2

votes

How did you "discover" paleo? What information source led you to this way of eating?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 25, 2011 at 7:56 PM

Specifically for me: I had heard about protein-sparing modified fat fasts (from the Dr. Atkins book) as I had been Atkins-style low carb for many years. I was searching for information via google on whether there was any new information on the protein-sparing studies in order to determine if it would really "wreck my kidneys" or "give me a heart attack".

While searching, I accidentally stumbled upon a link about the paleo "diet" (might have been "caveman" diet) and also the hyperlipid blog. At the time I was running about 30 miles a week so I went to the Runner's World Forum and looked for threads about running and eating a high fat diet. I posted a comment and a really nice guy who lived in Brazil told me to go to paleonu.com if I wanted to really get healthy. I read all of Dr. Harris's posts and also signed up for Mark's Daily Apple. I played around with paleo for awhile, not really too seriously---mostly just continued Dr. Atkin's style with a little more attention toward eliminating gluten. Then I saw Food Inc and King Corn, and everything just clicked. I bought GCBC, found paleohacks and have never felt better.

What specific web sources, books, movies or people made you change your way of eating?

2422dcf52da053d610d816fe90d93098

(177)

on February 21, 2011
at 03:28 PM

That goes for me too. I read it a while ago, forgot about it, then read it again: http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/diet_and_fitness/article4523487.ece This got me started and has made a massive difference to how I feel. I have read understand the criticism on this site of De Vany's book and am going to read more from Sisson and Wolf.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:14 PM

Yup! And it was so much easier to eat packaged meals; too complicated to make something from scratch and figure out the points! I did lose weight on it when I'd failed at everything else I had tried, but I'm so glad I found a better way.

Bbd50c115fa066bea3ac23a4e82447ff

(558)

on January 26, 2011
at 05:25 AM

It's so heartening to hear about chronic symptoms improving! The fatigue does get better as you get carb adapted and also discover which foods make you feel better.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:57 AM

Absolutely. I also switched from half-n-half to non-dairy creamer (horror of horrors that stuff is capital B Bad for you) thinking I was doing myself a favor, on the advice of the same Dr. who fed me the statins and whole grains BS.

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:48 AM

pretty funny! Whole grains!!!! I think medical/nutritional establishment gives the the worst dietary advice on the planet.

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:41 AM

I would (brainlessly, glassy eyed, exhausted) from the P90X workouts watch Mark drone on about the shakes and I was like 'Who the bleep is this guy and why does he have a mullet?' (I seem to recall he has a large mullet going on in the vidoe.Pretty funny.)

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on January 26, 2011
at 01:59 AM

I never cared to keep watching the weird blonde guy hawking his wares at the end of the videos, and didn't want to shell out cash for their special recovery shakes either. I only later realized it was Mark Sisson who I discovered in a roundabout way on my own (see below).

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:29 AM

If you are interested in economics (and at this point, given the direction of the economy, whom isn't?), Russ Roberts runs a great podcast. I think Russ interviews Nassim Nicholas Taleb (if you don't know who he is---look him up, powerful, powerful mind) and I think Taleb states that he is a follower of DeVany's exercise and diet regime aka he's paleo.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:28 PM

thanks, melissa!

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:14 PM

yes, I remember your posts on PaNu forums and comments :) always very entertaining and informative!

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:12 PM

nice comment from Robb. Also one of the reasons that I kept researching paleo was because althought Mark Sisson has products for sale if you choose to buy, all of the information that you needed was free, as was PaNu--free info is refreshing and somehow seems more trustworthy.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:02 PM

I love that the phrase "no poo" has lead so many people to Paleo, it makes me giggle.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:02 PM

This is my number one problem with WW! It doesn't teach people anything except counting points. Even counting calories is slightly better because you learn more about food and what it has in it reading labels.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:59 PM

I love your story, akd.

