0

votes

How do I get rid of some blood?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 02, 2013 at 9:14 PM

To make a long story short, I went to Red Cross to give some blood (because I seem to have high iron now), but they wouldn't take me because I lived in Europe. Mad cow insanity and all that...

So I guess I need to find a different way to lose some blood. I've done most medical studies in the area, so I'm kind of running out of options (short of blood-letting myself).

Any creative ideas out there?

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on April 04, 2013
at 08:51 PM

@AG- I am not advocating this solution just offering my knowlege & experience. If I were in the OP's exact situation & didn't have 50 donations in the bank...I'm not sure what I'd do. Maybe do some volunteer work to "pay for" their service and skip dealing with my MD? But I wonder if the OP really needs this procedure done?

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on April 03, 2013
at 10:21 PM

Clever solution, and thank you for unpacking the ethical consequences as well.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on April 03, 2013
at 07:45 PM

That's hilarious ^_^

Medium avatar

(39831)

on April 03, 2013
at 01:13 AM

Most of the concern about iron is probably broscience anyway. I'd wager that unwanted iron deposition in tissues has more to do with too little copper than too much iron. My ferritin was up to 300 recently and I increased my red meat and shellfish intake and it dropped to 220. No blood loss that I'm aware of in that time period. More scare tactics from our illustrious paleocracy.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 03, 2013
at 01:03 AM

I have never heard of an upper range of 155. Typically for men it's 175 or 180 and for women it's 170. Typically doctors won't treat people below 250. You need to get a complete panel to include E, B, and D levels. Unless you are having serious symptoms (i.e. stomach cramping, red skin, massive fatigue or fluid in your lungs), I would not be concerned with a 175.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 03, 2013
at 12:55 AM

I do this as well due to high red blood cell count. But this needs to be done with a doctor's supervision and consistent testing. If you take too much you can put yourself in a bad situation.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on April 03, 2013
at 12:20 AM

It says here that my iron is 175 ug/DL, with a normal range up to 155. The thing is, I haven't gotten a ferritin test. Kind of hard up for money right now, but I will compare the costs of testing vs. phlebotomy. Thanks for all the replies!

532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on April 02, 2013
at 11:48 PM

My sister used to be a phlebotomist, she had a small number of people with hemochromatosis, she called it "getting drained off"

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 02, 2013
at 09:30 PM

please do not start self-treating. Check your iron and red blood cell counts and decide an appropriate action with your doctor.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on April 02, 2013
at 09:17 PM

What is your ferritin level?

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7 Answers

best answer

3
800e726cb5dff569fd8edf604c3e2793

on April 02, 2013
at 09:28 PM

You can ask your doctor: the procedure is called phlebotomy and it's just like donating blood except that the blood is discarded.

The traditional way is leeches :-P

I guess you can also pretend to be an angsty emo and cut yourself, but I don't really recommend that route...

532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on April 02, 2013
at 11:48 PM

My sister used to be a phlebotomist, she had a small number of people with hemochromatosis, she called it "getting drained off"

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 03, 2013
at 12:55 AM

I do this as well due to high red blood cell count. But this needs to be done with a doctor's supervision and consistent testing. If you take too much you can put yourself in a bad situation.

4
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 03, 2013
at 08:00 AM

Rugby? The bumper stickers for the women's rugby team at my college said,"Women's rugby, bleed more than once a month".

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on April 03, 2013
at 07:45 PM

That's hilarious ^_^

1
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on April 03, 2013
at 12:33 AM

A comment / question before an answer... "(because I seem to have high iron now),

And you know this how?

But to answer your question.

A "creative alternative" but of questionable ethics would be to lie on the app but then do a "self rejection" on the donation.

In the process of blood donation, they now ask a notebook worth of questions. Travel, lifestyle, disease, etc.... even after all of this, they give you a set of "sticky" labels. One labels the unit "good to go", the other labels it "dump this stuff".

The reason for this "final selection"... sometimes families or groups donate together and it can be potentially embarrassing for one donor to be publicly screened out, which gives then a personal incentive to withhold disqualifying information. Being screened out can trigger all sorts of personal questions. So the RC goes along with the ruse & let's person "self reject" in private. No harm / no foul & the integrity of the blood supply is maintained.

However you would going into this for your own gain, knowingly wasting RC time & resources . But it???s not like it???s never done for ???other reasons???.

Too bad you hadn???t racked up 50+ donations before Mad Cow. :(

There's always leeches but 16 oz worth? That would take a lot of them & some time. http://www.leeches.biz/leech-therapy.htm

btw...don't even consider any sort of "self-treatment"

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on April 03, 2013
at 10:21 PM

Clever solution, and thank you for unpacking the ethical consequences as well.

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on April 04, 2013
at 08:51 PM

@AG- I am not advocating this solution just offering my knowlege & experience. If I were in the OP's exact situation & didn't have 50 donations in the bank...I'm not sure what I'd do. Maybe do some volunteer work to "pay for" their service and skip dealing with my MD? But I wonder if the OP really needs this procedure done?

0
65f2713401ea5f29d3c19ddaf50a5dd5

(10)

on April 04, 2013
at 12:06 AM

I can't donate either. When I was in high school, I tried to get on the "hero" bandwagon and was denied because I was born in England. As far as I know, they're never letting up on it until they find a way to test for mad cow disease. And that research is behind a long list of other more important things. It sucks as well, because I'm type 0 negative. I'm good for everyone!

But if you're high in Iron and phlebotomy is a common way to reduce it, I can't imagine why a doctor would deny you.

0
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on April 03, 2013
at 07:06 PM

It seems you should be able to find a doctor who will do this for you. I'm pretty sure the health benefits of giving blood are well-known and accepted by mainstream medicine.

0
211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on April 02, 2013
at 11:45 PM

Do not attempt to perform phlebotomy on yourself. You could easily faint and bleed to death.

0
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on April 02, 2013
at 11:07 PM

Vampire Bars, there is one in every major city.

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