10

votes

Does it make sense to avoid wheat even though I handle it just fine?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 01, 2012 at 1:04 AM

I've been eating paleo for the past 6 months or so because I've always wanted to be the most healthy version of myself and I think paleo really helped me achieve that. Paleo gave me a good understanding of what it really means to eat "healthy", something I was very confused about before. Seed oils, excess fructose, all make perfect sense to me, but the one thing I'm not totally sold on is wheat, specifically processed wheat bread which is what I use to consume on a daily basis but don't anymore. Every once in a while I'll have some and handle it just fine, but I've been abstaining from it recently because I really wanted to see if avoiding it does give me any benefits, which it didn't seem to. I don't have any reaction to wheat whatsoever, as far as digestion, mood, or energy levels go. So what the average person would say then is, "well go ahead and have wheat bread if you feel fine after consuming it", which would be an easy solution.

What I've learned though, is that there doesn't necessarily have to be a short term symptom for something to be dangerous to our health and that n=1 doesn't really mean anything in the context of health. I think it was Kurt Harris who explained how a smoker will feel great after a cigarette, but down the line that same cigarette that made them feel great will give them lung cancer.

So I guess what I'm asking is,

1. Is wheat something that has been proven to be detrimental to a person's health, specifically in the long term? In what ways specifially does it cause long term problems?

2. It may sound like a crazy question, but in something like store bought wheat bread, has it been so processed that in fact the toxins that are harmful to humans long term (I agree that any wheat bread will be problematic in someone with gluten allergies or celiac) that were originally present in the wheat have been destroyed? That the bread is somewhat benign when compared to crude wheat? During my bread eating days it seemed I almost felt a bit better after consuming the stuff that was more processed than the "whole grain" breads.

I understand that wheat bread is certainly not a nutritious food, I'm aware of that. This question is in the context of someone who doesn't need to worry about weight gain though, and could even benefit from putting a few pounds on, and wheat bread is an extremely convenient source of carbs for me. That's really the only reason I would care at this point to include it in my diet... convenience. If there is in fact reasonable evidence to exclude processed wheat bread from my diet though, I will just keep avoiding it.

Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on March 05, 2013
at 06:26 AM

Italy now has one of the most critically high rates of celiac disease in the entire world. Hmmm...

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 04, 2013
at 11:08 PM

Sounds like you cut out most carbohydrates instead of just substituting something like rice for wheat. The wheat you have in your country may be less dangerous than what we have here. I have no apparent digestive reaction to wheat consumption but my blood sugar is far more stable with rice, and there's a chance that I'm avoiding intestinal permeability, which may occur without obvious GI issues. Something to consider. If what you're doing is working for you and you feel great, keep doing it.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on November 28, 2012
at 04:01 PM

"Grains open up the lining of our guts". Do you know of any evidence for this?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 28, 2012
at 02:09 PM

Up-vote for introducing me to Mat LaLonde.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 25, 2012
at 10:55 AM

Has paleo jumped the shark when people who say they eat paleo eat wheat?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 25, 2012
at 10:53 AM

...Sarcasm fail

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on February 02, 2012
at 07:30 AM

Some people add moderate amounts of foods which aren't considered paleo to their paleo diet and I think that's fine if they can tolerate said food. Individual tolerance varies, and it's possible someone could suffer no ill effects from wheat. Also the amount was not specified–I saw nothing about eating wheat every day. People should be allowed to selectively deviate from the paleo concept. For many it is a framework, not a rule book.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:01 AM

I understand the 20% rule, but let's not get crazy. If someone eats bread everyday since they could tolerate it that would be over the 20% rule.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on February 01, 2012
at 09:46 PM

For many people, paleo is a logical framework and the diet itself forms the baseline from which people can add back so called "non-paleo" foods moderately (often under the 80-20 rule) especially if said foods are not problematic. Saying that eating paleo requires 100% compliance seems extreme and probably turns people off.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:13 PM

I agree you may not be aware of negative effects particularly if you are younger than 30. I always had a stuffy/runny nose but didn't realize that was wheat; I had cranky joints but never thought it might be wheat. Etc., etc. Also, when symptoms become obvious you've probably already suffered some permanent damage.

