2

votes

Can someone explain this video?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 20, 2011 at 2:52 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSJ_rhJuxYE&feature=channel_video_title

Skip to 1:25 to bypass the nonsense in the beginning. The only thing I'm really wondering is how his blood sugar could have stayed within normal range with a meal that consisted of about 1400 calories of starch and fructose, I'm not interested in the other reasons of why it might not be a great meal or getting into vegan vs meat eater discussion.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 20, 2011
at 02:19 PM

Exactly- he is one hyper dude.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 20, 2011
at 02:02 PM

Travis, I would be interested in reading your bodypart split schedule?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 20, 2011
at 12:34 PM

Ten minutes a day.No one believes me, Travis.... I average about four, with all my neck/back issues. Even four works great. You may be over training! :) Yes the six or seven day split.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:35 AM

There should have possibly been a warning on that link. No one should have to watch Durianrider before 10:00am. ;)

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 07:08 AM

oh yeah, and visceral fat.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 06:56 AM

other nutrients. Lack of sleep, and good quality sleep at that. And there's probably some more. Basically, eat the SAD...your insulin receptors will be sad. Eating nothing but fruit doesn't seem like a great plan for optimal health, but it effectively eliminates junk food, and bananas have lots of magnesium and fibre. So there you have it.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 06:55 AM

Thanks, Melissa :-). Umm, explaining all of what goes into determining insulin sensitivity is a headache and a half. I'm just going to list of chronic inflammation due to many factors, leptin resistance due to chronic inflammation and many factors (lipotoxicity, look eet up), adipose tissue insulin resistance (caused by inflammation I think) which causes the skeletal muscles to downregulate insulin sensitivity. Lack of exercise. Excessive refined fructose (however much that is), trans fats, toxins to the liver including alcohol, bad gut flora, lack of dietary fibre umm lack of magnesium and...

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on December 20, 2011
at 06:29 AM

https://skitch.com/melissamcewen/g1syj/1405197714-westerna.pdf that's from Food and Western Disease by Staffan Lindeberg

74c1777d7d39b053ca64c065dcdb0072

(713)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:22 AM

Yes, but he is an endurance athlete.

102d90f0f32472fdc4256d8d248c5b50

(20)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:18 AM

I really can't agree with this answer, after eating this way for 6 years he posted his blood tests and all the numbers were spot on. (Just for clarification I eat paleo, but am still interested nonetheless)

102d90f0f32472fdc4256d8d248c5b50

(20)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:15 AM

What exactly are the things that both he and paleo's eliminate that cause insulin resistance?

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4 Answers

5
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 03:40 AM

When we consume carbohydrates, insulin is secreted to store them in the cells, it is the "key" to "unlock" the "door" so the glucose can get in. If it can't signal properly due to shortened or damaged insulin receptors (insulin resistance) or there is insufficient glucose transporter activity (another method of getting glucose into the cells, there will be a lot of insulin secreted in a desperate attempt to signal to the cells, eventually the glucose will get in but it takes a while (hyperglycemia) and then you are left with hyperinsulinemia which in this context doesn't get degraded fast enough and keeps blood sugar low for a longer period. He is clearly not insulin-resistant. Neither am I or most people who follow a paleo diet for any length of time if they do it right, it isn't that his diet is anything special, it just eliminates the same things that we recognize to cause insulin resistance.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 06:55 AM

Thanks, Melissa :-). Umm, explaining all of what goes into determining insulin sensitivity is a headache and a half. I'm just going to list of chronic inflammation due to many factors, leptin resistance due to chronic inflammation and many factors (lipotoxicity, look eet up), adipose tissue insulin resistance (caused by inflammation I think) which causes the skeletal muscles to downregulate insulin sensitivity. Lack of exercise. Excessive refined fructose (however much that is), trans fats, toxins to the liver including alcohol, bad gut flora, lack of dietary fibre umm lack of magnesium and...

