1

votes

Fermenting Vegetables... YAY OR NAY?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 26, 2012 at 12:57 AM

Can someone please explain to me what the deal is with fermented veggies? Everyone tells me I need to be doing this, and if I need to i will... But Why??

The best explanation I've gotten is "it's good for your gut bacteria, but go easy when you start, like maybe a teaspoon a day".

If anyone has more knowledge I'd love it if you would share.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:52 AM

Um, I don't know about sources, but I do it regularly. Except for cabbage for sauerkraut, which doesn't need a brine. I just salt it well, let it rest for fifteen minutes, and then moosh it in the jars. It excretes enough moisture that added water isn't necessary or, in my n=1, beneficial.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:52 AM

Um, I don't know about sources, but I do it regularly. Except for cabbage for sauerkraut, which doesn't need a brine. I just salt it in layers, so that it is well distributed, let it rest for fifteen minutes, and then moosh it in the jars. It excretes enough moisture that added water isn't necessary or, in my n=1, beneficial,

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:51 AM

Um, I don't know about sources, but I do it regularly. Except for cabbage for sauerkraut, which doesn't need a brine. I just salt it well, let it rest for fifteen minutes, and then moosh it in the jars. It excretes enough moisture that added water isn't necessary or, in my n=1, beneficial.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:50 AM

Honey has antibiotic properties. It would not be a good idea to put it in a ferment! It would change the bacterial profile.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:49 AM

Agree. This is a truly dreadful answer.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:48 AM

Did you come here looking for a specific answer?

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:01 AM

Read "The Art of Fermentation" by Sandor Katz if you want to give fermented foods a real shot.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:00 AM

What's the difference between brining and lacto-fermenting? From what I understand, salt brines are part of lacto-fermenting. Any sources?

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 01:56 AM

using salt to create a brine is still lacto-fermenting.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 01:55 AM

Ferments = cancer: some research to back that up please? Anecdotes about "fat WAPFers" is lame. Nothing else but puffy filler in this answer.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 09, 2013
at 01:04 AM

Agree with Dan, this is a lousy answer IMO. Completely focused on a remote possibility that fermented foods have a role in GI cancers (correlative, not necessarily causative).

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 09, 2013
at 12:28 AM

I would have to disagree with this answer. The first two weeks I started eating raw fermented veggies changed my life. I had terrible fatigue up until then, and I suddenly had energy again. Bam. It's been about 5 months and I'm still chowing down on sauerkraut and kim chi, and I would say that the fatigue is still at least 85% gone. Vegetable ferments was more than a necessity. It's very, very good for you, too.

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on January 08, 2013
at 10:26 PM

I believe the cancer connection is only correlational, for example with Koreans.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 26, 2012
at 12:20 PM

actually never mentioned vinegar, brined is referring to salt, at least the way I do it.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 26, 2012
at 06:24 AM

Please do not add honey - Koreans never add honey. Add an apple or a nashi fruit instead of it. It changes the flavor.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on May 26, 2012
at 05:22 AM

To be clear - you can lacto-ferment cabbage and cucumbers - there's no magic vinegar requirement. I've got real sauerkraut in the fridge right now that's never seen a lick of vinegar.

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7 Answers

best answer

-2
153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on May 28, 2012
at 05:52 PM

I really think humans started to ferment stuff from necessity, not because of health benefits, and populations
who eat a lot of ferments have a higher incidence of certain cancers (stomach etc.). I think that some populations have been somewhat healthy despite ferments, not because of them.

Fermented stuff has a a lot of amines, histamine, and I really haven't seen much improvement IRL for people I know who eat a lot of ferments. Also, look at WAPF people for example, unfortunately they are almost never a normal weight, or have radiant health, I think it has a lot to do with the obsession of ferments (maybe the grain thing doesn't help much either with them).

I could be wrong though, this is just something I think right now about health, and ferments. Also, I don't think some kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut etc. would be bad in itself, but some people have gone totally overboard with the whole imaginary thing ferments = health, which is just a theory, not the truth, and have started to take in massive amounts of ferments, thus increasing their cancer risk among other things.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 09, 2013
at 12:28 AM

I would have to disagree with this answer. The first two weeks I started eating raw fermented veggies changed my life. I had terrible fatigue up until then, and I suddenly had energy again. Bam. It's been about 5 months and I'm still chowing down on sauerkraut and kim chi, and I would say that the fatigue is still at least 85% gone. Vegetable ferments was more than a necessity. It's very, very good for you, too.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 01:55 AM

Ferments = cancer: some research to back that up please? Anecdotes about "fat WAPFers" is lame. Nothing else but puffy filler in this answer.

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on January 08, 2013
at 10:26 PM

I believe the cancer connection is only correlational, for example with Koreans.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 09, 2013
at 01:04 AM

Agree with Dan, this is a lousy answer IMO. Completely focused on a remote possibility that fermented foods have a role in GI cancers (correlative, not necessarily causative).

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:49 AM

Agree. This is a truly dreadful answer.