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41 Answers

5
C86e08cc801e4fe7545102fd641f79e1

(125)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:16 AM

Obese with severe chronic IBS, I reached the point where I had to do SOMETHING. That same day I found on the Daily Beast an article that reviewed both Gary Taubes' new book and the evolution diet. I knew Taubes was the real deal; I had skimmed GCBC when it was published but couldn't figure out how to put his research into practice. (I had already tried various calorie restriction diets with low/limited carbs and always ended up gaining back all the weight I lost plus another 20 lbs. each time. So I just figured that low carb was impossible for me.)

However, reading about Gary's new book inspired me to try again. The evolution diet mentioned in the article seemed kind of flaky, so I started checking out other low-carb approaches on Amazon. I eventually settled on Robb Wolf's Paleo Solution and have never looked back. Within a few days my IBS symptoms cleared up (after years of misery). I am three weeks in now and loving it, despite the adaptation phase. (Being tired is no big deal compared to always being sick and unable to eat anything.) It is so wonderful to enjoy a meal and feel healthy again!

Although Robb's book was the perfect introduction for a beginner to paleo, my real paleo education came from this site. The first week I had lots of questions about this strange new lifestyle, and all I had to do was search your archives to get the answers (usually several different answers, showing a range of options). I'm so grateful to you all for that support when I wasn't sure what I was doing!

Thanks, everyone!

Bbd50c115fa066bea3ac23a4e82447ff

(558)

on January 26, 2011
at 05:25 AM

It's so heartening to hear about chronic symptoms improving! The fatigue does get better as you get carb adapted and also discover which foods make you feel better.

4
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on January 26, 2011
at 01:58 AM

For me, it was:

gaining weight while wife was pregnant => 100 pushups program => P90x && cholesterol is high => whole grains! => cholesterol not improved => statin trial! => cholesterol better => continue whole grains! => cholesterol bad again! => statin trial again! => WTF? => Google => (eventually) Mark Sisson.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:57 AM

Absolutely. I also switched from half-n-half to non-dairy creamer (horror of horrors that stuff is capital B Bad for you) thinking I was doing myself a favor, on the advice of the same Dr. who fed me the statins and whole grains BS.

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:48 AM

pretty funny! Whole grains!!!! I think medical/nutritional establishment gives the the worst dietary advice on the planet.

3
95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on January 26, 2011
at 08:02 PM

I became frustrated at not losing weight while exercising very hard (weights and cardio), supposedly eating "right", and being put on BP medication. I've always had an interest in anthropology, so I went to amazon.com and typed in paleolithic diet and the first book on the list was Loren Cordain's "The Paleo Diet". I read the description and the reviews and I decided to order it and subsequently devoured the book in a few settings. Since SAD, heart-healthy-whole-grains, low-fat and all of the rest of the standard advice was not working for me, I gave Cordain's plan a try ... and I failed the first two times. I just wasn't vigilant enough and there were other life stresses (PhD qualification exams, wife pregnant, etc.) that I told myself at the time were keeping me from being successful at it. One problem with Cordain's version of the lifestyle was I was hungry too often. He recommends no chicken skin, no bacon, etc.

Starting early in October of 2010, I decided to try again. This time Mark Sisson's "Primal Blueprint" and Robb Wolf's "The Paleo Solution" were bought and read. I still have plenty of stress in life, but I'm managing it differently and I don't let it stop me from truly eating right and treating myself well. This time around, I put much more animal fat in my diet and now I have no hunger problems. Despite all of the "terrible" fat that I eat ;-), I've lost 22 pounds since mid-October, going from 212 to 190 as of today. I have more to lose, but wow do I feel great and my mind is clear and sharp. Goodbye grain opiates and sugar fog. The first 10 pounds came off within 1 month. Following Sisson's and De Vany's advice on exercising has been a revelation too. I love running and then jumping on top of picnic tables at the park while out for sprints. I'll have to be more careful about that when summer comes, lest I upset someone's brie and bread. :-)

As for web sites besides this one, the following, in no particular order, are among my favorites and have been influential and inspirational:

Free The Animal

MovNat

Robb Wolf

Mark's Daily Apple

Cholesterol and Health

Hunt.Gather.Love

PaNu

Hunter-Gatherer

The Healthy Skeptic

Whole Health Source

Livin' La Vida Low Carb

Exuberant Animal

3
82a8b7c6e7f67787c2b16bd595db510e

(253)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:04 PM

I've been reading Krista Scott-Dixon's blog at stumptuous.com for many years. As a woman getting into weightlifting, her advice served me well. One day in November of last year, she posted an interview with Robb Wolf: http://www.stumptuous.com/the-paleo-solution-podcast

I checked out Robb's podcast and on the first one I listened to, he said something to the effect of, "Pending the results of this study, we may have to rethink our position on this."

