1

votes

decreasing carbs in fermented drinks

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 04, 2011 at 10:12 PM

Hi all, I am making my own kombucha and kefir and was wondering how to decrease the carb content while still maintaining healthy grains/scoby. I'm pretty low carb so I'm kind of afraid to put in enough sugar for them to feed on (even though I know most of it will be gone...right?). Do you all just put in a decent amount of sugar, but ferment it for longer? Won't that convert things to an alcohol carb instead (thus not reducing the carbs by much)? Thanks!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on July 05, 2011
at 03:11 PM

I would do a new feed then wait two day, strain and give it another round. Sometimes they just shut down and go dormant and it can take another round for them to come back. Good luck!

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on July 05, 2011
at 07:17 AM

Thanks for this - I have been leaving my water kefir to ferment until no longer sweet and am concerned that the grains are getting smaller and fewer in number. I shall strin them today, feed again and leave for only two days - I do hope they come back in size and number! I didn't know about the secondary fermentation and shall use this technique now!

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 05, 2011
at 05:03 AM

@Raspberry - I used 6 bags of tea & 1.5C sugar to 3 quarts water, I have found that the stronger the tea and a goodly amount of sugar makes the fermentation proceed very well. After approx 12 days mine is ready, it is tart with a very subtle undertone of sweet.

116d23135449332a8bf9106220cf632b

on July 05, 2011
at 01:51 AM

Josh, what's a good sugar-to-tea ratio.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on July 04, 2011
at 11:15 PM

Economy of words is not one of my strength is it ben, lol?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 04, 2011
at 10:37 PM

People do say that the sugar content goes down but I can't imagine it approaching zero. I'm just going on intuition al definitely disregard me if you find some good science.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 04, 2011
at 10:35 PM

Another thorough one from Sheri

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6 Answers

best answer

4
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on July 04, 2011
at 10:29 PM

I use 1/4 cup sugar to 1 quart of water. That's how I learned to do it. I let it go three days then strain the grains and start a new batch. Meanwhile I let this kefir sit out on the counter for another day or two until it no longer tastes sweet to me. It will continue to ferment (some refer to this as the second ferment) I will usually throw in a lemon at this point. After this second ferment I strain and refrigerate and consider it drinkable.

You must remove the grains after 3 days or you risk killing them because they have nothing left to eat. The kefir will continue to ferment a bit without the grains as long as its left out at room temp. Taste is a good way to tell what's going on. Taste it after removal of the grains then let it sit and day and taste again. Let it go another day then taste it again. You'll see the difference. I am guessing that the carb count for the quart is 5g after second ferment (It's about 10 after the first ferment)

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on July 04, 2011
at 11:15 PM

Economy of words is not one of my strength is it ben, lol?

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on July 05, 2011
at 07:17 AM

Thanks for this - I have been leaving my water kefir to ferment until no longer sweet and am concerned that the grains are getting smaller and fewer in number. I shall strin them today, feed again and leave for only two days - I do hope they come back in size and number! I didn't know about the secondary fermentation and shall use this technique now!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on July 05, 2011
at 03:11 PM

I would do a new feed then wait two day, strain and give it another round. Sometimes they just shut down and go dormant and it can take another round for them to come back. Good luck!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 04, 2011
at 10:35 PM

Another thorough one from Sheri

2
5c8139d7937126906bd9133bb6e10315

on July 04, 2011
at 10:34 PM

Kombucha is relatively low carb because the sugar feeds the scoby. The sugar is gone after the fermentation process. Some companies add more fruit at the end for taste, which adds carbs.

1
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 04, 2011
at 11:12 PM

I make my own kombucha, it takes practice to time the fermentation to a good balance. Mine is very low sugar, does not even blip my glucose meter. Small amount of alcohol is present. Everyone's batch of kombucha will be different depending on time fermented, temperature and ingredients used. Ferment longer for less sugar but it will taste stronger, some people will then dilute it with water before drinking.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 05, 2011
at 05:03 AM

@Raspberry - I used 6 bags of tea & 1.5C sugar to 3 quarts water, I have found that the stronger the tea and a goodly amount of sugar makes the fermentation proceed very well. After approx 12 days mine is ready, it is tart with a very subtle undertone of sweet.

116d23135449332a8bf9106220cf632b

on July 05, 2011
at 01:51 AM

Josh, what's a good sugar-to-tea ratio.

0
980a15ff872265369a76673f214fcc6d

on August 26, 2013
at 02:28 PM

From my reading, the glucose does get eaten up by the bacteria but you are left with fructose.

0
47dc61de0893c5af0f7d757c041adbbe

on June 28, 2013
at 02:37 PM

It is important to realize the difference between sugar and sugar alcohol. Sugar alcohol doesn't digest. If you test the mixture with a ketone strip, you will see a high register. However, if you test your blood sugars afterward, you will likely notice no difference at all. That is the key! Homemade Kombucha batches will vary in the amount of sugar alcohol they contain, but they will all likely be extremely low in carbs (if not zero carb) as far as your blood stream is concerned.

0
763e21b76075617c1ff5736720af224d

on April 20, 2012
at 11:27 PM

When I tested my Kombucha with Diastix to detect glucose they turned the stix to the highest concentration. But the stix are used to measure glucose in the urine of diabetics. If I dilute with water I can get a much lower amt of glucose but some still registers. The question for low carbers is: Will this small amt. trigger insulin release?

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