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Getting used to grass fed beef?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 13, 2012 at 5:13 PM

I've been having quite a bit of trouble adjusting to the taste of grass fed beef and wanted to know if anyone had any ideas on what I could try to get used to it. Do you think making soup with half grass fed beef bones and have conventionally raised beef bones would help? I would really appreciate it if someone could help me out on this.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Good tip about the room temperature! I have usually done that with grain fed meat too but I think it makes more of a difference with the grass fed.

F4a6fc9f0b701e12cdf2ad5dadaeb2dd

(360)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:16 AM

Fennel seed always gives meat an amazing sweet flavor

D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on February 13, 2012
at 06:50 PM

1 up'd. I want to see results.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on February 13, 2012
at 05:33 PM

Haha. Love this question. My grass-fed steaks taste like grass. And my wild boar meat tastes like poop. I guess salt and spices should do the trick. I just eat more gelatin, fish and lamb. Ground grass-fed beef taste fine to me too and is cheaper...

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7 Answers

6
Medium avatar

on February 13, 2012
at 06:46 PM

Do a blind taste test, using grass fed and non grass fed, and see if you can tell the difference.

D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on February 13, 2012
at 06:50 PM

1 up'd. I want to see results.

5
2a2da4d6df354c8473706281d61d1850

(430)

on February 13, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Hmmm, I think grass-fed beef is delicious. Perhaps using strong spices like coriander, turmeric, and/or cayenne will help with the transition. Everyday Paleo has a terrific recipe (Puerto Rican Beef) that highlights the spice combination.

F4a6fc9f0b701e12cdf2ad5dadaeb2dd

(360)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:16 AM

Fennel seed always gives meat an amazing sweet flavor

1
03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

on February 13, 2012
at 09:06 PM

It took me a while to get used to grass fed beef as well. The first time I used it, I made marinated kebabs and couldn't even eat them. It had a metallic/bloody taste to it that I really, really hate. I have to wash my hands if I handle metal railings or coins a bunch, I despise even the smell that much.

But a few things helped me come around...

  • Ground beef. Really, I had no problem there from the beginning -- good, fatty ground beef is heaven, especially if you're used to dry lower fat stuff.
  • Not sure how you like your beef, but I find the middle of the road is best for grass fed. Medium-rare to medium/med-well. Rare is worse (imho) with grass fed because it's chewier, and too well done is drier than grain fed.
  • For steaks, try leaner cuts for now. They are milder. At first I basically only liked filets (such a princess, I know), but now they're too bland for me.
  • I came to appreciate it even more with slowwwwww cooked dishes that come out fork-tender. Try steak in chili, or beef stew overnight in the crockpot. Or short ribs, shanks...
  • Also something like a flat iron with a strong marinade cooked to medium works well for my tastebuds, especially slicing it thin across the grain.

I have to admit that I still (kinda) prefer the taste of (some) grain-fed beef, but I stick to grass fed for other reasons.

I still haven't found how to make grass fed work well for things like kebabs or tri-tip. They always end up chewy and with that metallic taste. Open to suggestions for that... but hopefully these tips help.

1
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on February 13, 2012
at 07:21 PM

Since the beef I eat is not USDA-graded (I buy straight from the farm), there is a lot of variance in how the end product tastes. It's also significantly leaner, the fat that is on it tends to be much more gristle, and it is particularly gamey.

It took me awhile to acclimate to it. I also had to adjust how I cooked it. I no longer can sear a steak to "black and blue" (charred outside, raw inside) like I used to, the end product is watery and tough. I have to cook my steaks to medium-rare at a lower temperature to let them break down.

This gamey flavor works well with roasts, when I've shared roasted meats with co-workers they've told me "man, that tastes a lot "beefier" than anything I've ever made!", but my friends that have eaten steaks from my grassfed stores tell me they tasted like metal or blood (mineral-y as Andrew Zimmern would say) and "gamey".

Now, with the exception of my local grocer selling 1lb ribeyes for $6/pound (happens about 3 times a year), I never eat commercial beef. I find the flavor "flat" and "greasy". When I do get a commercial steak, I will fry it in my grassfed tallow so I at least get a little "real meat" flavor in there.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 03, 2013
at 10:48 PM

I find marinating steaks for 24 hours really helps.

I always let my steaks come to room temp before grilling, too. Makes a huge difference in how they grill up. Much better results.

0
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on February 15, 2012
at 08:18 PM

I believe grass-fed beef fat content is lower, therefore, when cooking it tends to dry out fast. (This is because protein cooks faster than fat, which is why dry aged/ well marbled steaks always turn out so delicious.)

Tips:

Use clean cooking fat of choice. Grass-fed tallow, butter, ghee, coconut oil all work.

Use Marinades Buttermilk, Vinegar/alcohols, Salt, Oils, and fresh herbs, overnight can really tenderize meat. Thinly slice it and really massage it in.

When cooking, make sure the meat, regardless of thickness/cut is all at room temperature. If not, what happens is really rare, raw, sort of cold, chewy, tough meat.

Slow cooking and stews are a viable way to avoid dryness. But even then, I still think marination with above techniques will make stew meat even tender-er.

You could even slice larger roasts into like long, lengthwise pieces, and use it like a sushi seaweed wrap, cram cheeses and herbs and spices, roll it up, and bake it low and slow.

Ground it up, combine with fatty pork, and exotic meats, make sausage?

Ground it up, obliterate with spices, make tacos?

Don't be afraid to really add the fat when cooking!

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Good tip about the room temperature! I have usually done that with grain fed meat too but I think it makes more of a difference with the grass fed.

-1
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on February 13, 2012
at 09:24 PM

Make sure you aren't cooking it like conventional beef. The general consensus for grass-fed steaks is that once you go beyond medium-rare, it's overcooked. My taste buds definitely agree.

Here's some good info on this topic: http://www.texasgrassfedbeef.com/id82.htm

Also, less is more when it comes to preparation and/or marinading a steak. I adapted my own version of this process and it has made a huge difference.

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