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:49 PM

From reading the wheat belly blog and doing a bit of side research on pasta wheat varieties, from what I understand, durum and semolina wheats are more heirloomish varieties of wheat that have significantly less gluten (so much less so that you could not make a chewy bread out of them, they would be hard and crusty and not enjoyable as a bread).

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:09 PM

I think sourdough is helpful as it does ferment the wheat but baking kills the fermenting process so there is no probiotic benefit.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:54 PM

If you're going to post an answer at least attempt to answer the question. All you have done is make a comment on everyone elses answer. Next time just post a comment to the answer you want to comment on.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:53 PM

If you're going to post an answer at least attempt to answer the question. All you have done is make a comment on everyone elses answer. Next just post a comment to the answer you want to comment on.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:41 PM

LaLonde is sharp.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:12 AM

One of the things I like on PH is the original thought. Let's not copy and paste reviews without attribution.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 01, 2012
at 04:58 AM

And @Namby, my doctor didn't find any evidence of a battering ram on the colonoscopy. The effect of the wheat was far more obvious: a 42" waistline and diabetes II. For most non-celiacs the big problem with sugars and grains is that they digest so easily, resulting in very pleasurable overeating.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 01, 2012
at 04:40 AM

Let's start with China @Namby. We could then move across every country in the Mideast. People don't eat wheat in the form of Little Debbies, miniwheats and pizza. But they've eaten it for millennia without having the problems Dr. wheat belly sets out to cure. I'm not denying that Americans have an obesity problem, and banning the wheat is one way to deal with it.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 01, 2012
at 04:17 AM

I'm sure vegans can tolerate beef, but what would they be called if they did. Paleo has it's foundation and you know wheat isn't paleo tolerated or not. People on this site crack me up. Stop trying to find ways around things. If maintaining a healthy lifestyle was easy we wouldn't have obesity issues.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on February 01, 2012
at 04:00 AM

Billions of healthy people eat wheat without problems? Where? Name one country where wheat is consumed in mass quantity where obesity isn't an issue. Also, remember that in the U.S., the wheat we eat is the GM'd wheat that aggravates wheat allergies and celiac symptoms. Food allegies really start with wheat: it is the battering ram that breaks open the gut lining and let the other allergens out to the bloodstream.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:33 AM

I forgot miniwheats and raisin bran, my glutton foods. I can't imagine eating flour by the mouthful, but add some sugar and oil and bake at 350 it's a whole different story.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:28 AM

Americans may have invented diet books but they didn't invent wheat. Billions of healthy people eat it without the problems Wheat Belly sets out to cure. The best part of avoiding wheat is keeping one's hands off the beer, cookies and pizza. Which, when you get right to it, is an American problem of gluttony and sloth.

1a68c71d62aa058a86c83c5bb0c28650

(150)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:43 AM

What about phytic acid? Dont' grains ergo bread contain it?

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:34 AM

By the way, you want a convenient source of carbs... what's wrong with mashed potatoes, or when on the run, fruit? Even gas stations sell fruit nowadays. At the office, you could keep pre-baked potatoes wrapped in foil in a gallon-sized ziplock bag in the fridge. You could even make pancakes/muffins/bread with coconut/whatever flours and keep refrigerated.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:28 AM

There's more than just weight loss to fear when eating grains. For me, after I became sensitive to wheat (and other grains, actually): joint pain, brain fog, cravings for sugar/wheat, bloating, diarrhea, bumpy skin, can't breathe through my nose at night, sore inside my mouth, for example. I'm sure you will be OK if you eat it just once in a while, though. I have not tried soaked/sprouted grains to see if they affect me. Perhaps that is the solution for me. When I didn't have a problem (when I lived in Portugal), the grains were properly prepared by my mother, not some factory worker.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:23 AM

You could read "Wheat Belly" by William Davis. It covers the subject pretty exhaustively.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:22 AM

For the first 20-something years of my life, wheat didn't bother me either. Then I got sick. REALLY sick. Keep that in mind. Eat cake when celebrating birthdays, have some cookies for Christmas, etc, like we did back in the days. But don't make it an everyday/weekly thing. If you want to have wheat more than just "once in a blue moon", then look into Weston A. Price soaked/sprouted grains. The book Nourishing Traditions explains how to process grains to make them less dangerous for us. Maybe that will be of interest. Ask your librarian to order it for you if it's not at your library.

