5

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Does anyone have a take on raw Paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 23, 2011 at 12:57 PM

I've recently started eating raw eggs and have felt fine.

Anyone know of any books I can read about eating raw paleo with raw meats and so on or if anyone has tried it.

I'm a bit apprehensive obviously with the threat of salmonella, but I'd like to hear some opinions.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I have heard about the 15-day freezing period, and do both depending on where I get the meat. I can offer some anecdotal experience, and that is the fact that never been frozen meat tastes much better and I think I feel better after eating it.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 17, 2012
at 05:09 AM

Labanese eat kibbi neya (raw lamb) and Koreans eat raw beef.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on February 26, 2011
at 02:52 PM

yes, you are correct in your assumption: the spices and herbs help to kill off parasites, etc. Especially chilies and garlic.

C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:02 PM

+1 My sentiments exactly.

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on February 23, 2011
at 04:53 PM

I have to agree here. Cooking enhances the bio-availability of a lot of foods and nutrients and probably has contributed greatly to our development as a species. While there are some foods that are wonderful raw (sashimi and carpaccio - yum) I don't understand the current fascination with eating everything raw. Part of me thinks it might be an offshoot of the whole idea (often unconscious) of certain types of eating as "purer" or more "evolved" than others, but as Stephen-Aegis says, what does raw get you?

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 23, 2011
at 03:04 PM

Also worth mentioning is that besides Europeans who eat tartare, and the Japanese who are known for eating raw fish, Ethiopians eat raw beef in dishes like kitfo, which are heavily seasoned and spicy. I've often wondered if the heavy spices in such dishes act as a sort of temporary preservative as well.

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7 Answers

8
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on February 23, 2011
at 04:25 PM

Eating some things Raw can be great....

but Cooking made us Human. Its no Coincidence that we are the only animal that regularly cooks its food, and the only animal with our brain to body ratio that has dominated the globe.

In addition to making food more bioavailable and calories and nutrients easier to digest, cooking allows some of the antinutrients, lectins, etc to be destroyed or limited when it comes to most vegetables/plants. Meat is another animal :)

Some things are important to have raw for bacteria's sake, hence why fermented foods are so health beneficial, but technically, those are bacterially cooked foods.

Other than potentially Bacteria, what does raw get you thats worth the antinutrient/lectin load being much much higher?

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on February 23, 2011
at 04:53 PM

I have to agree here. Cooking enhances the bio-availability of a lot of foods and nutrients and probably has contributed greatly to our development as a species. While there are some foods that are wonderful raw (sashimi and carpaccio - yum) I don't understand the current fascination with eating everything raw. Part of me thinks it might be an offshoot of the whole idea (often unconscious) of certain types of eating as "purer" or more "evolved" than others, but as Stephen-Aegis says, what does raw get you?

C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:02 PM

+1 My sentiments exactly.

2
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:13 PM

I've eaten 5-8 raw eggs every day for the past 2-3 years. I buy free-range fertile eggs and have never had any problems. My cholesterol is perfect and I feel really good. I also eat about a half-pound of (grass-fed) ground beef or ground bison every day that I would consider 'seared'. Cooked outside but generally pretty cold inside.

'We want to live' by Aajonus Vanderplanitz is a really interesting book about raw foods.

1
2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

on June 04, 2012
at 01:57 PM

3 years of eating raw meats and offal and i feel better each day. i do admit i miss a good char, but i cannot stand the taste, texture or digestive issues cooked meat gives. rawpaleodiet.com

1
Medium avatar

(7073)

on February 23, 2011
at 04:24 PM

If you freeze meat for at least 15 days it is then safe to eat raw, don't know where I heard it, I think from the Weston A. Price site.

I think that you need to look at the traditional meat eaters around the globe, they, as a matter of course will eat raw meat (especially organ meat) along with cooked meat. Liver is absolutely amazing eaten cooked very lightly and raw in the middle, as fresh as possible.

Not sure about any books per se on eating raw paleo, as most raw foodists concentrate on the vegetable side of things.

But I found some good links:

This forum looks active:

http://www.rawpaleoforum.com/

and this is an interesting site:

http://rawpaleodiet.vpinf.com/

with some more links on this page:

http://rawpaleodiet.vpinf.com/links.html.

Or to get straight into the recipes:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_omh5NVW1jAg/TKXXL4z-bkI/AAAAAAAABzQ/H_qUXTgSVfI/s1600/10-raw-meat-recipes.jpg

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I have heard about the 15-day freezing period, and do both depending on where I get the meat. I can offer some anecdotal experience, and that is the fact that never been frozen meat tastes much better and I think I feel better after eating it.

1
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 23, 2011
at 03:46 PM

I lurv carpaccio and have always wanted to try making it at home, and your question has inspired me to give it a try.

1
Medium avatar

(3259)

on February 23, 2011
at 02:57 PM

I don't have an educated opinion about raw, but I like tartare and sashimi. My wife, whose neighbour was a beef farmer, grew up eating handfuls of raw ground beef.

I ran across this TED Talk that I thought was interesting - gets into it a bit.

Check it out.

1
Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 23, 2011
at 01:49 PM

I can't recommend any specific books, but conventional wisdom suggests you only eat meat raw when it is fresh, and not previously frozen. While the freezing process does kill off bacteria, determining the freshness of the meat when it comes frozen is more difficult, and the potential bacterial growth while you wait for the meat to defrost is a possible concern.

For hefty cuts of meat, the concern of salmonella is mitigated by the density of the meat; only the exterior is more prone to contamination. The problem with ground meats is that because of the increased surface area, contamination is more likely.

I'm a big fan of tartare, but if I make it, I ensure it's freshly ground and from a good source. Better yet, buy a meat grinder, and grind your own meat from better cuts of meat.

While it's reasonable to suggest that eating raw meat is fine (our ancestors naturally did), it didn't take long for mankind to discover how to preserve meat; it's simply not practical to only eat fresh kills.

To mitigate health concerns, we eat our red meat rare - the searing takes care of the external threat of contamination, while the inside remains as close to raw as I think is reasonable for general consumption.

Edit: Also worth mentioning is that besides Europeans who eat tartare, and the Japanese who are known for eating raw fish, Ethiopians eat raw beef in dishes like kitfo, which are heavily seasoned and spicy. I've often wondered if the heavy spices in such dishes act as a sort of temporary preservative as well.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 23, 2011
at 03:04 PM

Also worth mentioning is that besides Europeans who eat tartare, and the Japanese who are known for eating raw fish, Ethiopians eat raw beef in dishes like kitfo, which are heavily seasoned and spicy. I've often wondered if the heavy spices in such dishes act as a sort of temporary preservative as well.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on February 26, 2011
at 02:52 PM

yes, you are correct in your assumption: the spices and herbs help to kill off parasites, etc. Especially chilies and garlic.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 17, 2012
at 05:09 AM

Labanese eat kibbi neya (raw lamb) and Koreans eat raw beef.

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