Wait, did someone selling a diet book just say he'd rethink his position on something if good evidence came along? Maybe he's someone I should pay attention to. And his hard sell is "Try it and see how you feel," seriously?

I felt great. I've been paleo since. Hooray!

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:12 PM

nice comment from Robb. Also one of the reasons that I kept researching paleo was because althought Mark Sisson has products for sale if you choose to buy, all of the information that you needed was free, as was PaNu--free info is refreshing and somehow seems more trustworthy.

3
Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:34 PM

ive always been interested in food politics, and have always avoided highly processed packaged foods. when i was diagnosed with MS three years ago, it was natural for me to start looking at how i could manage my disease with diet, as a compliment to my disease modifying drugs. i gained a lot of weight on my IV solumedrol infusions, and through two pregnancies and as a result of being largely sedentary because of the MS (heat sensitivity and fatigue), and have diabetes in both sides of my fmaily so i really wanted to lose weight, too. i had been reading about dr. weils anti inflammatory diet and the mediterranean diet when a chemist friend of mine (used to work on dairy stuff at the USDA) directed me to weston a. price. i had already thoroughly consumes everything michael pollan had written, and was a member of an awesome meat, egg and veggie CSA. i had done atkins years back but hated how GREASY i felt all the time. my husband is pescatarian, so that made things difficult, too. my friend came to visit and told me about "good calories, bad calories" and we talked a lot about food and inflammation. things just sort of started falling into place for me. it felt like a natural progression. i love science, and i love food. i jumped down the rabbit hole and everything i read just started making more and more sense to me. i sat my husband down and told him taht i was just going to have to start eating more meat, and hoped that didnt bother him. i tried it for 30 days and was hooked. i feel better than i have since maybe my early 20s, but better even than that since i drank and smoked a lot back then. :)

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:59 PM

I love your story, akd.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:28 PM

thanks, melissa!

2
Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on January 28, 2011
at 02:17 PM

Read Arthur De Vany's essay when it first came out. I was a vegan at the time, as were a number of current paleo enthusiasts. I was also interested in evolutionary psychology. When I became overweight a few years later, I eventually tried a LC diet but it didn't work out, maybe because I didn't implement it well. I lost weight predictably eating low, measured calories. But when I reverted to ad lib eating, I gained some of it back. Rinse and repeat. Low calories for a while, get bored, get overweight. All this time, in the back of my head, I kept thinking that evolutionary fitness and nutrition was somehow the key to working this out. The blog Conditioning Research led me to Hyperlipid, PaNu, Whole Health Source, and then the Perfect Health Diet. That put it together for me, and I cut out wheat, excess fructose, and excess n-6, stopped being concerned with eating saturated fat, and started eating starches like sweet potatoes. That led to no more take-out, fewer restaurant meals, much less processed food, less hyper-flavored food (may be important), and lower calorie density in general. Hunger levels dropped, the diet was very palatable, and I was able to cut my energy intake without counting calories. I think that some of what we paleo enthusiasts talk about is far from proven, and that for the most part it is informed speculation. I think we have it mostly right, but wish there was more skepticism in the community. Frankly, it reminds me of how the vegans would talk back in the day. That being said, I believe it would help many people if these ideas became mainstream.

2
F4a256624663a4a459d963fec00fc6cd

on January 28, 2011
at 02:01 PM

I was miserable and uninterested in food. I downloaded a bunch of health podcasts, including Robb Wolf's podcast. I never got to listen to the other ones, the Paleo Solution podcast gave me inspiration and results.