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16 Answers

8
627cf3f5d1ddfb4c2f4c96169420f55f

on February 01, 2012
at 02:28 AM

I watched Mat LaLonde's talk at AHS via video. I then watched an interview with him on youtube just a few days ago. He seems like one very smart dude. He takes what he says seriously.

The baseline diet for all humans is meat, veggies and tubers. One needs to experiment from there.

About wheat... he believes that there is a small percentage of the human population that can and will do just fine with wheat without suffering any major side effects. Eating it for every single meal like the government has been recommending is complete nonsense. Would any of us paleo folks eat eggs for every meal every single day? No.

Maybe you are one of the few lucky ones that can handle wheat just fine.

I think its best if you made the decision yourself. I guess realize that its not true that wheat in very small amounts is as detrimental as most paleo folks want you to believe for 100% of the population. Perhaps as much as 99%.

If its convenient for you, you enjoy it and you are certain you suffer no ill effects from consuming wheat then I say eat it. Just not daily.

Cooking does destroy some of the harmful effects. I've always reasoned that bread is better than say whole wheat pasta.

Just my 2 cents. Anyone else?

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:49 PM

From reading the wheat belly blog and doing a bit of side research on pasta wheat varieties, from what I understand, durum and semolina wheats are more heirloomish varieties of wheat that have significantly less gluten (so much less so that you could not make a chewy bread out of them, they would be hard and crusty and not enjoyable as a bread).

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:41 PM

LaLonde is sharp.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 28, 2012
at 02:09 PM

Up-vote for introducing me to Mat LaLonde.

6
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:23 AM

Since several readers have already cited the book Wheat Belly by Dr. William Davis, I felt an added motivation to include a link to Chris Masterjohn's review of that book. I think Masterjohn effectively covers (and debunks) a number of the proposed health detriments of eating wheat mentioned in the book. I'll elaborate on his post and try to answer your first question regarding some of the problems with eating wheat:

-Certainly refined wheat products are nutrient poor and this could contribute to nutrient deficiencies (the likelihood of this goes down when eating whole grain), but if they represent a small addition to your nutrient rich diet this probably isn't a concern.

-Gluten definitely poses a problem to a lot of people, but this is probably more likely to occur in those predisposed by genetics, nutrient deficiencies, and problems with gut bacteria. Even then, digestion of gluten peptides would prevent an immune response responsible for much of the problems of gluten intolerance. If you aren't predisposed and you're able to digest gluten, then you're much more likely to not have problems with gluten.

-As stated in the conclusion of Masterjohn's post, refined wheat products are often bleached or treated with chlorine dioxide or potassium bromide. They're also usually supplemented with synthetic folic acid. I think these chemicals are potentially harmful and worth avoiding.

-Cereal fiber and fructans found in wheat can be problematic, especially to gut health. This could be why you found yourself feeling better on refined wheat products.

-WGA or Wheat Germ Agglutinin is a lectin which may also cause a number of health problems. Though research is limited, I'm very curious about what we continue to learn about WGA and it's effects on health; it may prove to be very a very problematic substance. Due to it's concentration in the germ, this is another possible explanation for your better handling of refined wheat.

Personally, I think if you want to enjoy a some wheat and you feel pretty confident you handle it fine, go for it. If you want to be careful, traditionally prepared and/or fermented wheat will probably be your best bet. And keep in mind that you may not have lifetime immunity; many people develop problems with wheat after never having any prior problems with it.

