the other. Is your depression really connected to your vision? How's your eye doctor? Do you wear glasses or contacts? I'm not a candidate for any kind of lasik/laser surgery or anything like that, but have you looked into it? I realized long ago that it's not a big deal unless I make it a big deal and I choose not to. Most people don't even realize I have a vision issue (I wear contacts in public).

Ecb90bbbd5a15868b2592d517a4a5e82

(280)

on June 26, 2012
at 11:16 PM

If you have minor nearsightedness, the changes related to aging - which favor far-sightedness actually - may balance it out a bit. It's very common for very near-sighted people to see their presscriptions reduce a bit after 55, but they will still remain presbyopic.

810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 26, 2012
at 07:46 PM

Monika and sunny get in touch with mr how do u cope on a daily basis I feel so down because of my eyes and the prescription number

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 26, 2012
at 09:20 PM

@ Monika...definitely relate. Not realistic for me as well. I'm -15.5 (R) and -13 (L).

Dfe1d0bab389b2c3d38699abdada6c08

(0)

on April 26, 2012
at 09:05 PM

I am 29 and am -13 in my right eye and -11 in my left. Have been for about 6years now. I am wearing glasses since I was six. I wish there was something that would help but I am afraid thats not realistic in my situation.

Dfe1d0bab389b2c3d38699abdada6c08

(0)

on April 26, 2012
at 09:04 PM

I am 29 and am -13 in my right eye and -11 in my left. Have been for about 6years now. I am wearing sunglasses since I was six. I wish there was something that would help but I am afraid thats not realistic in my situation.

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:31 PM

How can I obtain gradually decreased minus glasses? The glasses-people around me seem to demand a prescription.

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:47 PM

Wow. I'm screwed. I'm minus 7.50 in both eyes, and I'm only 22.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:26 AM

Yikes, that's a strong minus for a 26 year old. Were you diagnosed with degenerative myopia?

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:15 AM

Todd--what was the strength of your plus lenses? Were you undercorrected?

D07a525f9021f8d72bf6aaa52893c795

(1011)

on February 24, 2012
at 12:21 PM

Todd - +1 for you - very interesting. Presbyopia, though? You've got big acclaim from me on my antioxidants vs intermittent fasting thread. Why such a low profile here?

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 03, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Yeah, it's all about those little muscles adjusting the focal point of our optical lens! It has to change, otherwise we wouldn't able to see things at different distances.

0bd9775b305d2a602d496649982bc614

(252)

on November 25, 2011
at 08:18 PM

+1 for posting an interesting question.

C0cfe795b67f6ed0b3fd2f6ae70ad483

(0)

on November 06, 2011
at 04:32 PM

Don't assume that the shape of the eye cannot change! Experimental evidence in animals and humans show that incremental retinal defocus can induce differential tissue growth that causes the eye to lengthen or shorten. I was able to use plus lenses to eliminate +3 diopter myopia, and numerous others on my forum have had similar results. See the discussion here about rehabilitation and retinal remodeling based upon the IRDT theory of myopia: http://gettingstronger.org/rehabilitation/ And the personal accounts of success here: http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,8.0.html

Ef2f6c723983d7fe7a06bd57af6adeed

(1725)

on October 28, 2011
at 02:19 PM

I emailed him. I'm waiting for a response back.

6da7ce6a4a250c46a6e78b5b4e22da83

(987)

on October 23, 2011
at 10:23 AM

Although the eye itself is not a muscle, the shape of the eye is determined in large part by the muscles attached to it. If some of these muscles become tight or weak from under use, they can distort the shape of the eye, causing vision problems like near-sightedness... at least, that is what I read once. I don't know for a fact that it is true.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on October 23, 2011
at 05:49 AM

did you ask him?

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 23, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Do wolves count?

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on October 14, 2011
at 03:56 AM

On a semi-serious note, I had Lasik on July 5, 2001. Unquestionably one of the best decisions of my life. And modern wavefront/custom versions are superior to what I had...

  • Ef2f6c723983d7fe7a06bd57af6adeed

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22 Answers

11
9f187c931f7ce55d375ed5806e254aaf

(820)

on October 14, 2011
at 01:19 PM

Anyone who says you can improve vision with exercises and other similar things doesn't understand the basic mechanism underlying most typical vision problems. In near sighted people (which I am) the problem is with the shape of the eye. Anyone with a basic understanding of optics will figure out the problem immediately. Since the eye is not a muscle no amount of exercise will help. Surgery is the best solution.

