1

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High Protein Intake

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 03, 2012 at 10:36 PM

I study nutrition and have learnt that protein works with nitrogen in the body, therefore too much protein may lead to too much nitrogen. This can result in liver problems followed by kidney problems. I am wondering what is the debate against what I have learnt here in defence of the paleo diet. I have read the paleo diet book and in it I have read that with exceeding your protein limit you will get nauseous and have diarrhoea but is there a limit that is too high without these symptoms happening in a result of damage to your body. My intake of protein was a lot higher until I learnt about this so my answered question will help my diet a lot. Thank you if I get a response.

Sarah

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on October 04, 2012
at 01:02 AM

Kind of like how the people who warn against too much meat because of the "acid load" and how it will leach calcium out of the bones never seem to rag on grains, which are also acidic upon digestion.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on October 04, 2012
at 01:01 AM

The "too much protein" thing is usually said regarding the buildup of urea (a "nitrogenous waste"). Like BoneBrothFast said, it's not dangerous. In people with *existing* liver and/or kidney problems, handling the nitrogen load can be problematic, but a high level of protein by itself does not *cause* those problems to develop.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on October 04, 2012
at 12:44 AM

Higher protein intake SUPPOSEDLY = heavy kidney load. But this hasn't been shown to be true in people without pre-existing kidney issues.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 03, 2012
at 11:05 PM

what did your study of nutriton reveal? can you link us to the studies that convinced you to lower your in-take of protein? oh and could you also define what you consider to too much protein?

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6 Answers

1
4e620c421082ff577cad45e1f3f0b319

on November 12, 2012
at 12:26 AM

I was mainly just interested on everybody's information and opinion on this since I think it is a very debatable thing when it comes to discussing an ideal diet. The teacher that told me this information didn't actually seem to know that much information on nutrition even though he is a nutrition teacher. When I was 14 my kidneys almost failed so I have always just cautioned myself on this topic. It's safe to say my paleo diet has continued as before with as much protein as I like and I'm feeling better than ever so asides all the debating that went on about protein the paleo diet is the best in the world !! :)

1
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on November 10, 2012
at 04:35 AM

It's nonsense. Until studies show that excess protein causes these issues, there are many other concerns to worry about. This is especially for someone who is very active and continually tearing down muscle tissue. I've been doing 200-350 grams of protein (male, 5'8, 175 and trying to gain even more) for a 10-week cycle and still going. Haven't noticed any acute issues. I've also been supplementing with other things and heavily with Creatine. For massive whole food protein meals, I've supplemented with HCL, even though it's not needed for a typical meal or on a regular basis (not on the high protein). It helps, tremendously.

I've noticed no digestive issues. Normal bowel movements, 2-3 times a day and actually, very routine and comfortable. I've also made sure to stay very hydrated. This is key, both with the Creatine and the excess protein. I do think someone who doesn't stay hydrated may have issues with digestion and cognition. However, I think something as simple as increased fluid intake can mitigate a lot of the overload.

One thing to caution, at least anecdotal. I don't think it's absolutely optimal or ideal to go on a lifetime of excess food intake. Not necessarily protein, but just constant eating and supplementation. It's best done in cycles and again, mitigated by making sure the food quality is as good as possible. If that is done, I see no reason why it can't provide very good results and not cause any health problems.

1
Eb717b3230de17a7c870a0292696e6bc

on October 27, 2012
at 04:12 AM

I made this video to help some people out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5F9rLxPyyI&feature=plcp please give me feedback

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 04, 2012
at 02:47 AM

" This can result in liver problems followed by kidney problems. '

Drinking black tea CAN result in cancer, but it doesnt generally. Whats your evidence that a healthy body cant cope?

1
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on October 04, 2012
at 12:46 AM

There are people who aim to achieve a POSITIVE nitrogen balance (VHP Very High Protein Diets.) Supposedly this puts you into an anabolic state and muscle gaining is extremely easy at this point.

I've never dared to try it though, but there are a number of bodybuilders doing VHP and it seems to have benefits.

So there's one strike against the actual belief that high nitrogen=bad.

1
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on October 03, 2012
at 11:10 PM

"I am wondering what is the debate against what I have learnt here in defence of the paleo diet."

Can you clarify what your question is? I'm not sure I understand what you're saying.

I don't understand what you're stating as factual either, for what it's worth.

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