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 07:08 AM

oh yeah, and visceral fat.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on December 20, 2011
at 06:29 AM

https://skitch.com/melissamcewen/g1syj/1405197714-westerna.pdf that's from Food and Western Disease by Staffan Lindeberg

102d90f0f32472fdc4256d8d248c5b50

(20)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:15 AM

What exactly are the things that both he and paleo's eliminate that cause insulin resistance?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on December 20, 2011
at 06:56 AM

other nutrients. Lack of sleep, and good quality sleep at that. And there's probably some more. Basically, eat the SAD...your insulin receptors will be sad. Eating nothing but fruit doesn't seem like a great plan for optimal health, but it effectively eliminates junk food, and bananas have lots of magnesium and fibre. So there you have it.

2
Medium avatar

on December 20, 2011
at 06:20 AM

Activity level is the primary determinant of glucose tolerance. This is why recreational bodybuilders can tolerate so much starch with no ill-effects while getting progressively leaner. The best thing someone can do to improve glucose tolerance is start lifting weights or do some other high intensity activity like this fellow does. The increase in mitochondrial density and enzymatic adaptations make a massive difference. Most people are really sedentary compared to this guy or people who routinely lift.

Edit: For what it's worth, it doesn't actually take a lot of time per day to greatly increase your own glucose tolerance. Probably the most efficient/sustainable way is with a bodypart split where you divide up your muscle groups into 6-7 days and choose one exercise (can be with bodyweight if you like) per day and do a few sets to momentary failure. Takes less than 10 minutes a day. To be clear, I don't have much muscle nor do I intend to gain a lot (though it is increasingly slowly) however doing this has made a huge difference for the amount of starch and sugar I can tolerate.

Another upside of this is that you greatly decrease your risk for sarcopenia/ostepenia. I really don't consider it to be optional in the least bit.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 20, 2011
at 12:34 PM

Ten minutes a day.No one believes me, Travis.... I average about four, with all my neck/back issues. Even four works great. You may be over training! :) Yes the six or seven day split.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 20, 2011
at 02:02 PM

Travis, I would be interested in reading your bodypart split schedule?

2
0c6822d7f0a97357cdf616a597fdcd8b

on December 20, 2011
at 04:36 AM

The guy is an endurance athlete. I'm a recovering Type-II diabetic and can eat 4-5 Apples after doing a Peak 8 style workout without it screwing up my blood sugar. Get rid of that 3hr hard bike ride everyday and this guys would be falling to pieces, just like the people he has banned from his site.

0
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on December 20, 2011
at 03:38 AM

He didn't wait long enough to test his blood sugar, it takes longer than many people think from the time a fruit is eaten until the blood sugar hit(even blended). 15 Bananas, about 1500 cals, about 400 grams of carbs total, offset by 45 grams or so of fiber, netting out about 350 total grams of a mix of glucose, sucrose, fructose and starch, specifically amylopectin-B. Amylopectin-B resists digestion and fructose in the form of fructose and in the almost 50-50 split in sucrose cause no insulin response(and no blood sugar increase as your testing GLUCOSE NOT FRUCTOSE). A banana has a GI rating of 51, glucose over 71, therefore there is not much glucose, either in the form of free glucose or in the 50-50 sucrose. NONE of the fructose can be used by any cells in your body except your liver (which converts it to dangerous vldl).

30 bananas a day is a GREAT diet if you burn 3000 calories a day for maintaining weight, if your only goal is not to die, and never having to go poo because you are so constipated. It will also elevate your VLDL due to the fructose. It will also limit muscle growth and because of a lack of cholesterol in diet, your body will respond by making some special artery clogging cholestrol to hang out with the VeryLowDensityLipoproteins. You wouldn't dare add in meat to this diet in order to get protein because every gram of fat that comes with the protein will be stored as bodyfat.

102d90f0f32472fdc4256d8d248c5b50

(20)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:18 AM

I really can't agree with this answer, after eating this way for 6 years he posted his blood tests and all the numbers were spot on. (Just for clarification I eat paleo, but am still interested nonetheless)

74c1777d7d39b053ca64c065dcdb0072

(713)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:22 AM

Yes, but he is an endurance athlete.

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