2
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on January 28, 2011
at 01:03 AM

My brother-in-law, a family physician, interjected into an extended family conversation about weight loss, saying, "It's all just silly. Eat only what was available to a cave man, and you WILL lose weight."

He also made a casual mention about leptin/satiation pathways that got my attention (as it was in a conversation referencing my daughter's seemingly bottomless appetite).

Though he is not a paleo eater by a long shot, those two concepts he had discussed stuck in my brain.


Later that month, I started Googling on this concept. Soon I was reading up on Cordain's Paleo concepts, and soon after landed on Mark's Daily Apple. I spent SO. MUCH. TIME. on MDA, read practically every post on my smartphone. I made the leap in late June 2010.

2
Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

on January 28, 2011
at 12:48 AM

Always interested in nutrition. Discovered the Zone, which made no sense but seemed to work, though probably by calorie restriction as much as anything which has various unpleasant side effects, like no energy. My brother introduced me to Atkins, which made somewhat more sense if still not obviously right. Found a low-carb podcast, Jimmy Moore natch, and at some point he interviewed Mark Sisson, and the evolutionary piece fell into place and finally there was an approach I could really have a high degree of confidence was fundamentally sensible. Eating as we are evolved to eat: okay, I get it. Optimal? Maybe. Basically good? Must be. Mark's amazing book clinched it. Thank you Jimmy. And Mark. Since then, Robb Wolf has been a huge source of info, but it's Jimmy and Mark that got me there.

2
0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on January 27, 2011
at 12:57 AM

I discovered Paleo through acne.org. I had known about the diet for quite some time, but I never gave it a chance because it seemed severely restricted at that time, and I was still scared of consuming red meat every day. Oh boy was I wrong.

2
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on January 26, 2011
at 06:53 PM

I'm pretty new to all of this, I'm still not 100% paleo/primal as I am still working in the beer industry, which makes it kind of hard, but doing my best. Oddly enough, I was not looking for a diet or fitness regime, although I am dire need of one. I got a link to Richard Nikoley's Free the Animal blog from one of the other blogs I read regularly. The whole no soap/'poo thing interested me, and while I was reading he kept talking about how this was a part of a much larger way of life that he had been doing. I followed that down the rabbit hole and things just started clicking. I started looking at my own diet, activity levels, lifestyle overall, and things just started making sense. Binge on carbs, feel bloated and gross, yet still somewhat hungry? Check Have the need to exercise a ton, but lack the energy to do so? Check Wild fluctuations in both mood, energy, weight, and overall well-being? Check

I have also been fighting a losing battle with gout for the last few years and I think the weight loss, activity level, and food choices involved with the lifestyle will help greatly. Given the gout issue, I will still avoid things like organ meats, and keep my shellfish intake somewhat low, but otherwise I am really looking forward to taking this journey with all of you.

2
61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on January 26, 2011
at 05:06 PM

I was always skinny (sometimes called too skinny) when I was young. After high school I stopped running cross country and all my bad eating habits caught up with me. After a few years and 20+ extra pounds, I finally decided to do something about it.

I started with the South Beach Diet and from there went to P90X. I never noticed Mark Sisson b/c I also skipped the ads at the end. I didn't pay attention to the diet or supplements with P90X but stayed on a mostly SB diet eating plan.

I loved it, but it took so much time to work out for nearly an hour every day. It started to wear me out. So I eventually stopped doing it and my bad eating habits crept back in. I didn't really lose much weight on the diet or with P90X, maybe 10 pounds, so they both just petered out.

I ended up putting on more weight and reached 190 on my 5'9" frame...I was a muscular 145 in high school and the extra weight devastated me.

I became obsessed with health. I read WebMD all the time and searched for nutrition labels. I started using FitDay and would obsess about how much I was eating. I started reading Health News on google. Anything health, I wanted to know about it.

And then one day I ran across Fitness Spotlight. It made so much sense! I read about real food vs fake food and decided to cut out processed crap from my diet. After that I moved on to Mark's Daily Apple and eventually landed at Panu. I cut out dairy for a while but didn't notice much difference. I've now eliminated wheat and plan to stay wheat free based on what I've read about how it messes people up.

