5

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Are your days centered around your meals or are your meals centered around your days?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 20, 2012 at 10:04 PM

How much of what we do in our everyday lives at work, school, home, etc affects how and what we eat?

If your answer is the former (days centered around meals), how much of a factor does this play in whether or not you choose to eat unhealthy foods? Do you find that you need to place this much importance on your meals in order to make the right choices with your food and if you don't think about it enough you end up eating unhealthy things? For those of you who are parents, how do you have a paleo diet and eat only when you're hungry if you have to prepare meals for your kids and spouse at specific times every day? After all eating meals together is a strong way for a family to stay close, but what if you aren't hungry when the rest of your family wants to eat? How does the paleo diet and lifestyle fit into having a strong family life, and do you change your eating habits for your family or ask your family to change their habits for you?

Medium avatar

on January 21, 2012
at 03:42 AM

Yea that's kind of what I was getting at with the question. I'm trying to get a sense of how hard it is to maintain a healthy diet when other things are missing in one's life. Also, how much more likely will a person eat healthier when they have everything they want and need in life emotionally and spiritually? These are things most people don't think about, til they lose everything.

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5 Answers

3
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 21, 2012
at 12:47 AM

I used to have my days centered around my meals, but since trying the 16/8 IF protocol with two meals, my meals are now more fluid, and my day is more grounded and important.

However, I still do think alot about food...not so sure that's good. It may mean that other parts of my life are unpleasurable/unsatisfactory.

Medium avatar

on January 21, 2012
at 03:42 AM

Yea that's kind of what I was getting at with the question. I'm trying to get a sense of how hard it is to maintain a healthy diet when other things are missing in one's life. Also, how much more likely will a person eat healthier when they have everything they want and need in life emotionally and spiritually? These are things most people don't think about, til they lose everything.

3
9255d6163a7114b8392079bfb8fd6151

(216)

on January 20, 2012
at 11:51 PM

i have 2 nearly-teenaged kids and a husband who are defiantly non-paleo. i don't feel tempted to eat their food, cook like i always do for them except remove the bread, rice, beans side from the meal i'm making for myself. they make fun of me sometimes.

i can't ever not think about food. i have to. i have to think about where we can eat out, look at the ingredients of everything, do all the shopping, fix most of the meals.

if i lived alone or with another paleo person it would be one thing, but i'm strongly overruled.

2
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:37 PM

I'm very fortunate in that my 17-yr-old grandson and I both prefer to socialize with each other in ways other than sitting down to eat. We almost never eat at the same time unless we go to a restaurant. Most of our socialization occurs when he is fixing his dinner (so has no earphones or phone at his ear) or we're in the truck gabbing as we go.

As a possibly-recovered binge eater, I've gone from obsessing constantly about food to either not thinking of it at all or looking forward to a healthy meal. It's been very liberating!

If I weren't on my own, I think it would be a complication but less of one now that I've fully acclimated to ancestral foods. For those in relationships, it is one adjustment of many I'm sure. After all, partners have to adjust to different work schedules, health issues and exercise practices not to mention hobbies like fishing, quilting, etc., so why should diet pose a unique difficulty? In my yo-yo days I was married and managed to both lose and gain weight in cycles totally separate from what my husband and son followed--and I was fixing their meals.

2
D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:33 PM

I think this is a good question. I am definitely in a habit of centering my food around my day. At first I thought my day was centered around meals but it isn't the case at all. Eg. I know I'm working out in morning and then going to work. So I plan to eat after workout and bring enough food to keep me satisfied all day. Spend evening cooking dinner when I have time between other activities. I feel like we all can't just eat when we want to, most people would only have an hour or two at night when they have a chance to eat, especially people with families. Just my feelings, I am interested to know if anyone does plan their day around their food?? I don't think its possible.

1
0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:47 PM

I'm retired and my husband does the cooking. I often suggest what we will have and do the clean up. The "Other Woman" in our lives is Julia Child. I used to resent her when I was trying to be low fat and healthy carbs. Now I rejoice in her presence. Hail Julia and all that good butter and other fats! I'm even gracious about greasy pans. So to answer the question, I plan my life around meals, all I want to do is eat well, do yoga and tai chi, spend time with my spouse. Everything else comes a distant second. I do have young people in my life, but since I forgot to have children, I don't feel that I have to/can tell them what to do. It makes me feel good about the world to know they will be taking over. The young are better cooks that most of my peers.

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