3

votes

is blood type diet for real?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 10, 2011 at 8:09 PM

what do you guys think about blood type diet?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_diet

i have a type a blood and should i go vegetarian because of that?

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 31, 2012
at 06:54 PM

maaaaaann, just noticed a link in my comment, I did not put that there...bullshit!

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 30, 2012
at 08:44 PM

I agree that there is some relevance to the idea. I'm an A and do well on starch, never had a problem with carbohydrate like so many here do. Type O and A make the most sense to me as our A blood type coincides with the australopiths, so more veggies in the diet make sense and vise versa with type O.

D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on December 25, 2012
at 06:06 AM

I think you found the wrong forum.mwhile you are here may I recommend some reading material. "The Vegetarian Myth" by Lierre Kieth. "The Perfect Health Diet" (2nd ed.) by Paul and Shou-Ching Jaminet. "It Starts With Food" by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig. Happy Reading!

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 12, 2011
at 02:35 AM

Hardly a "decent" explanation. I can only vouch for myself and the many people I know that have done it successfully. The statements she makes about losing muscle, not getting enough nutrients etc. are misleading and quite frankly wrong. I've had my blood checked, been to my doctor, he's completely aware of what i'm doing and in all honestly was skeptical until my lab work came back and he saw how much healthier I am. I won't try to convince you or anyone, I just think it's riciculous to jump on the negative bandwagon about something if you've never had any experience or knowledge about it.

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:43 PM

HCG is the quintessential fad diet. Here is a decent explanation http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/truth-about-hcg-for-weight-loss

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 11, 2011
at 06:43 PM

It's a shame you're misinformed and not openminded regarding hcg protocol. This way of losing weight has been around for over 50 years, when done correctly is not harmful but extremely beneficial and life changing. I'm not "starving" by any means, I'm extremely energetic and i'm not into "needles". I take it sublingualy. Before you feel the need to come back at this with more snarky remarks and uneducated statements do some homework. I agree that cutting out sugar and crap is the way to go...some people just need extra help sometimes. No need to be so judgey about it.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 11, 2011
at 02:31 PM

In fact, once I see that one of the first things they say is wrong, I don't need to go any further. The notion that your ideas are the most correct and the most important seems like a familiar one to you. You must be a load of fun in real life.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 11, 2011
at 02:19 PM

your argument is ticking me off because you're being a d*ck for no reason. "that they couldn't interpret phylogenic data" is not what I said, nor does it have anything to do with what i said. What I said was that one of their "givens" upon which they THEN based their interpretations was factually incorrect according to science that was available to them at the time of their writing. Thats like saying France is a country in Africa when it's been mapped that France is in Europe and then going on to discuss French culture. I am not discussing any of their interpretation.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:27 AM

No, bloodtype is a way of believing in magic. HCG is a way of not eating and attempting to make an end run around biology with some badly considered biochemistry. I'm glad hormone shots and starvation works for you. Just not eating crap would have likely also worked. And saved you money. Maybe you like needles. Some people do. Some people like to get their intestines removed. Cutting out the sugar is usually the easiest and most proven method since, oh, like forever. Well, ok, and maybe starving. You may have a point on starving.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:23 AM

As for their premise I said above it was DOA when they couldn't account for an evolutionarily plausible explanation for the selective forces that would have allowed people to make appropriate fitness decisions without the invention blood typing. All the other bad assumptions take a secondary seat to the primacy of evolutionary biology. Or biochemistry. Which they got wrong too. That they couldn't interpret phylogenetic data to support their biochemically impossible and evolutionarily impossible scenario is, yes, irrelevant. That's just kicking a dead donkey there.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:20 AM

What do scientists have to do with oil spills? The engineers are that way---> Genetic engineering? What about it? I rather enjoy it. Genes were meant to be moved around, it is why nature does it all the time.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on April 11, 2011
at 02:34 AM

the main problem behind the ideology is the fact that the great apes also share our primate blood types. A gorilla could be an O or an A but they continue to eat their species-specific diet...