My weight is currently 160. The evidence of Paleo working is so obvious to me, it's no longer just about losing weight, although it is the only thing so far that's allowed me to lose a significant amount. It's about staying off meds and keeping my health at an optimal level.

2
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 26, 2011
at 10:47 AM

I was never really interested in nutrition. I have always been tall and lean, and was healthy.

But I have always been interested in physical activity and health (I'm a physical therapist), in evolutionary biology and psychology and in Africa and african anthropology. So I 'discovered' the hunter-gatherer mismatch theory myself and did research on the internet, especially on the effects of physical activity and musculoskeletal health.

Of course I immediately realised that I was not the only one in the world who made that 'discovery'. And, in 2007 I stumbled upon Art De Vany's text on evolutionary fitness. Because of my background and interests, the premisse of the text made so much sense, it immediately changed my life.

First intelectually, then gradually changing diet and exercise wise, and while reading more and more about it, I changed my diet and lifestyle. And never looked back.

The only 'bad' thing that has changed, is the fact that I discovered the thing called 'blogs'. Although they are great, and I have learned a lot from the paleoblogs, they make me sit more that I sometimes want... ;)

2
Medium avatar

on January 26, 2011
at 04:12 AM

Received daily Lew Rockwell (libertarian) emails that contained articles from freetheanimal.com. The rest is history.

2
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on January 26, 2011
at 02:20 AM

I was trying to eat a healthy diet (read: lots of produce) and maximize nutrient density. I was coming to the conclusion that grains were not very nutrient dense, and no one could give me a good reason to eat them. I googled "grains nutrient density" and found mark sisson. I thought he was a bit hokey, but he piqued my interest and I found Panu.

2
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:46 PM

I did a detox called the CLEAN Program a year ago, partly for weight control and also to see if I had a food sensitivity (before that, I was doing Weight Watchers and didn't really give a crap about nutrition). After discovering my gluten intolerance had been making me miserable for several years, I got really passionate about healthy eating (at that time I was still eating brown rice and quinoa regularly), and that led me to researching fitness also. I found out about Paleo from stumbling upon Crossfit, and thought "well gee, that makes sense!" Watching Food Inc. & reading MDA.com helped inspire me to actually implement what I had learned. I think I had heard of the "Caveman Diet" some years back, but that was back when I was cool with having Totino's Party Pizzas on a daily basis.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:14 PM

Yup! And it was so much easier to eat packaged meals; too complicated to make something from scratch and figure out the points! I did lose weight on it when I'd failed at everything else I had tried, but I'm so glad I found a better way.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:02 PM

This is my number one problem with WW! It doesn't teach people anything except counting points. Even counting calories is slightly better because you learn more about food and what it has in it reading labels.

2
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on January 25, 2011
at 08:32 PM

My trainer came back from a vacation telling me he was now on the "Caveman Diet". I think he found it on some Crossfit sites, I'm not 100% sure what turned him on to it. I always made "healthy" snacks for him and my friends at the gym, so I looked up some recipes. I figured out it was really the Paleo Diet and forwarded him a lot of resources about it, but didn't really read much myself.

I was looking for a new goal because I had made it to my goal weight. \o/ The gym was going to be doing a Paleo Challenge over the holidays, but I was too impatient and started on my own. Because I am a book geek I bought The Primal Blueprint and The Paleo Diet. Honestly, Cordain's book was WAY over my head. When The Paleo Solution came out in September, it was perfect timing for me.

My goal with Paleo was to get my body fat under 25% and I did that the first 10 days. Everything I learned about it while I was researching though, just sucked me in and I'm here to stay. I found Paleo Hacks searching for recipes (one of my very favorite pastimes) and my filter here at work sucks balls and doesn't allow me access to a lot of blogs and message boards. Lucky day for me, Paleo Hacks actually works here, so I can do less work. ;)

You all have taught me even more than the books and podcasts have because being able to ask and answer questions has really led me to think more about all this stuff.

2
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on January 25, 2011
at 08:18 PM

I first heard about it from Art De Vany when he was interviewed on the EconTalk podcast in March 2010. I researched more references online and started in June 2010.