2
8d5dc34c219659afd7bb321745fd1c97

on May 26, 2012
at 02:19 AM

In answer to your question is short and sweet...ready? http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fermented-foods-health/#axzz1vwEQ18Qa

Everything you wanted to know about fermented foods and more. Marks Daily Apple is your source for so much.

We love his Kimchi recipe at home.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 26, 2012
at 06:24 AM

Please do not add honey - Koreans never add honey. Add an apple or a nashi fruit instead of it. It changes the flavor.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:50 AM

Honey has antibiotic properties. It would not be a good idea to put it in a ferment! It would change the bacterial profile.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:01 AM

Read "The Art of Fermentation" by Sandor Katz if you want to give fermented foods a real shot.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:52 AM

Um, I don't know about sources, but I do it regularly. Except for cabbage for sauerkraut, which doesn't need a brine. I just salt it in layers, so that it is well distributed, let it rest for fifteen minutes, and then moosh it in the jars. It excretes enough moisture that added water isn't necessary or, in my n=1, beneficial,

1
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on May 28, 2012
at 02:30 PM

I make my own kombucha, kefir, fermented ginger-carrots, sauerkraut, fermented ginger ale & fermented lemonade. My kids love it all, we never drink soda or fruit juice, in fact my kids turn the stuff down when offered. None of us have digestive issues any more, no more excess gas, we are all regular for bowel movements.

1
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 26, 2012
at 01:28 AM

yes good to repopulate the good bacteria in your gut, however, what they don't often say is it is best to start with very small amounts and work up to it, because can cause digestive distress.

There are some difference between brined veggies (cabbage and pickels) versus lacto fermented.

It is good for you, read up using some of the above vocab, including GAPS fermented vegetables as well. Yogurt, homemade sour cream are also good alternatives including lacto fermented mayo, ketchup and salsa....its limitless really.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on May 26, 2012
at 05:22 AM

To be clear - you can lacto-ferment cabbage and cucumbers - there's no magic vinegar requirement. I've got real sauerkraut in the fridge right now that's never seen a lick of vinegar.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 26, 2012
at 12:20 PM

actually never mentioned vinegar, brined is referring to salt, at least the way I do it.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:00 AM

What's the difference between brining and lacto-fermenting? From what I understand, salt brines are part of lacto-fermenting. Any sources?

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on January 09, 2013
at 01:56 AM

using salt to create a brine is still lacto-fermenting.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:51 AM

Um, I don't know about sources, but I do it regularly. Except for cabbage for sauerkraut, which doesn't need a brine. I just salt it well, let it rest for fifteen minutes, and then moosh it in the jars. It excretes enough moisture that added water isn't necessary or, in my n=1, beneficial.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on January 09, 2013
at 02:52 AM

Um, I don't know about sources, but I do it regularly. Except for cabbage for sauerkraut, which doesn't need a brine. I just salt it well, let it rest for fifteen minutes, and then moosh it in the jars. It excretes enough moisture that added water isn't necessary or, in my n=1, beneficial.

0
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 09, 2013
at 12:31 AM

In addition to the probiotic benefits that other posters are outlining, raw fermented foods contain healthy acids and enzymes that aid in the digestion of protein. I have felt this effect firsthand, and it's quite amazing and clear what difference it makes in the energy I get from a protein-rich meal.

0
Medium avatar

on January 08, 2013
at 07:27 PM

I saw a similar question at www.theprimalplan paleo meal delivery the other day they said "You are right pickles are a great snack. They are flavorful, low-calorie vegetables that is high in vitamin K! Are pickles paleo? The short answer to your question is yes pickles are paleo, fermentation is a natural process. The long answer is some pickles cannot be considered paleo because how they are fermented and ingredients added. Primal Blueprint creator Mark Sisson has stated “Many store-bought brands use vinegar to pickle cucumbers because it guarantees a sour flavor and acts as a preservative. However, this method misses the entire point of pickled food. Using vinegar instead of brine (salt + water) prevents natural fermentation from occurring. Without natural fermentation the live bacteria cultures that turn pickles into a healthy probiotic food are absent. Not to mention that when pickles are soaking in vinegar for a long time it typically results in an overly sour flavor and rather limp texture.” Our recommendation would be to continue eating pickles. If you find that your particular brand of pickle adds non-paleo ingredients maybe experiment with some of the natural brands out there." So the fermentation creates live bacteria cultures into healthy probiotic food The Primal Plan is a paleo meal delivery company in Miami.

0
93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on May 28, 2012
at 02:47 PM

Yes the probiotics created are definitely good for your gut bacteria in that they repair the digestive lining and "ahem" make the system more regular, if you know what I mean. It is actually amazing within a day of eating fermented foods, I can tell a difference. But, to be honest I fermented foods myself and it became a huge hassle. Unless you have a lot of time on your hand and are seriously invested, I wouldn't do it on your own. There are plenty of amazing fermented foods you can purchase that work just as well. When I was fermenting veggies it took 2 weeks and smelled awful (but really tasty!). IF you are looking at brands I now purchase a brand called "Mother-in-Law's Kimchi" it is delicious and does the job well. Sauerkraut is another good option. Kombucha I wouldn't buy in the store because the consistency is completely processed compared to home-made beverages.

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