2

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Is broth made from shrimp shells good for you?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 29, 2012 at 11:38 PM

Is broth made from shrimp shells good for you? If so, what would you suppose the benefits are?

Medium avatar

(2923)

on November 05, 2012
at 08:35 AM

Can't find the link, but there was a comment awhile back that while our bodies regularly "forgets" how to manufacture the enzymes for lactose, our bodies haven't forgotten how to manufacture the enzymes for chitin ...

Medium avatar

(2923)

on November 05, 2012
at 08:28 AM

As long as you're not allergic to shrimp ...

A6e2b231f69366ce825476c5a6dcfff6

(1967)

on November 02, 2012
at 08:46 PM

It's delicious. I'm sure it good for you, but I don't know the details on why.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 30, 2012
at 04:53 PM

I've made it before Amanda and it tastes like walnuts.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on September 30, 2012
at 02:58 AM

Mmm, insect broth.

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4 Answers

best answer

3
E2d885a66875eb01e931d369fac7353c

(427)

on September 29, 2012
at 11:55 PM

You can substitute crab shells for shrimp/lobster shells any seafood stock (AKA fumet) recipe. It's a useful base for soups, bisque, risotto, etc. Here's a basic outline:

Break the crab shells into small pieces (using a roller), then place on a baking sheet (in a single layer) and roast at 400 degrees until they are browned. This will not smell good, so make sure your kitchen is well ventilated. Meanwhile, sweat your mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery) then add some fennel, parsley, bay leaf, lemon rind, etc. Add the roasted crab shells, enough water and/or white wine to cover, and heat until it just barely boils. Reduce the heat to a simmer (180 degrees or so, NOT boiling or bubbling) for about an hour. Be sure to carefully strain through cheesecloth.

2
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on September 30, 2012
at 12:04 AM

You can use ANY chitinous, gelatinous or boney animal parts to make broth.

This includes crab shells, shrimp tails, fish heads, fish fins, insects, bones, etc.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on September 30, 2012
at 02:58 AM

Mmm, insect broth.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 30, 2012
at 04:53 PM

I've made it before Amanda and it tastes like walnuts.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on November 05, 2012
at 08:35 AM

Can't find the link, but there was a comment awhile back that while our bodies regularly "forgets" how to manufacture the enzymes for lactose, our bodies haven't forgotten how to manufacture the enzymes for chitin ...

0
59e818af2184847f09c8a63a45adcdbb

on November 13, 2012
at 07:40 AM

I just eat the shrimp shells!

0
B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on November 05, 2012
at 05:51 AM

I heard that they use chitin as stitching, and it speeds up healing, though I'm not sure how much, if any, would be in a broth...

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