47e1e207e9cd7df2a5adcf571f17f76f

(288)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:52 AM

While I totally agree that the blood type diet makes no sense, I had to comment on the logic of this response. As I understand it, the premise of the diet is based on the supposed evolutionary history of the blood types - and suggests that we would be well off now to use our blood type information to tweak our diets accordingly (again, I don't buy into this). The argument you are making (that our ancestors would've needed to know their type to eat optimally) is like saying neanderthal man wouldn't have been able to eat an optimal diet without being able to track macronutrients on fitday.com.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Well it's a good thing I'm type O- then. Only thing it does for me is engender endless donation pleas from the Red Cross (O is universal donor, but requires O transfusions) and I can't do it anymore, get too sick and shocky every time.

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 11, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Look, i'm not trying to argue here...I realize we aren't meant to "evolved" to exist on 500 calories a day, at least not exist and be healthy....When I say hcg isn't a "fad" diet I mean it in the sense that it is used to lose weight that perhaps someone hadn't been able to lose before due to whatever reasons (everyone is individual). It is a weight loss regime that works for many people, myself included and once i've finished this round I will continue to eat unprocessed. Perhaps we are confusing "diets" with "lifestyle"... The bloodtype diet is actually a "way" of eating just like paleo.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:51 PM

but i agree with you that even most scientists can't do science right, but maybe I'm just pi**ed of with scientists lately. What with oil spills, fracking, genetic engineering and other things that tick me off.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:50 PM

Absolutely no scientific basis. Cmplete mumbo-jumbo. Worse than the magical life-force that evaporates when you cook food (raw foodists).

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:49 PM

the notion that they couldn't get the basic premise of their book into alignment with current scientific knowledge isn't relevant when determining the veracity of their claim? uh, ok.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:35 PM

That isn't even relevant--ABO antigens have nothing to do with food metabolism, other than transporting oxygen to the appropriate tissues (although, I suppose there might be some variance in the how sensitive different ABO types are to glycation, but we're all subject to the deleterious effects of glycation). So you're left with ABO types co-varying with other metabolic factors. Maybe. But you have to do the genomics for that. D'Adamo is not a bioinformaticist or human genetic expert. Naturopaths shouldn't try to do science. I mean even most scientists can't do science right.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:19 PM

Sure, there is ample genetic variation in the human population such that some people can be vegan and be fine and some people can subsist on McDonalds and be fine. ~7 billion people worth of genetic variation will do that. That variance is not encoded in ABO bloodtypes and it is likely a trivial percentage of the population (there's been inadequate time to select on high fitness vegans or McDonalds phenotypes or anything in between). Therefore, for most humans eating stuff that on a macronutrient level is what hominids are adapted for is obviously going to work out best >90% of the time.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 10:08 PM

Uh, we didn't evolve to go on 500 calories a day and need HCG shots either. Therefore it is a stupid fad diet. We evolved to not eat tons of sugar (specifically fructose), tons of n-6 fats, and tons of grains. Therefore, when avoiding those things (mostly the sugar, but the other stuff helps too), we stay lean in the absence of some other pathology. You can either work with a couple million years of hominid evolution or try to fight it with gimmicks. Working with your genes is usually easier.

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 10, 2011
at 09:58 PM

I am on the HCG diet as well as paleo in between rounds and unless you've done it, or have had some sort of real experience with it you might want to understand it better before calling it a "fad" diet. I'm on my 2nd round, feeling awesome and can attest to the fact that it works. Like any lifestyle of eating unprocessed foods it helps you to overcome carb addiction, sugar addiction and learn portion sizes and truly change the way you live. Just wanted to clarify that.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on April 10, 2011
at 08:17 PM

Discussed here http://paleohacks.com/questions/879/blood-type-diet#axzz1J9Z7qJPF and no, it's a joke.

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16 Answers

6
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on July 04, 2011
at 01:36 PM

My wife and I subscribe to the theory that different diets are better for different people, and it has some relationship to blood types. I don't think it's as simple as "this type eats this food" but I definitely think there is something to it.

I am type O and definitely do best on the Paleo type diet. Type O's were supposedly the "hunter gatherers" so this fits the theory. My wife is type A and definitely does best on a grain and vegetable based diet. Her diet is not Paleo at all and she would not do well with it, she can't eat that much meat and fat and needs her starches and carbs.