6da7ce6a4a250c46a6e78b5b4e22da83

(987)

on October 23, 2011
at 10:23 AM

Although the eye itself is not a muscle, the shape of the eye is determined in large part by the muscles attached to it. If some of these muscles become tight or weak from under use, they can distort the shape of the eye, causing vision problems like near-sightedness... at least, that is what I read once. I don't know for a fact that it is true.

C0cfe795b67f6ed0b3fd2f6ae70ad483

(0)

on November 06, 2011
at 04:32 PM

Don't assume that the shape of the eye cannot change! Experimental evidence in animals and humans show that incremental retinal defocus can induce differential tissue growth that causes the eye to lengthen or shorten. I was able to use plus lenses to eliminate +3 diopter myopia, and numerous others on my forum have had similar results. See the discussion here about rehabilitation and retinal remodeling based upon the IRDT theory of myopia: http://gettingstronger.org/rehabilitation/ And the personal accounts of success here: http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,8.0.html

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 03, 2012
at 04:56 PM

Yeah, it's all about those little muscles adjusting the focal point of our optical lens! It has to change, otherwise we wouldn't able to see things at different distances.

D07a525f9021f8d72bf6aaa52893c795

(1011)

on February 24, 2012
at 12:21 PM

Todd - +1 for you - very interesting. Presbyopia, though? You've got big acclaim from me on my antioxidants vs intermittent fasting thread. Why such a low profile here?

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:15 AM

Todd--what was the strength of your plus lenses? Were you undercorrected?

7
D69d10c3b22d75b09a12f0ebfc7c61b9

on October 13, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Check out the forums at iblindness.org The Bates method does work, I've only been half-heartedly following it and have seen a reduction in prescription from -4.25 in both eyes to -3.50 in just a few weeks and now I feel like I need another reduction. Quackenbush's "Relearning to See" is an excellent book, a great place to start (Bates' writing can be a little dense and hard to read). Pinhole glasses really help, too, especially for computer work, if you don't care that you look like a weirdo :)

4
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on April 26, 2012
at 03:18 PM

I doubt it especially for refractive (light bending) disorders of the eye. Lens correction helps the light focus on the back of the retina, otherwise the focal point where the light actually hits the retina may be off alignment.

The lens of the eye also naturally deteriorates as you get older getting cataracts (cloudyness of the lens) and presbyopia (the eye doesn't focus change as well).

Granted I work in an eye doctors office so I could be biased too.

4
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on November 08, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Not to burst anybody's bubble but there can be statistical fluctuations.

I tried eye exercises and those books that claim to get rid of glasses when I hit puberty and got glasses (low prescription that time). It didn't work for me. I was a bookworm devouring 1 novel per day(Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, etc.) so looking back I'm sure that contributed to my myopia.

I did do some VT - vision therapy and vision training to help with eyestrain at near/computer work which did help subjectively and objectively (measured with prisms). My mother did the same. But neither of us eliminated our glasses.

There are some genes involved with myopia. I do believe in epigenetics - gene interaction with the environment so I don't think everyone is doomed by their genes.

In my experience, a change within +/- 0.50 in one or both eyes is common from year to year because the refraction for glasses is subjective - and even objective measurements like an autorefractor can have more fluctuation then that!

You could have been slightly overcorrected (sometimes by an entire 1.00 diopter in each eye) in the past. Sometimes when people change eye doctors, this is corrected.

I would also like to see someone cured without refractive surgery (LASIK, and the like) from -3.00 D to 0 (no prescription) in their glasses.

That being said, it seems that Vitamin D and being outdoors affects myopia!

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/21/opinion/21wang.html?_r=1&src=rechp

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/752152?src=mp&spon=36

Now high insulin levels can affect myopia. There are other issues that high-carb, glucose, and insulin negatively affect the eye.

http://www.thehealthierlife.co.uk/natural-health-articles/eyesight/myopia-high-carbohydrate-diet-increase-risk-00750.html

Illiterate and less-educated populations have much lower myopia rates vs. more educated and literate populations as shown in China (rural vs. urban) and Israel (Orthodox vs. Reform Jews - the former have to memorize and read a lot more of their holy texts). This is even in populations that share much of the same genes, suggesting the environment of constant near work (computer and reading which was never part of our evolutionary history) and perhaps less sunlight/Vitamin D contributes to myopia.

I think it maybe easier to prevent (especially before the age 18) myopia then to change it afterwards. However, I could happily be proven wrong - track your glasses prescriptions!

Frankly, I have yet to see objective data for refractive error change (myopia, presbyopia, and hyperopia) for the Bates method (eye exercises), so I'm a bit skeptical. Objective data would include corneal topography, axial length changes.

