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If you're going to drink or use milk, is skim milk a bad option if grass fed?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 27, 2010 at 11:22 AM

I was reading a "dietary approach" section on a new crossfit-esque startup website when I came across a line commenting on dairy. Their approach was that if you're going to have milk included make sure it is grass fed whole milk. The next comment was that skim milk leaves a poor nutrient profile and damaged proteins due to the process that removes the fat.

Does anyone have information to back up or refute that statement? I know that paleo involves eating a lot of fat but I was using a little of the skim milk as a post workout carb/protein supplement.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:12 AM

"Natural isn't optimal" is true in some situations, but is a pretty broad generalization. To state, "Cows milk is totally unnatural" requires context. Unnatural to whom? I would imagine that a baby cow finds it pretty darn "natural"!

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:55 PM

What about all the nutrients? Basically a superfood in nutrient density even without all the magical benefits you listed

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:54 PM

Humans process almost everything in the wild. Natural isn't optimal. Cows milk is totally unnatural.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:51 PM

The only part that has oxidized cholesterol is the small amount of milk powder they add, if they even add it which they probably don't if its organic. I'm pretty sure they use egg yolk powder for those animal studies on oxidized cholesterol which contains a lot of cholesterol. The couple mg found in skim milk powder probably is benign.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 28, 2010
at 06:52 AM

Nike nike nike :D (Do it, do it, do it. Please :)

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 03:10 PM

http://img.skitch.com/20101027-pxu7udwx9cr5d8xwfp1bhhxbdp.jpg

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 03:03 PM

But in short, the homogenization process increases surface area of fat globules, leading to greater oxidization. Pressure is also known to be an agent of oxidation. It's not hard to put two and two together.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 03:00 PM

Ikco, for what? I can do a blog post on oxidized shit in homogenized milk.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 27, 2010
at 02:26 PM

Evidence please ?

1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on October 27, 2010
at 02:24 PM

I guess the original purpose was to get the carbs/protein that is needed post workout without adding a bunch of calories from fat. In order to be more efficient. I think I'll just get whole milk from here on out. I don't think I have access to whole raw milk

8254c4e4d1f2aedd09cb9608b8777654

(140)

on October 27, 2010
at 12:44 PM

I agree. We drink only raw whole milk, cow and goat. Don't like the separation?, then just shake before pouring. Also, I have read that to make 1% or 2% milk (I'm not sure about skim), all the fat is removed and then some is added back in in the form of powder. And this process leads to oxidation. My rule is eat nothing that has the words lowfat in it. That includes yogurt, milk, cheese, etc.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on October 27, 2010
at 12:22 PM

Is it raw? Pastuerization does a whole lot of damage too

1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on October 27, 2010
at 11:23 AM

Just in case there was doubt; I was using grass fed skim milk from organic valley.

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7 Answers

3
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 27, 2010
at 01:42 PM

Remember the principle about this whole paleo idea is unprocessed things more or less as they come from nature! Now, whether you consume dairy at all is indeed a side issue and up to you, but the underlying idea of all the food we consume is that it is something we have evolved with, as close to its nature as possible. Skim milk, i would argue, is the opposite of this principle.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:54 PM

Humans process almost everything in the wild. Natural isn't optimal. Cows milk is totally unnatural.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:12 AM

"Natural isn't optimal" is true in some situations, but is a pretty broad generalization. To state, "Cows milk is totally unnatural" requires context. Unnatural to whom? I would imagine that a baby cow finds it pretty darn "natural"!

2
Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:46 PM

The problem with skim-milk is that they add milk powder to it.

Milk powder is a an undesirable ingredient because it is often produced via a process called "spray drying".

Spray drying is "no bueno" because the liquid is atomized (essentially shot out of a high-pressure nozzle) which increases the surface area exposed to the high temperature gases used to dry the liquid. This results in high levels of oxidized cholesterol.

If you want "skim milk", just make it at home by pouring the cream off of unhomogenized whole milk (grass-fed, etc.) You can add the cream to your coffee and use the rest for whatever you use milk for.

