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Human Nutrition Class

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 25, 2011 at 9:19 PM

What are some good questions to ask my human nutrition professor next semester to ruffle his feathers??

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on June 29, 2011
at 06:47 PM

If your goal is to fail the class, just don't do the work and nobody's feathers will get ruffled.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:05 AM

Ive done that! Sent my teacher a (very long) blog I wrote about saturated fat. I think she was a little shocked but was quite receptive

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:49 AM

As a student I can add that the rest of us hate that one person who thinks they're smarter than the prof and is constantly interrupting the lecture and asking annoying questions to try and show them up.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:28 AM

As a professor, I can tell you that ruffling feathers *can lower your grade.

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:17 AM

Biochem is a great rufflin' tool.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on June 26, 2011
at 12:00 AM

I agree, but the correct protocol is 1. Learn biochemistry. 2. Ruffle the heck out of 'em.

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 11:16 PM

I'm changing my name to bambambastard :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 25, 2011
at 11:09 PM

I agree with everything but the side remarks. Those just piss people off. I know because I did it :)

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10 Answers

10
C2ad96801ec1e22d2bf62475b6e52751

(1416)

on June 25, 2011
at 11:50 PM

For Christ's sake, stop trying to ruffle feathers and learn biochemistry or something.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:28 AM

As a professor, I can tell you that ruffling feathers *can lower your grade.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on June 26, 2011
at 12:00 AM

I agree, but the correct protocol is 1. Learn biochemistry. 2. Ruffle the heck out of 'em.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:49 AM

As a student I can add that the rest of us hate that one person who thinks they're smarter than the prof and is constantly interrupting the lecture and asking annoying questions to try and show them up.

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on June 26, 2011
at 01:17 AM

Biochem is a great rufflin' tool.

7
7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 26, 2011
at 12:30 AM

Noooo. Don't be "that guy" in the lecture hall.

Anyway, I would never take a human nutrition course because I would probably incur brain damage through headdesking. I would second the suggestion to take biochemistry which is WAY more interesting, and will allow you to sound like you know what you're talking about if you still want to ruffle the feathers of some poor nutrition professor, instead of just being annoying for the sake of it.

3
39a1a0bc7855c084ac59df60fdf9c0dd

(1505)

on June 29, 2011
at 05:34 PM

What is the point of trying to ruffle feathers? Do you think that will turn people on to your point of view?

How about asking questions in which you are genuinely interested and that will contribute to the discussion.

3
Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

on June 28, 2011
at 12:52 AM

I'm going back for an M.S. in nutrition this fall and I can tell you I'm going to keep my mouth shut, get my 4.0 and get my RD certification so I can open my own paleo practice and tell people what they should really be eating to get healthy. It's going to be hard as hell but it's the only way for me to open my own practice so it'll be worth it in the end. I don't have anything personal against any of my professors, they're just teaching what they were taught and I don't want to make their lives harder, especially when my grade depends on it.

3
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on June 27, 2011
at 04:48 PM

Secretly slip random research studies that contradict the professors teachings on their desk or under their office door.

Don't say anything in class to contradict unless you can site studies and have copies with you. Proof is in the pudding. You will look like a fool if you say stuff like..'i heard' or 'i read' or 'it just makes sense'.

If the professor is way too far off base (i.e. a total idiot), don't even bother. It will just earn you a bad grade on top of not learning anything useful.

Professors like those students who show an interest by asking questions and interacting. If makes them feel like you aren't just there for credit. Just keep it real -real info, real studies, and professional.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:05 AM

Ive done that! Sent my teacher a (very long) blog I wrote about saturated fat. I think she was a little shocked but was quite receptive

3
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on June 25, 2011
at 09:50 PM

I took a couple different nutrition classes and quite thoroughly pissed the professor off by a) refusing to address her as "Dr." and b) with the papers I wrote and c) other students would ask me questions after class at my desk and during break. If you're just trying to ruffle feathers I think it's pointless in the face-to-face setting unless you really know your stuff and make some really good comments that you can get your classmates to rally with you to challenge the status quo (make sure you bring your primary sources). If you're in an online environment were you get to post papers that everybody can see you can really piss the teacher off by sucking up time so they have write counter arguments. But just don't do it for the sake of pissing people off. Do it because you want to dispel faulty science. Ultimately if you convince the teacher there is truth in what your saying and you do it in a tactful and academic matter--while you might not change the curriculum--you might just open their mind enough to where they encourage other students to explore the alternatives.

2
226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 09:35 PM

"Did you know?" questions always throw off textbook type professors. This semester was great for me because I did this very thing with my nutrition professor throughout the semester. I would constantly comment "I read that (insert controversial information here)..." The timing has to be precise. When you introduce new information in the proper context they are kind of put on the spot. Either they welcome the new information and admit that they don't know everything or they ignore you and suppress input. My professor never directly expanded on any new information I brought into the classroom. She would shift gears and change the subject or make some quip that didn't address my points. My classmates could see that I could get her riled up quite easily and they thought it was hilarious but they were afraid to speak out in class. It was a really repressive anti-intellectual environment in there. My classmates didn't appreciate my constant side remarks but they did really start to enjoy the confidence I brought to the classroom because the professor acted in a very intimidating way.

I say, just float stuff out there, good stuff, when it's relevant.

Like when we were studying the effects of calcium in the body and she was urging dairy as a source of calcium. I stated that I read somewhere that the calcium in dairy is calcium phosphate. When pasteurized, the high temp turns a great deal of calcium into a precipitate which cannot be absorbed by the body.

She responded by accusing me of pushing dangerous raw milk with bacteria.

I said I wasn't pushing raw dairy...I was just stating that if she is looking to get adequate calcium from dairy, she's not. It kind of got personal.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 25, 2011
at 11:09 PM

I agree with everything but the side remarks. Those just piss people off. I know because I did it :)

226b10cbb6b1d3530b00d2d84a2dc86e

(3313)

on June 25, 2011
at 11:16 PM

I'm changing my name to bambambastard :)

2
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 25, 2011
at 09:33 PM

Would a diet high in saturated fat be good for you?

Could a person survive without carbs?

1
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on June 29, 2011
at 06:09 PM

  1. What would be the side-effects of avoiding all grains and grain based products?

  2. What is the iodine status of people who avoid all salt, and are thus avoiding iodized salt, which was iodized by health mandate to improve iodine levels?

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 28, 2011
at 01:06 AM

why do 'they' suggest a carb-based diet for diabetics?

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