The section on claimed success is all I can support because of the lack of objective data:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bates_method

" As evidence for the effectiveness of the Bates method, proponents point to the many accounts of people allegedly having improved their eyesight by applying it.[3] While these anecdotes may be told and passed on in good faith, several potential explanations exist for the phenomena reported other than a genuine reversal of a refractive error due to the techniques practiced:

Some cases of nearsightedness are recognized as due to a transient spasm of the ciliary muscle, rather than a misshapen eyeball. These are classed as pseudomyopia, of which spontaneous reversal may account for some reports of improvement.[37]

Research has confirmed that when nearsighted subjects remove their corrective lenses, over time there is a limited improvement (termed "blur adaptation") in their unaided visual resolution, even though autorefraction indicates no corresponding change in refractive error.[38] This is believed to occur due to adjustments made in the visual system.[39] One who has been practicing Bates' techniques and notices such improvement may not realize that simply leaving the glasses off would have had the same effect, which may be especially pronounced if the prescription was too strong to begin with.[1]

Visual acuity is affected by the size of the pupil. When it constricts (such as in response to an increase in light), the quality of focus will improve significantly, at the cost of a reduced ability to see in dim light. This is known as the "pinhole effect".[6]

Some eye defects may naturally change for the better with age or in cycles (ophthalmologist Stewart Duke-Elder suggested that this is what happened with Aldous Huxley[40]).

A cataract when first setting in sometimes results in much improved eyesight for a short time. One who happens to have been practicing the Bates method will likely credit it for any improvement experienced regardless of the actual cause.[1]

Some studies have suggested that a learned ability to interpret blurred images may account for perceived improvements in eyesight.[6] Ophthalmologist Walter B. Lancaster had this to say: "Since seeing is only partly a matter of the image on the retina and the sensation it produces, but is in still larger part a matter of the cerebral processes of synthesis, in which memories play a principal role, it follows that by repetition, by practice, by exercises, one builds up a substratum of memories useful for the interpretation of sensations and facilitates the syntheses which are the major part of seeing."[41] Lancaster faulted ophthalmologists in general for neglecting the role of the brain in the process of seeing, "leaving to irregular, half-trained workers the cultivation of that field".[41]

"Flashes of clear vision"

Bates method enthusiasts often report experiencing "flashes" of clear vision, in which eyesight momentarily becomes much sharper, but then reverts back to its previous state.[2] Such flashes are not the result of squinting, and can occur in one eye at a time or in both eyes at once.[42] Observation has suggested that both the quality and duration of such flashes can be increased with practice, with some subjects holding a substantial improvement for several minutes. Tests of such subjects have found that the temporary improvement in visual acuity is real, but per retinoscopy is not due to any change in refractive error.[2] A 1982 study concluded that such occurrences are best explained as a contact lens-like effect of moisture on the eye, based on increased tear action exhibited by 15 out of 17 subjects who experienced such improvement.[6] A more recent series of studies have proposed that such flashes may be caused by "negative accommodation" (i.e. an active flattening of the lens by the ciliary muscles).[43][44]

4
Medium avatar

on October 23, 2011
at 02:33 AM

I had Lasik a decade ago. Love the results; got rid of glasses for both distance and reading. Went back for an eye exam two years ago. 20/20 or better, I forget. These days (age 57) I need reading glasses to read the teeny, tiny print of product ingredient labels: yes, those labels really are getting smaller. Interestingly, sometimes I need magnifier (reading) glasses for the morning paper, but not always. Some days, I can read more easily. It sort of correlates with being rested, focused, attentive.

But you didn't ask about me. You asked the "Is it possible" question. And I think this is truly one of the best questions one can ask. One of my favorite social science researchers, Ellen Langer (Harvard), says: "All it take to prove dogs can yodel is one dog that yodels." So if you can find a way to improve vision without any of the above, you'll teach the rest of us something useful.

Yodel Ay Hee Hoo.

Arf.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 23, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Do wolves count?

4
6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 13, 2011
at 03:26 PM

Come to think of it, when I first wake up in the morning I sometimes forget to put my glasses on because I can see well enough without them. As soon as I start wearing my glasses, my eyes adjust to them and I can't see without them. I think I might try going without them when I won't be driving and see if that will help.

I didn't wear glasses until I got a job that stuck me in front of the computer all the time.

2
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Dry eyes can change your prescription significantly. Curing your dry eyes will "fix" the vision changes brought on by the dry eyes. Common causes of dry eyes are low Omega 3's and low thyroid. My opthamologist was very impressed with the improvements my eyes have made since going paleo. Now if I could only fix the thyroid.