Art also talked about performance-enhancing drugs in baseball in the podcast.

http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2010/03/de_vany_on_ster.html

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:29 AM

If you are interested in economics (and at this point, given the direction of the economy, whom isn't?), Russ Roberts runs a great podcast. I think Russ interviews Nassim Nicholas Taleb (if you don't know who he is---look him up, powerful, powerful mind) and I think Taleb states that he is a follower of DeVany's exercise and diet regime aka he's paleo.

1
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 29, 2011
at 02:36 AM

I first heard of avoiding grains from doctor mercola. Quakish though he may be he was railing against grains way before podcasts and "paleo" per se. From there I felt awesome. Then I heard about WAP and started that, but without the grains. That's essentially paleo. Then some WAP dude mentioned the word paleo and I started reading today's proper paleo crew

1
9909dddc19435db30536612079d309cb

on June 20, 2011
at 10:44 PM

The thing that first turned me on to Paleo was a success story on Steve Kamb's blog NerdFitness.com. Steve had an article written about Paleo that just made sense. I have been on this for about a week and already waking up better, lost the 2PM slow down at work, and starting to see a little more definition on my body. All after a week! I can't wait until a few months from now to see how I'm doing then.

1
90fc4f1e94bab32e4fbab7468e3cecb5

on January 26, 2011
at 09:17 AM

I read Gary Taubes' GOOD CALORIES BAD CALORIES, which changed the way I ate -- as I looked more into some of his ideas, I found Mark Sisson, which is whom I follow...

1
2acab1c60fe533b0c651e36cc9e57a68

on January 26, 2011
at 08:50 AM

My mom's personal trainer at our gym suggested she get on the diet to cure her from hayfever, so she could stop taking claritin once daily for 15 years. I tried it too, and after 8 days I realized I would be on the diet forever.

1
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on January 26, 2011
at 02:55 AM

I was googling "carb cycling" and discovered Mark Sisson's Carbohydrate Curve on his blog, Mark's Dairy Apple. The rest is history. ;)

1
Bbd50c115fa066bea3ac23a4e82447ff

(558)

on January 26, 2011
at 02:51 AM

One day I stumbled across the concept of Shovelglove (sledgehammer) workouts on Everydaysystems.com, which led me to urbanprimalist.com, where Timothy Williams discussed his health and fitness transformation through Shovelglove and the Primal Blueprint. I had always believed in the merits of low carb eating, but Mark Sisson really opened my mind to the importance of avoiding artificial sweeteners (trying, sometimes failing!), soy, etc. And of course, I have loved the more intense and less frequent exercise, freeing my time up for so much more enjoyable things than a daily commute to the gym. From there, I became a fan of Robb Wolf. Throughout the process I have listened to Jimmy Moore and discovered so many interesting commentators and researchers in the area of health, nutrition and fitness.

In my previous career, I was a health and fitness writer, contributing to the zillions of conventional wisdom articles. Folks, I apologize. I am currently reading a book that I recommend all laypeople and health providers read, "Bad Science: Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks," by Ben Goldacre, which is an entertaining (though scary) look at how research is often deliberately misrepresented to persuade consumers.

Now I'm a nurse practitioner. Luckily, I'm not a primary care provider, because I could not in good faith follow the clinical guidelines that govern current clinical practice (ie. must prescribe statins do anyone with "elevated" cholesterol or be liable if they have a heart attack...) At my current office, I'm supposed to counsel pt.'s who are concerned about weight gain, or who are on medications that cause weight gain, to try to control their weight through a low fat diet or exercise! You can bet I don't do that. Depending on level of interest/cognitive or reading ability, I recommend Primal Blueprint, Paleo Solution or Atkns...PB for someone who wants to know what to do but would prefer a lighter read, PS for someone who wants to know why or who has some underlying illness who might benefit from the details of how paleo can help with autoimmune issues, and Atkins for people who will never be convinced about paleo but who could at least benefit from low carb lifestyle.

