3

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Grass fed lamb?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 15, 2010 at 4:44 PM

I read somewhere that lamb and goat is pasteured and not grain fed as a general rule. Does anyone know if that is true? I am wondering if I can just buy regular grocery store lamb and goat or sheep milk cheese and feel that I am getting a healthier product. I do buy grass fed beef from a local farmer. Thanks!

80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

(105)

on November 14, 2011
at 02:54 AM

It uses resources, just wild ones. It's "sustainable" because few eat it. If everyone ate it, they would have to start farming it like other meat sources.

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on June 25, 2011
at 02:55 PM

The slaughterhouse where I took my deer to be processed had a small pen full of bison, no grass in sight. A feedlot for bison. The butcher shop that owns them sells the bison meat as health food and until reading this I didn't put 2 and 2 together and realize it's a bunch of crap.

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on June 09, 2011
at 06:12 AM

what was the name of that company? What seasons do you are grass-fed?

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on February 19, 2010
at 08:58 PM

By "pasteured" do you mean "pasteurized" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurization) or "pasture/grass-fed" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasture)?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 19, 2010
at 05:59 AM

That was a great link. Thanks. I found these quotes disappointing: "Consumers in the study showed no preference between grass-fed and grain-fed in terms of tenderness and juiciness, but they preferred the taste of grain-fed bison 6 to 4 over grass-fed." Um, 6 to 4 sounds pretty close to no preference to me. But nonetheless, "Grain finishing is receiving more emphasis because of the North American Bison Cooperative’s requirement (15) that their members place animals on a grain diet 100 days before slaughter."

C150e1706e1299323591da93208e603f

(240)

on February 17, 2010
at 11:50 AM

Thanks Acton. I am yet to make my first batch of tallow.

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 15, 2010
at 11:37 PM

You can learn the flavor by tasting good quality, melted grass-finished tallow. Once you can recognize it, it's a very distinct aroma.

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 15, 2010
at 08:17 PM

"Finishing on pasture or by feeding a grain ration in feedlots are both commonly practiced in the bison industry." http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/bison.html#grass Bison is so lean that it would hardly make a nutritional difference whether or not it is grass-fed.

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6 Answers

2
85386e1e883e78f7760f9cc007037b52

(180)

on February 16, 2010
at 01:31 PM

From one of my favourite books (The River Cottage Meat Book), "Thanks to the sheep's ability to thrive on fairly marginal land, British sheep have not, generally speaking, been subjected to the horrors of intensive farming".

Interestingly, it also goes on to talk about the semi-intensive practise of getting lambs born in time for easter ('sring lamb') by feeding the ewes concentrated feed through the winter so they can make sufficient milk. Early to mid summer is when non-intensively farmed lamb is at its best.

1
71655339a07e7abd26960274d86aaa99

on February 16, 2010
at 01:46 AM

Yes, as a general rule standard lamb will be more 'natural' than standard beef, chicken and pork. Any time you can get a game-type natural meat this is the preferred option. Basically the less popular it is, the better quality it will be (ironic isn't it!)

In Australia we have Kangaroo at the supermarket and it is cheap and not that popular (this is slowly changing though.) The animal lives its life totally wild, and is simply hunted and shot before making its way to your table. Again ironically, not only is this much healthier, it is FAR more sustainable since they take ZERO resources to grow to maturity.

80da9f79e2d79978130925702d4c6092

(105)

on November 14, 2011
at 02:54 AM

It uses resources, just wild ones. It's "sustainable" because few eat it. If everyone ate it, they would have to start farming it like other meat sources.

1
C150e1706e1299323591da93208e603f

on February 15, 2010
at 07:30 PM

Acton, how would you describe this "aroma of grass feed"? I would like to be able to recognize if a meat is grass fed by the taste of it (I live in a country that is not big on traceability).

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 15, 2010
at 11:37 PM

You can learn the flavor by tasting good quality, melted grass-finished tallow. Once you can recognize it, it's a very distinct aroma.

C150e1706e1299323591da93208e603f

(240)

on February 17, 2010
at 11:50 AM

Thanks Acton. I am yet to make my first batch of tallow.

1
6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 15, 2010
at 05:41 PM

In the US, lamb and goat are not fattened up in feedlots, but they are still supplemented with grain. I can detect the aroma of grass feed in lamb meat I buy from the grocery store, but it is just not as strong as the flavor in purely pastured lamb or beef.

0
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on February 15, 2010
at 07:48 PM

Similarly, buffalo is a good choice to insure grass fed and pasture raised meat.

I prefer lamb and beef for this very reason. I can buy them at the mainstream mega-groceries at a good price without having to worry about the conditions they were raised in. Particularly with buffalo, they are still wild animals and don't get cycled through industrial feedlots.

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 15, 2010
at 08:17 PM

"Finishing on pasture or by feeding a grain ration in feedlots are both commonly practiced in the bison industry." http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/bison.html#grass Bison is so lean that it would hardly make a nutritional difference whether or not it is grass-fed.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 19, 2010
at 05:59 AM

That was a great link. Thanks. I found these quotes disappointing: "Consumers in the study showed no preference between grass-fed and grain-fed in terms of tenderness and juiciness, but they preferred the taste of grain-fed bison 6 to 4 over grass-fed." Um, 6 to 4 sounds pretty close to no preference to me. But nonetheless, "Grain finishing is receiving more emphasis because of the North American Bison Cooperative’s requirement (15) that their members place animals on a grain diet 100 days before slaughter."

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on June 25, 2011
at 02:55 PM

The slaughterhouse where I took my deer to be processed had a small pen full of bison, no grass in sight. A feedlot for bison. The butcher shop that owns them sells the bison meat as health food and until reading this I didn't put 2 and 2 together and realize it's a bunch of crap.

0
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on February 15, 2010
at 05:46 PM

I called the company by googling the name on the ground lamb package. They said that the lamb ate grass only in certain seasons but ate grain additionally in other seasons. The lamb is being raised in CA.

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on June 09, 2011
at 06:12 AM

what was the name of that company? What seasons do you are grass-fed?

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