We often ask friends and family what their blood types and dietary preferences are and the data points we get are way too common and correlated to be coincidence. Almost without exception, the type O's that we know are enthusiastic meat eaters, while the type A's and B's are either omnivorous or prefer various starches and grains much more than the type O's. This is all anecdotal but I think there is something to it.

This isn't to say that everyone we talk to fits into 2 or 3 diets, it is just a tendency. For example we ask people, if your plate had meat, salad and pasta/rice on it, what would your first bite be? For me, it is always the meat, in fact sometimes I will finish the meat before going on to anything else. My wife does the same with the starch. The answer that people have to this question says something about their general dietary preferences.

I think the science behind books like "Eat Right 4 Your Type" is iffy at best, and maybe it doesn't have to do with blood type at all, but some other aspect of human lineage that is itself correlated with blood type. Doesn't it make sense that, among the billions of people in the world, people of different genetic backgrounds need different diets based on how they evolved over the preceding thousands of years? There are studies that show that humans evolve in periods as short a 100 years, so over 10,000 years or 300-400 generations there is ample time for a culture to become adapted to a particular diet.

This would also explain why some people do better on the Paleo diet than others. It is clear from the feedback on this site that the diet isn't for everyone -- some people have spectacular success, and others just have problems.

I would be curious to see the results of a poll of the blood type of people that are successful with the Paleo diet. My guess is that there would be an uncommonly high number of type O's compared to the general population.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 31, 2012
at 06:54 PM

maaaaaann, just noticed a link in my comment, I did not put that there...bullshit!

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 30, 2012
at 08:44 PM

I agree that there is some relevance to the idea. I'm an A and do well on starch, never had a problem with carbohydrate like so many here do. Type O and A make the most sense to me as our A blood type coincides with the australopiths, so more veggies in the diet make sense and vise versa with type O.

5
Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:22 AM

Blood type refers to the presence of different classes of surface glycoproteins on red blood cells. These proteins are entirely irrelevant to the physiology of nutrition or digestion. That is unless you've been pumped with blood of a different type. Then, your digestion may be affected, but that'll be the least of your worries.

5
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:28 PM

well, for one thing, the blood type diet claims that "O" is the oldest blood type and makes its recommendations based on that, but science has it fairly well accepted that that premise is wrong and "A" is likely the oldest blood type (this info was available when that book was written)... so you gotta figure if they couldn't get that basic fact right then...

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:23 AM

As for their premise I said above it was DOA when they couldn't account for an evolutionarily plausible explanation for the selective forces that would have allowed people to make appropriate fitness decisions without the invention blood typing. All the other bad assumptions take a secondary seat to the primacy of evolutionary biology. Or biochemistry. Which they got wrong too. That they couldn't interpret phylogenetic data to support their biochemically impossible and evolutionarily impossible scenario is, yes, irrelevant. That's just kicking a dead donkey there.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:20 AM

What do scientists have to do with oil spills? The engineers are that way---> Genetic engineering? What about it? I rather enjoy it. Genes were meant to be moved around, it is why nature does it all the time.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:51 PM

but i agree with you that even most scientists can't do science right, but maybe I'm just pi**ed of with scientists lately. What with oil spills, fracking, genetic engineering and other things that tick me off.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 11, 2011
at 02:31 PM

In fact, once I see that one of the first things they say is wrong, I don't need to go any further. The notion that your ideas are the most correct and the most important seems like a familiar one to you. You must be a load of fun in real life.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:35 PM

That isn't even relevant--ABO antigens have nothing to do with food metabolism, other than transporting oxygen to the appropriate tissues (although, I suppose there might be some variance in the how sensitive different ABO types are to glycation, but we're all subject to the deleterious effects of glycation). So you're left with ABO types co-varying with other metabolic factors. Maybe. But you have to do the genomics for that. D'Adamo is not a bioinformaticist or human genetic expert. Naturopaths shouldn't try to do science. I mean even most scientists can't do science right.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:49 PM

the notion that they couldn't get the basic premise of their book into alignment with current scientific knowledge isn't relevant when determining the veracity of their claim? uh, ok.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 11, 2011
at 02:19 PM

your argument is ticking me off because you're being a d*ck for no reason. "that they couldn't interpret phylogenic data" is not what I said, nor does it have anything to do with what i said. What I said was that one of their "givens" upon which they THEN based their interpretations was factually incorrect according to science that was available to them at the time of their writing. Thats like saying France is a country in Africa when it's been mapped that France is in Europe and then going on to discuss French culture. I am not discussing any of their interpretation.