1
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on January 26, 2011
at 02:39 AM

An interest in science > GNXP > Steve Sailer > Dennis Mangan > Paleo diet

1
560b683d1c103cb2bddd9e86db8126d5

on January 26, 2011
at 02:39 AM

I was browsing through the internet, researching about eggs, whether I should eat the yolk or not, since it contains this and that. Then I got to a channel called Undergroundwellness and there is this wonderful young man named Sean. I listened to many of his lectures. He said something about High Quality Fats, Medium Proteins, Low Carbs, Unlimited Calories and such. I went on to do more research, and discovered this place, decided to try it out.

1
7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:48 AM

Through P90X--I saw Mark Sisson on the DVDs (he's on at the end of a lot of the P90X DVDs) and then someone linked to Mark's web site in the forums there and I went and took a look at MDA.

I thought , "This seems to be crackpot non-sense. WTF, no bread?" (This was around 12/2009 or so). But I kept reading...I continued with a traditional diet and limited results with P90X for another three months and continued to read MDA...finally I said, "ok, ok I'll give it a try." Tried it, about 20-25 lbs fell off of me without a major struggle on my part over the next few months.

Then I actually cut back to "Sisson quantities" of exercise (all the time saying to myself "This can't be right, this can't be right---everyone knows you have to exercise for long periods at moderate to high intensity to lose weight"), short intense resistance bouts with sprint or sprint-type bouts once or twice per week...and another 20 lbs fell off. So I've lost 45 lbs without a lot of battle since going Paleo 3/2010 (In total I've lost about 92 lbs since 12/2008...but what should have been the easiest weight to lose...the first 50 or so lbs, was a lot harder on a traditional diet and exercise regime than by going paleo. I wish II had heard about paleo back in 12/2008.

I still have another 10-20 lbs to lose before I get to a reasonable weight, but if I stayed where I am (172 lbs 5'8", pretty muscular, 15-20% BF) I would probably be ok.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on January 26, 2011
at 01:59 AM

I never cared to keep watching the weird blonde guy hawking his wares at the end of the videos, and didn't want to shell out cash for their special recovery shakes either. I only later realized it was Mark Sisson who I discovered in a roundabout way on my own (see below).

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on January 26, 2011
at 03:41 AM

I would (brainlessly, glassy eyed, exhausted) from the P90X workouts watch Mark drone on about the shakes and I was like 'Who the bleep is this guy and why does he have a mullet?' (I seem to recall he has a large mullet going on in the vidoe.Pretty funny.)

1
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:41 AM

This is roughly the path I took:

Diabetes --> Atkins (then nine years passed) --> Low Carb Forum --> Protein Power, GCBC, Bernstein --> Fat Head --> Jimmy Moore, PaNu, HyperLipid, Free The Animal, Whole Health Source & WAPF --> Mark's Daily Apple, Robb Wolf, Cordain, PaleoHacks and a host of others

1
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on January 26, 2011
at 12:18 AM

Reading Sweet Poison was my first clue something was up. I found sugar incredibly difficult to give up. Somehow I found my way into paleo discussions, and everyone was talking about Good Calories,Bad Calories (published as The Diet Delusion in Australia). So I read that and about half way through the book, the penny dropped. Ahh, this is about insulin! So then I was able to kick the sugar/grains/milk/fruit habit. I haven't lost any weight in nearly three months, but I have a lot more muscle than I've ever had before, and I'm down two belt holes. I think I must have felt a lot fatter than I was, because I was always bloated. Anyway, I would love to lose some weight, I am overweight and do carry a lot of fat.

1
Dbb6872f139877fe1a94aeb471baa7d1

on January 25, 2011
at 10:22 PM

Through a long, long trail.

I was (mis)diagnosed as a type 2 diabetic when I was 26. (I'm actually a type 1.) I wound up on the internet looking for ways to help myself. Wound up practically living on diabetesforums.com (still there!) and found a LOT of info about low-carbing to improve my blood sugar. I didn't listen to most of it, and wound up really really really sick all the time. Not with sugars, but with intestinal stuff. I was POSITIVE I was celiac and even went in for testing. The day after the endoscopy, I went gluten-free and felt way better. But I was told I didn't have celiac, so I stated eating wheat again. Felt worse again.

