3

votes

cholesterol medication and when to stop taking it.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 08, 2011 at 4:50 PM

Hi all! I just got my 60 yr old mother to try the paleo diet. She is the picture of American unhealthiness. She developed type Ii diabetes from diet and she has RA and she is taking CRESTOR for her cholesterol. I don't want to advise her to immediately drop the medication. She is going for blood work in 3 weeks. If there are any doctors in the house, when do you think she should drop the CRESTOR? Will it have adverse effects if she is on it while doing Paleo?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 08, 2011
at 06:29 PM

plus one.........

34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on June 08, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Her doctor will likely never recommend she stop taking a statin so that answer is unhelpful. A lifetime of unhealthiness isn't going to be corrected or helped by being on a statin, it doesn't matter how long she's been paleo or even if she's still eating a SAD.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 08, 2011
at 05:14 PM

disagree.......when the drug hurts you to begin with you stop it yesterday.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 08, 2011
at 05:14 PM

immediately......

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6 Answers

4
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 08, 2011
at 06:12 PM

Sounds like you need to find her a low carb friendly doc. Jimmy Moore has compiled a listing by state that he adds to frequently. There are three in NJ.

http://lowcarbdoctors.blogspot.com/

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 08, 2011
at 06:29 PM

plus one.........

3
91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

on June 08, 2011
at 08:25 PM

She should stop taking it yesterday. There is NO evidence that women of ANY age benefit from statin drugs in any way, shape, form or fashion. In fact there is mounting evidence that older women with higher cholesterol live longer.

3
8ebb4a85e8d2c48563b4dd4ac266c8c3

on June 08, 2011
at 05:13 PM

She should stop taking her medication when HER doctor recommends for her to stop taking it. 3 weeks of paleo is not enough to reverse the effects of a lifetime of unhealthiness.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 08, 2011
at 05:14 PM

disagree.......when the drug hurts you to begin with you stop it yesterday.

34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on June 08, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Her doctor will likely never recommend she stop taking a statin so that answer is unhelpful. A lifetime of unhealthiness isn't going to be corrected or helped by being on a statin, it doesn't matter how long she's been paleo or even if she's still eating a SAD.

2
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 08, 2011
at 09:32 PM

And just today, June 8 the FDA is notifying MDs that it is not a good idea to prescribe 80mg simivastin for patients.

How about the FDA just get out of the cholesterol lowering recomendation business.

A new low carb doc for your Mom would very, rarely use a statin...and only in a patient that had a previous cardiac event.

Silver Spring, MD - The Food and Drug Administration is recommending that physicians restrict prescribing high-dose simvastatin (Zocor, Merck) to patients, given an increased risk of muscle damage [1]. The new FDA drug safety communication, issued today, states that physicians should limit using the 80-mg dose unless the patient has already been taking the drug for 12 months and there is no evidence of myopathy.
"Simvastatin 80 mg should not be started in new patients, including patients already taking lower doses of the drug," the agency states.
In addition, the FDA is requesting that additional changes be made to the drug's label. The label will be changed to include the new dosing recommendations, as well as warnings not to use the drug with various medications, including itraconazole (Sporanox, Jannsen Pharmaceutica), ketoconazole (Nizoral by Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical), posaconazole (Noxafil, Merck), erythromycin, clarithromycin, telithromycin (Ketek, Sanofi-Aventis), HIV protease inhibitors, nefazodone, gemfibrozil, cyclosporine, and danazol.
In addition, the 10-mg dose should not be exceeded in patients taking amiodarone, verapamil, and diltiazem, and the 20-mg dose should not be exceeded with amlodipine (Norvasc, Pfizer) and ranolazine (Ranexa, Gilead).
The changes to the label are based on the Study of the Effectiveness of Additional Reductions in Cholesterol and Homocysteine (SEARCH), a study reported by heartwire. In that trial, 52 patients taking the 80-mg dose developed myopathy compared with one patient treated with the 20-mg dose. In addition, 22 patients treated with the high dose of simvastatin developed rhabdomyolysis compared with none treated with the 20-mg dose.
The FDA notes that the risks of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis were highest in the first year and that older age and female sex increased the risks.
In statement released today following the FDA alert [2], Merck notes that it has launched a new information website and is encouraging patients who think the prescribing changes might affect them to speak with their doctors.
Dr Steven Nissen (Cleveland Clinic, OH), who wrote an editorial accompanying the 2004 publication of the A to Z trial, a study that tested high-dose simvastatin in acute coronary syndrome patients, who was critical of the high rate of myopathy in that study, called the FDA decision "appropriate" but said it comes late.
"Most knowledgeable lipid experts stopped administering the 80-mg dosage of simvastatin years ago," he said in an email to heartwire. "Unfortunately, once again the FDA has been too slow to react to a serious drug safety problem. We currently have more than two million Americans taking an unsafe dosage of simvastatin when there are safer alternatives. I'm glad the FDA acted but wish they hadn't taken so long."

0
02736efa3fda31740e8890eed0cb663d

(1813)

on June 09, 2011
at 11:00 PM

I believe there is no evidence that statins reduce the risk of heart disease other than for people who have already had a heart attack, no?

I believe Dr. Harris talks about statins in this podcast: http://thehealthyskeptic.org/the-healthy-skeptic-podcast-episode-6

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