4
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on July 04, 2011
at 03:46 PM

My blood type (A) recommends a vegetarian, agrarian diet.

I'm allergic or intolerant of legumes and grains. Severely. I've had leaky gut and gastric upset most of my life, which accelerated in my late 20's with inability to eat practically anything without getting horrendously sick... and then I found Paleo.

So, if I "ate right for my blood type", I'd be dead. Unless you can be pulse/gluten free and still be a vegan (30BAD maybe? I think I'd get sick of that pretty quickly too).

The diet partially succeeds because it introduces structure to an otherwise SAD dieter's existence. When you introduce some structure and cognizance of what you are stuffing in your cake hole, some success happens.

Also, Coach Dan John's constant reminder in his books "Everything works for about 6 weeks".

4
Af939911afa817f79a4625d4f503c735

on April 10, 2011
at 10:57 PM

I like Robb Wolf's answer: "It works if you assume that everyone is Type O." I'm assuming that the recommendation for Type O is a Paleo-type diet.

In other words, no your blood type has no affect on how you metabolize food.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Well it's a good thing I'm type O- then. Only thing it does for me is engender endless donation pleas from the Red Cross (O is universal donor, but requires O transfusions) and I can't do it anymore, get too sick and shocky every time.

3
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on July 04, 2011
at 01:20 PM

An excellent rebuttal of the blood type diet by Don Matesz - http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2010/12/blood-type-diet-primal-perspective.html

2
4929a87e3f7438f18a0afbdde291ed5e

on December 25, 2012
at 01:32 AM

My blood type is A+. I tried becoming a vegetarian (not because of my blood type, but for ethical reasons) and was never more sick in my entire life. I had chronic bronchial infections, recurrence of long-gone childhood asthma, allergies worsened, chemical sensitivities worsened, etc. I didn't put 2 and 2 together at the time, but when I'd finally had enough and went to a naturopath that started me down the road to Paleo (my naturopath is a Vegan who is now considering changing to Paleo because of my 180 turnaround, mind you). I became fairly strict Paleo a little over a year ago (albeit I do eat a bit too much dark chocolate and indulge in macadamia nuts too often) - no dairy, no nightshades. Mostly meat, fat and veggies and fruit. I would consider myself low carb to moderate carb depending on the fruit that is in season. :) I feel the best I've felt in my 43 years of life Off the charts energy, haven't been sick since I started, haven't had a headache in over a year (serious migraines before Paleo). If I had decided to try the blood type diet I can't imagine in what horrible condition I would be in right now. We are all designed to eat hunter/gatherer diets. Period.

2
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on April 11, 2011
at 01:33 AM

This stuff is only confusing people out there who don't have the background to see through right away. My Mom read it and believed it, because it sounds "scientific". It took me a while of very delicate explanation that it's ok for her to eat beef...

idiots. they just want to make money, but they can hurt people over it.

1
75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on December 24, 2012
at 08:55 PM

One judge of how "real" a diet is based on the number of books on the subject found in secondhand bookstores. I often see books on blood type diet, zone diets, Atkins diet, etc. Although in part this means these books sold well, I view it as an indicator the diets have not been successful ... or the books are simply bad. Interestingly, I never see Paleo diet books in these shops ... and I believe these books have been selling fairly well. Makes me believe people keep these books as reference as they stick with the Paleo diet for the long term.

_Lazza

1
991667372fc6c7f8dd16393deac7751f

on December 24, 2012
at 08:38 PM

Despite the quasi-science of it all the blood type diet seems to work for a lot of people, not just for weight loss but to help heal certain medical conditions over time. I am O +, and supposed to eat a simple low carb hunter/gatherer diet( basically the Paleo , which I am now embracing!) Through trial and error, over many years, I found that it IS really the best way to eat for me- I have tons of energy, feel great and my skin and muscle tone improve, my weight stays stable, joints feel better etc. When I was in college all my artsy friends were vegetarian, and I bought into that for a while, with disastrous results. I had NO energy at all, was terribly hungry all the time, had digestive/skin issues from eating the legumes, even developed anemia, even though I was taking supplements, eating lots of greens etc. My doctor told me to start eating meat again or else. And when I did I felt like superwoman! Lesson learned. I think everyone has to experiment and find out what works for their body. Id be curious if any of you have seen improvement with arthritis after eating Paleo for a while . According to D'Adamo type Os get the worst forms of arthritis and it is aggravated by grains, dairy and refined sugars, which they should avoid. Seems to be true for me. Long live us carnivores!