Spray Dryer Schematic From Wikipedia.com

if-you're-going-to-drink-or-use-milk,-is-skim-milk-a-bad-option-if-grass-fed?

Laboratory-scale spray dryer. A=Solution or suspension to be dried in, B=Atomization gas in, 1= Drying gas in, 2=Heating of drying gas, 3=Spraying of solution or suspension, 4=Drying chamber, 5=Part between drying chamber and cyclone, 6=Cyclone, 7=Drying gas is taken away, 8=Collection vessel of product, arrows mean that this is co-current lab-spraydryer

1
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:13 AM

if grass fed- a big YES. Skim milk isn't even milk. If you can get Raw- drink that.

1
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on October 19, 2011
at 11:01 PM

Skim milk is oxidized cholesterol. In fact any low-fat dairy is oxidized cholesterol because the processing to make any lowfat dairy oxidizes the cholesterol! In animal studies oxidized cholesterol produces heart disease and cancer

http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/food/is-skim-milk-making-you-fat-2479492/

All the dairy I have is full-fat grass-fed non-homogenized.

I recommend working your way from skim, 1%, 2%, and then to whole milk to get used to the taste if whole seems too heavy. My family had no trouble adjusting to whole yogurt, heavy cream and cheese!

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:51 PM

The only part that has oxidized cholesterol is the small amount of milk powder they add, if they even add it which they probably don't if its organic. I'm pretty sure they use egg yolk powder for those animal studies on oxidized cholesterol which contains a lot of cholesterol. The couple mg found in skim milk powder probably is benign.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on October 27, 2010
at 01:27 PM

Pasturized skim milk is probably bad for you. Everything good in milk is deactivated or removed, leaving only the bad. The good include the undenatured whey, the various immune enhancers and pathogen defense mecahnisms, lactase, and high quality fat (CLA, saturated fat, medium chain triglycerides, monounstatured fat, and balanced --but low-- polyunsaturated fat). Skim milk has casein (a potentialy troublesome protein) and lactose (not a particularly good carb).

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 19, 2011
at 11:55 PM

What about all the nutrients? Basically a superfood in nutrient density even without all the magical benefits you listed

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 11:53 AM

Why would you chose skim milk? Unless it's a taste reason, I can't see what NOT chose whole milk. More nutrients and those nutrients are more bio-available. Actually, chose whole un-homogenized milk- there is evidence that the homogenization is what damages the proteins. For my friends who don't like the globs of fat in this milk, I skim it off and use it to make butter...it's like making your own skim milk but not as harsh of a industrial process.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 03:00 PM

Ikco, for what? I can do a blog post on oxidized shit in homogenized milk.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 28, 2010
at 06:52 AM

Nike nike nike :D (Do it, do it, do it. Please :)

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 03:10 PM

http://img.skitch.com/20101027-pxu7udwx9cr5d8xwfp1bhhxbdp.jpg

8254c4e4d1f2aedd09cb9608b8777654

(140)

on October 27, 2010
at 12:44 PM

I agree. We drink only raw whole milk, cow and goat. Don't like the separation?, then just shake before pouring. Also, I have read that to make 1% or 2% milk (I'm not sure about skim), all the fat is removed and then some is added back in in the form of powder. And this process leads to oxidation. My rule is eat nothing that has the words lowfat in it. That includes yogurt, milk, cheese, etc.

1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on October 27, 2010
at 02:24 PM

I guess the original purpose was to get the carbs/protein that is needed post workout without adding a bunch of calories from fat. In order to be more efficient. I think I'll just get whole milk from here on out. I don't think I have access to whole raw milk

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 27, 2010
at 02:26 PM

Evidence please ?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 27, 2010
at 03:03 PM

But in short, the homogenization process increases surface area of fat globules, leading to greater oxidization. Pressure is also known to be an agent of oxidation. It's not hard to put two and two together.

0
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on October 20, 2011
at 12:12 AM

I think all skim milk is a bad option, grass fed or not.

This article explains why skim milk is bad: http://naturalbias.com/why-skim-milk-isnt-as-healthy-as-you-may-think/

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