I eventually found Mark Sisson and PB and am still working on implementing it. But when I follow it to the letter, my sugars are fantastic. So I'm trying :)

1
D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:25 PM

Here's a little map: Weston A Price > Stephan guyenet > Chris Kresser > Perfect Health Diet > Mark Sisson > Robb Wolf > Panu

I think Jimmy Moore also deserves a shout out as does Chris Masterjohn. I still tend towards a conservative Weston A Price nutritional view but for me that really just means being more of a stickler about food sourcing.

1
4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:10 PM

I got here via a bizarre conflation of Life Without Bread by Wolfgang Lutz and good old Stefansson. I drifted around the internet's fringe meat diet sites until I found paleonu, and immediately connected with the skepticism Dr Harris provided. I was already sold on ancestral diets, but hadn't really had the exclusionary theory put into words before. GG Dr. Harris.

Eventually I found this site, and thanks to my blockheaded inability to let a chance to debate pass by, I started posting.

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:14 PM

yes, I remember your posts on PaNu forums and comments :) always very entertaining and informative!

1
Cc08cfbf68fd613629bda89cede81dc8

on January 25, 2011
at 09:05 PM

I've started with the anti cancer book of David Servan-Schreiber, I was then convinced to drop out sugar and processed food. Then I discovered youtube videos of Mark Sisson and Erwan Le Corre. After reading the primal blue print, I was hooked.

1
202e3fa5d3d86aa5633cf3b681b06bed

on January 25, 2011
at 08:59 PM

I found it,by just doing some google searches on how to chain my diet for health. I am not to far into it, but glad that I changed.

1
62482b6c46233690c88915dd43003546

(75)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:57 PM

I stumbled across all this through the no-poo post on Free the Animal, Jan 2010. Wish I could remember exactly how it crossed my screen but my guess is some RSS feed I was subscribed to or a tweet.

Primal/Paleo is the best thing I've ever done and most likely a life-long change.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 25, 2011
at 09:02 PM

I love that the phrase "no poo" has lead so many people to Paleo, it makes me giggle.

1
239c765fa12bf9fa6b7a7bc0686e019d

on January 25, 2011
at 08:47 PM

Brian Appleyard's feature in the Sunday Times about Art De Vany

2422dcf52da053d610d816fe90d93098

(177)

on February 21, 2011
at 03:28 PM

That goes for me too. I read it a while ago, forgot about it, then read it again: http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/diet_and_fitness/article4523487.ece This got me started and has made a massive difference to how I feel. I have read understand the criticism on this site of De Vany's book and am going to read more from Sisson and Wolf.

1
1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

on January 25, 2011
at 08:42 PM

I discovered it on Beyond Vegetarianism years and years ago when I was veg*n and thought it was interesting but wasn't convinced. I didn't really come to it for myself until much later, when I was Googling therapeutic interventions for the spondyloarthropathies and came upon paleo again.

1
3dc69b257dd93737dba454c8c08790f6

on January 25, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Through a friend who lent me his copy of the paleo diet by Loren Cordain. Mark's daily apple and Robb Wolf (blog and book)

1
03d5a967b935e1e8ef202f313467878f

(485)

on January 25, 2011
at 08:15 PM

I was a triathlete and a vegetarian and read Paleo Diet for Athletes. Eventually I dropped the triathlete part, and hence the high carb and lower fat attempt at paleo and now am much leaner and healthier than I was either as a vegetarian (duh) or a triathlete. I still coach triathletes but I am a huge advocate for paleo with all my athletes.

0
6fed41f72e990dbbf8fdd2c4a2ff0144

(0)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:21 AM

My kitten wanted to eat raw primal. So I got a book from the shop on the ideal diet for him. I started to think...

0
38fca13acabddf7b9c54098507e4041a

on October 29, 2011
at 02:08 AM

The Zone diet in the late 90s after many years of being a vegan. Then I read Eat Right For Your Type and instantly recognized myself in the blood type O chapter. I spent the 90s doing trial and error... so definitely know my stuff having eaten various diets the last 25 years. Lot and lots of notes.

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