1
9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 08:14 PM

Until we had regular blood typing available, how would a human have known what blood type they were? They'd have no idea. How would we evolve a system for feeding ourselves that required the invention of technology that wouldn't be readily available until a couple hundred thousand years later? From first principles (we'll ignore that RBCs don't digest food, adding another level of biological implausibility) this makes zero sense.

47e1e207e9cd7df2a5adcf571f17f76f

(288)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:52 AM

While I totally agree that the blood type diet makes no sense, I had to comment on the logic of this response. As I understand it, the premise of the diet is based on the supposed evolutionary history of the blood types - and suggests that we would be well off now to use our blood type information to tweak our diets accordingly (again, I don't buy into this). The argument you are making (that our ancestors would've needed to know their type to eat optimally) is like saying neanderthal man wouldn't have been able to eat an optimal diet without being able to track macronutrients on fitday.com.

0
158f2bd8e6ae74faf61f64de8757c851

on July 04, 2011
at 01:09 PM

Karin is right - Hcg is an amazing weight loss program that totally works. I have loads of friends who've been on it with astounding results. It has changed the shape of my body and it's quite amazing what it does to your mind and your mental link to food. It is brilliant, although it's hard to assess it without actually doing it yourself or having people around you doing it. It's extraordinary, and the doctor that formulated the program several decades ago had a brilliant mind. Wikipedia states that he, amongst other things

Dr. Albert T. W. Simeons, (1900 - 1970), english endocrinologist, schooled in Germany. During short stay in Africa he wanted to find a cure for Tropical Diseases. Then he went to India in 1930. He was awarded with the Red Cross Order of Merit for his discoveries in new methods that would lead to a cure for malaria.

He wrote a wonderful book Man's Presumptuous Brain which examines the psychosomatic root of many conditions. Interesting and ahead of his time.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 11, 2011
at 04:50 PM

I can give credit to the blood type diet for one thing. I am a type O and when it came out in the mid-1990s, it helped me overcome the idea that a semi-vegetarian diet (white meat) was ideal for me. Back in those days, I frequented (mostly trolled :) the ER4YT forum and the Type As, who were recommended quasi-vegetarian diets), fared the worst of all on the diet. I would call it a "Fad diet" and unfortunately, Dr. D'Adamo could never fall out of love with his own theory and touts it to this very day.

0
A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 10, 2011
at 10:05 PM

I don't prescribe to "blood type" being an indicator of how and what you should eat, but I think there are all types of healthy eating options. I've personally been vegan, vegetarian and now mostly what one would call "paleo" (I stick with unprocessed foods and no grains/legumes and very little sugar) and I will say that while I was vegan/vegetarian my health was not optimal even though I was technically eating "healthy" foods..I was not a junk food vegan by any means but couldn't seem to sustain my energy or lose weight or just feel "good". It was a 4 year process...I finally decided to go back to eating meats...I felt much better. I do know there are some folks who do very well on vegan diet and for whatever reason it works...I think it's just all individual and you have to listen to your body and really gauge how foods make you feel. Unless you eat only raw foods or only vegetables and fruits and nuts and seeds you'll be ingesting a lot of processed foods which in my opinion (which probably doesn't count for much) isn't the best option. What is making you feel the need to go vegan? If it's animal "rights" issues you can always try to opt for humane practice farms, etc. If it's health issues then not sure what to say other than "listen to your body" (again).

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 11:19 PM

Sure, there is ample genetic variation in the human population such that some people can be vegan and be fine and some people can subsist on McDonalds and be fine. ~7 billion people worth of genetic variation will do that. That variance is not encoded in ABO bloodtypes and it is likely a trivial percentage of the population (there's been inadequate time to select on high fitness vegans or McDonalds phenotypes or anything in between). Therefore, for most humans eating stuff that on a macronutrient level is what hominids are adapted for is obviously going to work out best >90% of the time.