2
Aa5e411ac90ac543cdb7d06a812a908d

on November 06, 2011
at 03:55 PM

From what I've read, it seems that nearsightedness can indeed be cured without surgery, at least in some cases. There's a Finnish opthalmologist named Kaisu Viikari who is using a very unconventional approach towards this problem: gradually decreasing the strength of minus glasses, and eventually wearing plus glasses for reading etc. Check this out: http://www.kaisuviikari.com/testimonials.htm

The treatment is based on the theory, that myopia (nearsightedness) is often really "pseudomyopia", not caused by a lengthened eyeball but instead a spasm of accommodation, a cramp of the ciliary muscle resulting in overaccommodation. When this muscle cramp is released, the patient can again see far-away objects sharply, since the light focuses on the retina and not in front of it. (Or something along those lines, I'm not an opthalmologist and might not know the correct terms... Please correct me if I'm wrong.)

To me, Dr. Viikari's texts make a lot of sense. I had perfectly good eyesight as a child, and only got my first pair of (minus) glasses at age 13. That was a couple of years after starting to spend significant time in front of the computer, my eyes thus focusing more on nearby objects than before. And since then, my eyesight has been degrading, although more slowly with age. Now at 26 I have a -4.25 lens on my right eye and -7.00 on the left. I don't want to wear glasses or contacts for the rest of my life, so eventually I'll either end up in laser eye surgery or find another way to correct my eyesight. Dr. Viikari's approach definitely seems like an interesting possibility.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 26, 2012
at 11:26 AM

Yikes, that's a strong minus for a 26 year old. Were you diagnosed with degenerative myopia?

Dfe1d0bab389b2c3d38699abdada6c08

(0)

on April 26, 2012
at 09:04 PM

I am 29 and am -13 in my right eye and -11 in my left. Have been for about 6years now. I am wearing sunglasses since I was six. I wish there was something that would help but I am afraid thats not realistic in my situation.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 26, 2012
at 09:20 PM

@ Monika...definitely relate. Not realistic for me as well. I'm -15.5 (R) and -13 (L).

Dfe1d0bab389b2c3d38699abdada6c08

(0)

on April 26, 2012
at 09:05 PM

I am 29 and am -13 in my right eye and -11 in my left. Have been for about 6years now. I am wearing glasses since I was six. I wish there was something that would help but I am afraid thats not realistic in my situation.

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:47 PM

Wow. I'm screwed. I'm minus 7.50 in both eyes, and I'm only 22.

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:31 PM

How can I obtain gradually decreased minus glasses? The glasses-people around me seem to demand a prescription.

810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 26, 2012
at 07:46 PM

Monika and sunny get in touch with mr how do u cope on a daily basis I feel so down because of my eyes and the prescription number

1
Edcf8f9a1d13d0e675d9c45e6b3c7460

on April 26, 2012
at 10:15 AM

Re-Lasik... hmmm... This - http://lifeafterlasik.com/ - is an irritatingly sensationalist site, but they may have a point. The one person I know who's had this surgery is indeed stuck using eye drops for life.

I found Bates-style exercises worked - measurably - while I used them, but the changes reversed when I stopped.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 14, 2011
at 03:13 PM

I recommend this piece: http://gettingstronger.org/2010/07/improve-eyesight-and-throw-away-your-glasses/ I tried the training and noticed an improvement.

1
4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on October 13, 2011
at 03:08 PM

In my own experience, my eye problems were related to fatigue. When I was in grad school and reading tons I needed glasses to see far distances. Once I got out of school I didn't need them anymore. Then I got a job that involves a lot of staring at a computer. Now I'm starting to think I need glasses again.

Obviously this doesn't apply to people with serious eyesight issues, but it's something to consider that some of the need for glasses may be lifestyle related and not physiological.

0
C7023fb2a4aaad9af27da49332c41ac1

on April 10, 2013
at 01:14 AM

Sunny Beaches, whoah, -15!!!!! Yikes!!!! I'm 50 years old with -13 !!!!! But I don't feel so bad now. But I like to know where I can get appropriate eye frames.

I have increased my astaxanthin and other antioxidants and notice a slight improvement but not enough to go bare eyed. I have slight astigmatism in one eye and it's not as noticeable when I eat and rest well.

I think extreme myopia skips a generation because my granny was extremely far sighted. Didn't help with my voracious reading, watching a lot of TV really close, eating poorly in my youth and sleeping terribly and wearing a pair of 10 year old prescription which is too weak because it costs over $800 for condensed lenses!

I hope doing paleo at this stage will counter most I'll effects.

