1

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How do you think a paleo/ anti-acne fast food drive through restaurant would?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 29, 2012 at 12:38 AM

Lets say a fast food drive in chain begin that only served pure paleo foods.

one of the marketing points would be that the food has anti-acne property, and if people eat there everyday for a month, they'd see improvement in their skin.

of course it was also be marketed to anybody who wanted tasty paleo food for a relatively cheap price.

you'd have a conventional drive through, and also an indoor seating area like most fast food places.

there would be different options for different levels of purity- nightshade free, no fruits, high fat, whatever.

do you think it would be successful?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on October 29, 2012
at 02:08 PM

@JeJ: "Friendly" to something and claiming that eating there for 30 days will give you clearer skin are two different beasts.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:43 PM

It seems difficult to imagine a large chain being able to produce a consist product across the globe by using only "organic, free-range, grass fed, and additives-free ingredients"- food spoilage would go up enormously, consistency would be difficult, availability would be different in each location. But maybe I'm just rooting for the small, local, family-run businesses to fill the niche of quick, health food ;)

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 29, 2012
at 10:22 AM

Not to mention marketing to people with acne will further limit the already tiny target market. This is such a bad idea.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Mm acne food...

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on October 29, 2012
at 02:06 AM

yeah, paleo is one thing, but seeing the word "acne" will kill people's appetites.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 01:48 AM

Opening a restaurant offering food that's "friendly" to something =/= giving "medical" advice. I mean, I don't agree at all that he should be sued, but I doubt a restaurant could run into problems like this very easily.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:41 AM

No, unless you're in California - they seem to go for anything if it's supposed to be for the environment or health.

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8 Answers

5
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 01:55 AM

I think people would find "anti-acne" to be a bit hokey. I know I would. More like "health drive thru food that caters to a variety of dietary needs and restrictions" but with a more swish title. As a person with no acne problems, I would not care about it at all. Even if I had acne, I would be pretty suspicious that this is the only thing this food so-called does. As a person with a handful of intolerances and a preference for high fat foods, it would be more interesting.

A sort of high-quality deli grab-and-go would be cool with an option of some take out items heated. I love the Portuguese (and other ethnic I'm sure) deli's where you can just get a roasted chicken (salt and pepper), slices of plain boiled tongue, potatoes roasted only in olive oil, simple pickled eggs, steamed beets, real saurkraut, etc that are just straight up easy-to-grab things on the way home. Some items with a few more ingredients for heat 'n eat would add a little more value to the food.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 29, 2012
at 10:22 AM

Not to mention marketing to people with acne will further limit the already tiny target market. This is such a bad idea.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on October 29, 2012
at 02:06 AM

yeah, paleo is one thing, but seeing the word "acne" will kill people's appetites.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Mm acne food...

2
Ae79a4cc9f9b155ded65f10ab8395a6d

(229)

on October 29, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Another problem with said restaurant would be a high turn over of food waste. A lot of these fast food places sell food full of preservatives so they can store it longer. Ask your local organic food grocer how much food they waste. That is also what contributes to the high cost of organic produce.

Don't get me wrong. if you opened up a paleo food restaurant in my area, I'd probably be one of your best customers. :)

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on October 29, 2012
at 10:33 AM

I think if you emphasize that it is a HEALTHY fast food, I would not bring up Paleo. Also, if the food does not taste good, people won't come back no matter how healthy it is.

However, this is the future of McDonalds. In 20 years they will be organic, free-range, grass-fed and additives-free. If you can beat them to it while keeping the prices reasonable - more power to you.

Also, make sure that everywhere in the restaurant there is a food philosophy displayed - foods that are HEALTHY, ORGANIC and FREE-RANGE. Foods that are GOOD FOR YOU. I would not go for acne - but I would mention all kinds of health benefits like "clear skin, great eyesight".

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:43 PM

It seems difficult to imagine a large chain being able to produce a consist product across the globe by using only "organic, free-range, grass fed, and additives-free ingredients"- food spoilage would go up enormously, consistency would be difficult, availability would be different in each location. But maybe I'm just rooting for the small, local, family-run businesses to fill the niche of quick, health food ;)

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:45 AM

how expensive would a meal be?

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:42 AM

lol i know id go, anyway

0
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 29, 2012
at 03:51 AM

i don't think you can make medical claims about products that don't have a DIN; at least i know you can't in canada without having Health Canada recognize the claim as being true.
it would all come down to $$ i would wager. if cost was in line, you could get people who eat there to like you on FB and tell all their "friends" how their acne miraculously cleared up.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:44 AM

it would depend on 3 things: a. the taste of the food b. the price c. can you convince people the merits of paleo?

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 29, 2012
at 12:43 AM

I'd be concerned that the state would sue you or threaten to press charges like the guy who was sued for giving paleo advice on his blog, because he wasnt a "Certified dietician."

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 01:48 AM

Opening a restaurant offering food that's "friendly" to something =/= giving "medical" advice. I mean, I don't agree at all that he should be sued, but I doubt a restaurant could run into problems like this very easily.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on October 29, 2012
at 02:08 PM

@JeJ: "Friendly" to something and claiming that eating there for 30 days will give you clearer skin are two different beasts.

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