12

votes

Have you seen the new Paleo Study, June 19th 2011?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 19, 2011 at 4:49 PM

Please examine the new study on Dawn of Agriculture Took Toll On Health Paleo. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615094514.htm

Does anyone know this researcher?

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 20, 2011
at 04:03 AM

Manning addresses this very nicely as well. A big part of his argument is that agriculture was crucial in creating hierarchical systems (with attendant abuses of both people and land). Those societies that managed to avoid the pitfalls also practiced their agriculture differently as you point out. Many tended to be dominantly herders though with a little cultivation on the side. I think this is really interesting stuff!

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 20, 2011
at 03:55 AM

Ooh that looks good! It's low-carb, too. I wonder if they carry it at BevMore!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 11:16 PM

They also make some fantastic Txakoli in the Basque!

446d2dddaeeccb2cc31a09cf20e40d46

(676)

on June 19, 2011
at 06:24 PM

It's a review of all literature available. So yeah, the data is not new obviously... (Quote: "Amanda Mummert led the first comprehensive, global review of the literature regarding stature and health during the agriculture transition")

F3176aa8463fe7f416f4da0d04974c1d

(1392)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:25 PM

No, but thanks for sharing this link!

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5 Answers

6
Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 06:11 PM

I highly recommend this fantastic book: Against The Grain, by Richard Manning. He covers this topic in a lot of depth and from different fields of study. There is excellent history on exactly this topic (I wouldn't be surprised if he discusses Mummert's work - or at least the research that influenced hers). Manning also covers the modern grain and industrial food industries. It's amazing stuff.

The structure is a series of essays, some quite personal - it's not a textbook at all but certainly has enough info in it to be used as one.

One amazing tidbit: in an early essay he discusses the appearance of the early Neolithic (and agricultural) migrations that replaced the Cro-Magnon people in Northern France (think the Cave Paintings of Lascaux). The evidence for this shift is supported in fossil records, in genetics AND in linguistics. And there is one small group of people still living in this region that has genes associated with the Cro-Magnon (that are not common elsewhere) and also a language that has no known roots common with other world languages: The Basque. Pretty cool, eh?

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 20, 2011
at 03:55 AM

Ooh that looks good! It's low-carb, too. I wonder if they carry it at BevMore!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 11:16 PM

They also make some fantastic Txakoli in the Basque!

2
776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

on June 19, 2011
at 11:09 PM

Came to this through the duplicate... for all of our bad mouthing of "agriculture" in general, from the archeological record it seems that certain groups have managed to practice agriculture without grains and without ill effects - an example would be Amazonian and North American Indians. In the book "1491" Charles Mann talks about how the abundance that Europeans found on coming to the Americas was in large part due to tree and animal husbandry practices of the native americans. They planted massive amounts of fruit and nut trees and brambles, as well as using burning techniques to control the size and density of forests. The "untouched" Great Plains may have been an informal game preserve where Indians "grew" and hunted buffalo at replacement rates.

My point is that grain-based agriculture in Sumer and Mesoamerica have been the most studied and the most well known, but there existed agriculture that was NOT reliant on direct grain consumption, that while only practiceable at lower densities, was both nutritious and environmentally sustainable. We don't give early people's enough credit just thinking of them as being untouched Edenic children of the Earth. They changed the earth to suit their desires, just as we do, but for certain peoples the lack of native annual grasses suitable to grain cultivation forced them to go other, better routes.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 20, 2011
at 04:03 AM

Manning addresses this very nicely as well. A big part of his argument is that agriculture was crucial in creating hierarchical systems (with attendant abuses of both people and land). Those societies that managed to avoid the pitfalls also practiced their agriculture differently as you point out. Many tended to be dominantly herders though with a little cultivation on the side. I think this is really interesting stuff!

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:08 PM

This data is not new. We have known this about the Egyptian empire because of the mummy studies done. Many believe this is precisely why the empire fell over time. Good find though and always good to revisit it. Plus one.

446d2dddaeeccb2cc31a09cf20e40d46

(676)

on June 19, 2011
at 06:24 PM

It's a review of all literature available. So yeah, the data is not new obviously... (Quote: "Amanda Mummert led the first comprehensive, global review of the literature regarding stature and health during the agriculture transition")

0
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on December 18, 2011
at 05:22 AM

I was the one that posted the 'duplicate' back in June. By coincidence I happen to read science daily - daily and back in June felt the need to share it here (missed being 1st by 2 hours or so :( ). Im posting this now, because having re-read the article, it is that good that this post should be bumped.

0
C86e7a656410480279b136dd13dea71a

on June 19, 2011
at 05:06 PM

Haven't seen it, but great link. Googled the researcher and didn't come up with much, seems like she's a younger student, but inspiring to see some research in this direction.

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