0
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 10, 2011
at 09:47 PM

Blood type diet is just another fad diet. Along the same vein, HCG diet, 17-day diet, Dukane diet, etc ad nausea are fads.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 10, 2011
at 10:08 PM

Uh, we didn't evolve to go on 500 calories a day and need HCG shots either. Therefore it is a stupid fad diet. We evolved to not eat tons of sugar (specifically fructose), tons of n-6 fats, and tons of grains. Therefore, when avoiding those things (mostly the sugar, but the other stuff helps too), we stay lean in the absence of some other pathology. You can either work with a couple million years of hominid evolution or try to fight it with gimmicks. Working with your genes is usually easier.

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 10, 2011
at 09:58 PM

I am on the HCG diet as well as paleo in between rounds and unless you've done it, or have had some sort of real experience with it you might want to understand it better before calling it a "fad" diet. I'm on my 2nd round, feeling awesome and can attest to the fact that it works. Like any lifestyle of eating unprocessed foods it helps you to overcome carb addiction, sugar addiction and learn portion sizes and truly change the way you live. Just wanted to clarify that.

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 11, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Look, i'm not trying to argue here...I realize we aren't meant to "evolved" to exist on 500 calories a day, at least not exist and be healthy....When I say hcg isn't a "fad" diet I mean it in the sense that it is used to lose weight that perhaps someone hadn't been able to lose before due to whatever reasons (everyone is individual). It is a weight loss regime that works for many people, myself included and once i've finished this round I will continue to eat unprocessed. Perhaps we are confusing "diets" with "lifestyle"... The bloodtype diet is actually a "way" of eating just like paleo.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:27 AM

No, bloodtype is a way of believing in magic. HCG is a way of not eating and attempting to make an end run around biology with some badly considered biochemistry. I'm glad hormone shots and starvation works for you. Just not eating crap would have likely also worked. And saved you money. Maybe you like needles. Some people do. Some people like to get their intestines removed. Cutting out the sugar is usually the easiest and most proven method since, oh, like forever. Well, ok, and maybe starving. You may have a point on starving.

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 11, 2011
at 06:43 PM

It's a shame you're misinformed and not openminded regarding hcg protocol. This way of losing weight has been around for over 50 years, when done correctly is not harmful but extremely beneficial and life changing. I'm not "starving" by any means, I'm extremely energetic and i'm not into "needles". I take it sublingualy. Before you feel the need to come back at this with more snarky remarks and uneducated statements do some homework. I agree that cutting out sugar and crap is the way to go...some people just need extra help sometimes. No need to be so judgey about it.

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on April 11, 2011
at 07:43 PM

HCG is the quintessential fad diet. Here is a decent explanation http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/truth-about-hcg-for-weight-loss

A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on April 12, 2011
at 02:35 AM

Hardly a "decent" explanation. I can only vouch for myself and the many people I know that have done it successfully. The statements she makes about losing muscle, not getting enough nutrients etc. are misleading and quite frankly wrong. I've had my blood checked, been to my doctor, he's completely aware of what i'm doing and in all honestly was skeptical until my lab work came back and he saw how much healthier I am. I won't try to convince you or anyone, I just think it's riciculous to jump on the negative bandwagon about something if you've never had any experience or knowledge about it.

-1
A59e1a46f9fccf4353de1bea70a68f67

on December 23, 2012
at 02:45 AM

You shouldn't go vegetarian because the blood group book tells you to, but many years ago I believed it and went pescetarian. I felt a lot better, and it led me on the path to vegetarian, then vegan to fruitarian. I have never felt better in all my life. I don't believe in the blood group diet, but I do believe that all humans will be healthier without meat, eggs and dairy, so long as those products are replaced with whole fruits and vegetables rather than processed crap. I would suggest trying it. You will feel better without the meat and dairy!

D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on December 25, 2012
at 06:06 AM

I think you found the wrong forum.mwhile you are here may I recommend some reading material. "The Vegetarian Myth" by Lierre Kieth. "The Perfect Health Diet" (2nd ed.) by Paul and Shou-Ching Jaminet. "It Starts With Food" by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig. Happy Reading!

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