4
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 01, 2012
at 03:04 AM

Just because you don't feel the effects now doesn't mean your health is not being affected in a negative way.

The gluten, phytic acid and lectins are probably affecting your health.

http://nourishedkitchen.com/against-the-grain-10-reasons-to-give-up-grains/

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:13 PM

I agree you may not be aware of negative effects particularly if you are younger than 30. I always had a stuffy/runny nose but didn't realize that was wheat; I had cranky joints but never thought it might be wheat. Etc., etc. Also, when symptoms become obvious you've probably already suffered some permanent damage.

3
24d67557966cdfc748fc2b12053e6a23

(335)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:06 AM

Dr. William Davis insists that wheat has its own mortality rate, but I cannot find his reference at the moment. Mark Sisson said that after almost a year without wheat, his arthritis disappeared. It's certainly your choice to consume wheat or not, I noticed tons of benefits to not eating it, including IBS symptoms going away, skin rashes disappearing, weight loss, etc. On the other hand, there really is no compelling reason to eat wheat, as most of its benefits are from being fortified, and all the nutrients it contains can be gotten elsewhere.

2
81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 01, 2012
at 01:50 PM

The answer to your main question is NO it doesn't make sense to eat wheat just because you can tolerate it. It's not Paleo in any form. I have yet to find a Paleo site that has said wheat is ok to eat. Eating wheat and saying you're doing Paleo would be like a vegan saying they eat meat and saying they are a vegan. It just wouldn't happen. This is a Paleo site correct? I'm just making sure because I'm starting to get confused with all these non-paleo questions these days.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on February 02, 2012
at 07:30 AM

Some people add moderate amounts of foods which aren't considered paleo to their paleo diet and I think that's fine if they can tolerate said food. Individual tolerance varies, and it's possible someone could suffer no ill effects from wheat. Also the amount was not specified–I saw nothing about eating wheat every day. People should be allowed to selectively deviate from the paleo concept. For many it is a framework, not a rule book.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on February 01, 2012
at 09:46 PM

For many people, paleo is a logical framework and the diet itself forms the baseline from which people can add back so called "non-paleo" foods moderately (often under the 80-20 rule) especially if said foods are not problematic. Saying that eating paleo requires 100% compliance seems extreme and probably turns people off.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:01 AM

I understand the 20% rule, but let's not get crazy. If someone eats bread everyday since they could tolerate it that would be over the 20% rule.

1
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on February 01, 2012
at 01:59 PM

I don't know enough about wheat to wade into this debate - I know it bloats me so that's why I avoid it - HOWEVER, if you do decide to incorporate some into your diet, I'd recommend sourdough since it's a fermented food and possibly that makes it easier to digest and gives you the benefit of probiotics. I know I've seen stuff on this somewhere... maybe someone more educated than me could elaborate.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:09 PM

I think sourdough is helpful as it does ferment the wheat but baking kills the fermenting process so there is no probiotic benefit.

1
A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on February 01, 2012
at 03:59 AM

Wheat doesn't seem to "bother" me either....but I don't eat it for the most part for all the other reasons that it's probably bad for me. Occasionally I will have a piece of bread for an off paleo meal for the sheer fact I enjoy it. Perhaps a celebration, or hot date. I think mental enjoyment of food is just as important as physical...but I don't dig too deep into the whole "is food reward bad or not theories"...I've got better stuff to keep me up at night. I say, and this is just how I function, if it's a tiny portion of what you eat and the rest of your eating is unprocessed and it's ok with you then don't worry about it. Worry makes cortisol and we all know that IS bad. :)

0
Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on March 05, 2013
at 06:24 AM

Eat a bag of flour with a spoon, without additives or enhancements for flavoring. Not so great now is it? Do the same thing with a bag of pure sugar. Kind of hard to do. Mix them together into a cake or cookie, now we're cooking to the real problem here. The rules of First Contact apply. Mingle with it, learn from it, enjoy it when you want to. Just be aware of the possible outcomes when your body does have a reaction to it.

