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Food Intolerance

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 05, 2011 at 8:14 PM

I just got an IgG food intolerance test done and the results came back kind of funny. I have been loving the paleo ways for over half a year now, but wanted to confirm my diet with my natural in tolerances.

What the lab found was for the most part in line with paleo: protein and veggies good, dairy, legumes, and grains bad. However, there were some interesting findings in the mix.

For instance, 3 of my absolute favorite foods are almonds, coconut, and sweet potatoes - all 3 of which I seem to be intolerant too. Moreover, I have low intolerances towards peanuts and Gluten!

I know not much changes with respect to diet but what do you make of these findings?

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(5)

on February 06, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Very interesting stuff. Really making me question whether it was worth it or not. Also making me crave coconut and almonds right now ha

728e6aada5e1a656cf88058e8af3d411

(5)

on February 06, 2011
at 12:50 AM

That was my plan, to not eat anything that come up on the IgG test and then go ahead and challenge particular foods. Thanks for your help

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5 Answers

5
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on February 06, 2011
at 05:51 AM

The thing is, your body will react negatively to any food that escapes into the body without being properly digested first. The more you eat a food, the more likely particles of that food could have snuck through a leaky gut undigested. So the more likely your body has had to make antibodies against that food. If you never ate a food, it would be impossible for you to have antibodies against that food. If you rarely eat a food, you would most likely have few antibodies against that food. Your results are actually totally expected. You would expect that your body would have more antibodies against food you eat more of. And that is exactly what happened.

Now say a lot of food escapes from a very leaky gut. And lets say your immune system becomes overly sensitive due to inflammation, ill health, repeated attacks, lack of vit D, other nutrient imbalances, lack of exercise, stress, lack of sleep, etc. Then you could see how perhaps the immune system might jump the rails and over react to some of these foods that you have a lot of antibodies towards. But just because you have some antibodies does not mean your system has already jumped the rails. It IS true that people often develop allergies to foods they are heavily exposed too, but I suspect that is probably because the rest of their body is out of balance.

In a more natural society, people often eat the same things over and over and over, yet allergies are almost unheard of in naturally living societies. Yet why is it in our society, we come to think of it as normal that intensive exposure can lead to allergies? Strange when you think about it.

5
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 05, 2011
at 10:27 PM

I do not think that screening lots of foods for IgG antibodies is useful for identifying problem foods. Unfortunately there seem to be a growing number of private labs, nautropaths, nutritionists etc who will sell you these tests. A test that tells you that you are intolerant to a random selection of foods is worse than useless.

This information on IgG testing from the Australasian society for clinical immunology and allergy is good.

Comment: IgG antibodies to food are commonly detectable in healthy adult patients and children, independent of the presence of absence of food-related symptoms. There is no credible evidence that measuring IgG antibodies is useful for diagnosing food allergy or intolerance, nor that IgG antibodies cause symptoms. In fact, IgG antibodies reflect exposure to allergen but not the presence of disease.

The exception is that gliadin IgG antibodies are sometimes useful in monitoring adherence to a gluten-free diet patients with histologically confirmed coeliac disease. Otherwise, inappropriate use of food allergy testing (or misinterpretation of results) in patients with inhalant allergy, for example, may lead to inappropriate and unnecessary dietary restrictions, with particular nutritional implications in children.

Despite studies showing the uselessness of this technique, it continues to be promoted in the community, even for diagnosing disorders for which no evidence of immune system involvement exists.

Also this article from a couple of years ago:

Testing for IgG4 against foods is not recommended as a diagnostic tool: EAACI Task Force Report.

The full text is here.

"Serological tests for immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) against foods are persistently promoted for the diagnosis of food-induced hypersensitivity. Since many patients believe that their symptoms are related to food ingestion without diagnostic confirmation of a causal relationship, tests for food-specific IgG4 represent a growing market."

"In contrast to the disputed beliefs, IgG4 against foods indicates that the organism has been repeatedly exposed to food components, recognized as foreign proteins by the immune system. Its presence should not be considered as a factor which induces hypersensitivity, but rather as an indicator for immunological tolerance, linked to the activity of regulatory T cells."

"In conclusion, food-specific IgG4 does not indicate (imminent) food allergy or intolerance, but rather a physiological response of the immune system after exposition to food components. Therefore, testing of IgG4 to foods is considered as irrelevant for the laboratory work-up of food allergy or intolerance and should not be performed in case of food-related complaints."

728e6aada5e1a656cf88058e8af3d411

(5)

on February 06, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Very interesting stuff. Really making me question whether it was worth it or not. Also making me crave coconut and almonds right now ha

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on February 05, 2011
at 11:28 PM

Did you choose to have these tests because something was bothering you, digestion wise or skin issues or something?

The tests are known to have false positives and at best just give you a place to start. The only way to be certain that almonds, etc are not causing X issue, is to remove the foods for a period of time and then carefully challenge them.

This book explains how to do it. http://www.amazon.com/Dealing-Food-Allergies-Practical-Detecting/dp/092352164X

It focuses on food allergies but the same process will work for food intolerances. Allergies are Ige reactions, intolerances are IGg reactions.

Here's a well designed study from last year showing that Igg reactions can cause migraine.

http://ibstreatmentcenter.blogspot.com/2010/06/food-allergy-mediated-by-igg-antibodies.html. This same blog often discusses the role of Igg reactions in some cases of IBS.

Good luck. Would like to hear how this turns out for you.

728e6aada5e1a656cf88058e8af3d411

(5)

on February 06, 2011
at 12:50 AM

That was my plan, to not eat anything that come up on the IgG test and then go ahead and challenge particular foods. Thanks for your help

0
Medium avatar

on February 07, 2011
at 03:34 PM

Be advised that the gluten blood test is only 90% accurate so a negative result is not fail safe.

0
D560066d6ef37ad56e84ac23f1a5d47d

on February 07, 2011
at 03:10 PM

Our son has food allergies as well as intolerances and he eats a mostly whole foods diet as well as taking his Vidazorb probiotic and this has helped him so much! He used to react to foods and had awful eczema but thankfully he is much better.

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