0
F1fcc23ea0f840bb95d293574987ff43

on April 02, 2013
at 04:43 AM

my nearsighted eyes affect my day with communicating with people because i cant see everything and appear so blurred

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 10, 2012
at 02:16 PM

Slightly off topic, but how does one get rid of floaters? I've googled around and there's some stuff about too riboflavin in the diet reacting with light, as well as even lutein which one would think should be beneficial for eyes.

I've been taking CanC eye drops which are NAC, and while my eyes do feel better, hasn't done much for floaters - I suppose it does help for cataracts, but I don't any.

If I flick my eyes left/right or up/down, they float away out of the field of vision, but they're still quite annoying. Any way to get them to drop to the bottom or dissolve them quicker? Seems the only thing to do if they get bad is to get them zapped with a laser or replace the vitreous with saline solution - neither options are fun surgeries, I'm sure.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on April 02, 2013
at 03:29 PM

So, CanC doesn't do anything for floaters. Saw some stuff about serrapeptase and floaters, might be worth a try, but not sure.

0
6ce92ee1811404d0c3ff56b600bc0eb4

on September 10, 2012
at 10:11 AM

Nice query it is! I believe it is really promising to restore eyesight normal without lasik, lenses and glasses. If we do proper treatment in our eyes regularly then it can effective for our eyes. So thanks for this nice question. Keep it up!

0
9e6b9b3939c20089ddf7ff881c004fad

(98)

on April 26, 2012
at 07:16 PM

My presbyopia improved quite a bit. Unfortunately, I am wearing glasses for distance now for the first time in my life.

0
E69cdc23a8d09c3bc46a16695276f42b

(123)

on April 26, 2012
at 04:23 PM

I have looked into different ways to heal your eyes...I wear contacts for nearsightedness (I have astigmatism in both eyes, and my powers are around -5.50 and -6.50). I've worn glasses/contacts since I was in 1st grade I think...pretty young. I'm 27 now, and my eyes haven't changed for a couple years but previous to that I've always needed stronger and stronger prescriptions. What would you suggest for someone like me to start with? Do you need to buy a whole bunch of glasses in different (decreasing) powers?? Can this be done while wearing contacts instead?

0
870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:24 PM

I found that improved diet (especially increased fish oil and Vitamin D) improved my astigmatism substantially, and my presbyopia improved somewhat, but I'm never going to see 20/20 uncorrected again in this lifetime.

0
83f42bb3c64ad49e96cc0ac134199201

(0)

on October 23, 2011
at 01:30 AM

I was reading a review about a product that shows you some exercises and diet changes that can improve your eyesight naturally. I think the program was called Vision Without Glasses or something. I read about it on a review site that I commonly check for health products that I'm about to buy. I didn't end up getting it because I talked to my doctor and found some contacts that I really like, but the product looked pretty good. The site was http://www.freehealthstudy.com that had the review of the product.

0
25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on October 14, 2011
at 02:55 AM

You might wish to see Benny Hinn. He seems adept at that sort of thing. http://youtu.be/5lvU-DislkI

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on October 14, 2011
at 03:56 AM

On a semi-serious note, I had Lasik on July 5, 2001. Unquestionably one of the best decisions of my life. And modern wavefront/custom versions are superior to what I had...

0
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 13, 2011
at 03:48 PM

I know there are programs of exercises you can do, but anyone I know who has attempted any of it has not had success. Perhaps it would depend on how bad your eyesight is...but I love the idea of it being possible...let us know if you give it a go.

-1
810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 26, 2012
at 07:44 PM

People add me I feel so depressed because I'm minus 11 in one eye 11.50 in another feel so depressed just want to be normal anybody else relate to me if so get in touch with me wish I new somebody in my boat

810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:54 AM

I wear both I refuse to wear glasses when I'm out as I'm si embarrassed I wore glasses once out I had so many stares of people it's come to the point where I wouldn't leave the house. My eye doctor is terrible she didn't even check my eyes properly within 10minutes said aww what a Shame you might go blind so hearing that has made me depressed

810f7d66fe9f41972b0a5d562ec9d5a3

(-10)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:50 AM

Yes it is Jill as I went to eye doctor as soon as he told me my pescription has changed I was in tears, as because of my sight I'm unable to drive or do normal things I see floaters all the time and I'm only 26 years old, my glasses are so thick and due to contact lens I have a scare in my eye so yeah I feel so down because of my sight

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(456)

on June 27, 2012
at 02:09 AM

I'm -17 in one eye -19 in the other. Is your depression really connected to your vision? How's your eye doctor? Do you wear glasses or contacts? I'm not a candidate for any kind of lasik/laser surgery or anything like that, but have you looked into it? I realized long ago that it's not a big deal unless I make it a big deal and I choose not to. Most people don't even realize I have a vision issue (I wear contacts in public).

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