0
F9da0cc90cc121337cff062174fdb678

on March 04, 2013
at 10:58 PM

What about the French or Italians (or Bosnians, which is what I am)? Most Europeans consume bread and/or pasta on a daily basis and have far less cases of obesity than Americans do. Bread is a part of almost every Bosnian meal, I can assure you, and rarely do people discuss extreme forms of dieting, yet they are much slimmer than the average American. I do know that most Europeans (especially the ones who live in large cities) walk a lot throughout the day, rarely eat a huge breakfast (no egg omelets or fruit shakes, but mostly coffee, tea, jam, butter, and toast), eat a big lunch consisting of meat, fresh vegetables, and either bread, rice or pasta, and a fairly small dinner consisting of some leftovers or cheese, smoked meat and, you guessed it, bread! I was in Paris recently and observed how the French women (who are known to be the skinniest in the world) eat...plenty of baguettes, cheese, smoked meat, and a dessert or two. The biggest difference was the portion size. I myself have tried to go Paleo and gave up all the non-paleo foods cold turkey for a week and a half and almost passed out on several occasions, got a migraine almost daily, and was feeling weak and lethargic. At first I thought it was just bc of the fact that "wheat is like cocaine" as everyone claims, and I was going through withdrawl, but when it became so serious that I could not function nor exercise effectively for that matter, I went back to eating beans, bread, pasta, and dairy (but in much smaller amounts than I used to). Why can't I enjoy bread and such but limit my portion size, kind of like we do in Europe? I'm pretty slim myself and exercise 5 days out of the week (intensely!) and I'm just confused why cutting a whole food group is a healthy decision. And yes, I have read the Paleo Solution and find it to be a bit of sale pitch and not really a scientifically backed method of "healthy weight loss."

Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on March 05, 2013
at 06:26 AM

Italy now has one of the most critically high rates of celiac disease in the entire world. Hmmm...

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 04, 2013
at 11:08 PM

Sounds like you cut out most carbohydrates instead of just substituting something like rice for wheat. The wheat you have in your country may be less dangerous than what we have here. I have no apparent digestive reaction to wheat consumption but my blood sugar is far more stable with rice, and there's a chance that I'm avoiding intestinal permeability, which may occur without obvious GI issues. Something to consider. If what you're doing is working for you and you feel great, keep doing it.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 28, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Hey, some people don't have any negative symptoms on cocaine and heroine too, but that doesn't mean it's good for them either.

As usual, everyone's free to decide what they want to do, and if you really want to eat bread, that's between you and your conscience.

As far as I know, I'm either very lucky because when I eat anything with grains in it, even "barley malt extract" that I found in of all things, a "Blueberry" tea, I immediately get negative symptoms such as cold intolerance, acid reflux, and diarrhea. Or, perhaps, I'm not so lucky because I can't "enjoy" what "normal" people eat and so I'm "weird."

But I'd rather know when I eat something that's bad for me than not.

There's two more aspects of wheat/grains to this that relate to immune function. The first is that grains open up the lining of our guts causing leaky gut and, long term various autoimmune diseases from arthritis to even MS. It takes about a month of ZERO exposure to all sources of gluten/gliadin and their analogues from other grains to heal the gut, and in some cases longer. L-Glutamine, gelatin/bone broths can help with this. The second aspect is that it takes something like 6 months of zero exposure to the stuff before our immune system starts to forget its antibodies to gluten, and shuts down the autoimmune damage.

So if you're still exposing yourself to wheat, but have taken out other things, you're not going to heal, and you're not going to see the huge improvements in health, energy, and the removal of brain fog.

There is a reason, beyond just hyperbole, that I mentioned cocaine and heroine. It turns out that grains, especially modern wheat, contain exorphins, that is, compounds similar to morphine which are very addictive. If you're still not convinced, pick up or borrow a copy of Wheat Belly and skip all the personal stories and other fluff but take a look at the negative effects it has, or Paleo Solution and read the chapter on grains.

Your resistance to removing these foods from your diet is probably just a symptom of this addictive property.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on November 28, 2012
at 04:01 PM

"Grains open up the lining of our guts". Do you know of any evidence for this?

0
C2fcd2167c992cb5ff5f15a572978b7c

(0)

on November 27, 2012
at 11:10 PM

It's funny that you mention how wheat makes you feel "better". This could be the byproduct of the addictive properties of gliadin which is found in wheat. The book "wheat belly" is a good source of info.

this article at mark's daily apple dives into the topic as well

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/is-wheat-addictive/#axzz2DT2I28VT

0
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on July 25, 2012
at 12:22 PM

"1." Nothing is proven in nutrition really. Theres anti-nutrients in there that will reduce the nutrients you get and possibly mess with your health in other ways. Its also an acellular carb, which may have implications for gut flora (and the fructans ontop of that):

http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=10339

Its not a food we are evolved to eat, clearly as well.

And the china study found a link between wheat and heart disease (if you like correlation studies). Also with obesity.

If you want a convenient source of carbs, try a peice of fruit. Or some nuts (some are quite high in starch, and thus pretty equivilant starch wise to other sources). They are both pretty convenient.

If you like, of course you can eat bread if you prefer. Its you life!

"2." Crude wheat is inedible. Only birds can eat it.

Processed bread in your supermarket is not free of gunk (like anti-nutrients). Grains need either soaking, or sprouting to remove the anti-nutrients.

In fact theres more gunk, most(all) commercial breads rely on fun stuff like soy, and processed vegetable oils, instead of the older traditional ingredients. Read the packets!

You agreed avoiding vegetable oils seems smart. Just try and find some commercial bread without it in...

Anyway, I agree with one thing: Whole grains are a special nightmare to digest. All that fibre feels like eating a bunch of steel wool. I kinda wonder if all those people who love fibre and wholegrains also scrub their skin with steel wool in the shower sometimes....

0
6473dcb4b0e9b839615d650c168d2747

(638)

on July 25, 2012
at 11:11 AM

Speaking from a completely unscientific place, personally I don't feel as affected by wheat as I do by dairy or sugar — but the fact that it's not nutritionally dense and COULD contribute to health problems like arthritis in the future for me (I'm 25) it's just not worth the risk for me to consume on a regular basis. Also would like to add I'm half Turkish (according to LaLonde the middle east would be the an area where you'd be most likely to find some sort of grain adaptation) but still won't risk it. Prevention is better than a cure, right?

Plus, pasta isn't all that tasty. If it was a matter of steaks I might roll the dice. :)

0
F952feaf817c87735a05b368fa223bd3

on July 25, 2012
at 08:58 AM

Hi I want to know is it dangerous to go on eating grains, oats and cereals. I dont have any side-effects although I am allergic to it.

-1
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on February 01, 2012
at 07:17 AM

wheat contains a lot of starch. starch is basically a string of sugar. its energy dense almost too dense for man to eat without triggering an insulin rush and subsequent glucose crash at every mealtime. next thing you know your on your way to metabolic syndrome. i love bread but i wont be going back unless i have nothing to eat. maybe if we had to grind it between rocks and gather firewood to cook it we wouldn't get fat. at least honey is guarded by bees.grains are just made indigestible in the raw state so we couldn't eat then.

-6
A912ff969107d3eda04ee78c683a6bc5

on February 01, 2012
at 10:28 AM

Don't pay any attention to those people who write fanatical books or the anons on the Internet. Wonder Bread builds fine bodies twelve ways! Do what's right for you! If eating bread turns bad for you, you can always stop. Sounds like it works for you--it makes you feel good and you need carbs.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:53 PM

If you're going to post an answer at least attempt to answer the question. All you have done is make a comment on everyone elses answer. Next just post a comment to the answer you want to comment on.

81cf1892bafcdfa38779f4b9b488198d

(606)

on February 01, 2012
at 02:54 PM

If you're going to post an answer at least attempt to answer the question. All you have done is make a comment on everyone elses answer. Next time just post a comment to the answer you want to comment on.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 25, 2012
at 10:53 AM

...Sarcasm fail

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