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Are there going to be bodily consequences for what I just ate?

Commented on November 16, 2013
Created November 15, 2013 at 7:43 PM

I'm only on day 4 of the paleo diet, and my body has already started the detoxing phase. I'm not doing the 21 day sugar detox, or 30 day challange, I'm just changing my diet in order to drop 10lbs and, hopefully, keep it off.

So, I made a waffle recipe this morning that I found off of a blog, and it called for 1/3 cup of coconut milk and some coconut sugar for the coating. They were very tasty. But after I ate, I noticed that I felt a little bit bloated. And I looked up whether coconut milk or sugar is allowed on the diet, and to my surprise, most said that they aren't "technically paleo" which made me wish I would have done more research before I made them. (lesson learned).

So my question is, is my body going to react negatively to the sugars that I put in my body and start my detoxing process all over again? I might not be doing the 21 day sugar detox, but regardless, my body is definitely feeling the change. So how will this affect me now?

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 16, 2013
at 12:48 AM

No, definitely not about 6 dozen we do either, lol.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 16, 2013
at 12:41 AM

My budget doesn't allow for the two dozen or so eggs I use in recipes each week.

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 11:28 PM

I'll have to watch that later! *bookmarked*

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 10:53 PM

You can buy the fish / coconut fed eggs pretty easily (contact your local Weston Price chapter.) The tropical tradition eggs come out to something like 65 cents an egg. A little pricey, but 4 eggs under $3 is still cheaper than a fast food combo.

They still eat some grains, but the farmers have taken the time to soak, sprout, and ferment the grains before feeding to the hens.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 10:13 PM

If that isn't concerning, this is pretty freaky. The thing is a ticking time bomb.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 15, 2013
at 10:12 PM

Very commendable, indeed. But how many of us have a personal relationship with a chicken rancher?

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:59 PM

That's what you meant by that. That IS concerning.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:56 PM

Lately fukushima is bumming me out about the amount of fresh sockeye salmon I would like to be eating, haha. I could eat the stuff every day if there wasn't a slight concern over metals and radiation.

I suddenly want to fill a swimming pool with tilapia.

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:51 PM

Too bad salmon's so expensive. We do really like it.

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:50 PM

Mmm, sardines in tomato....

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:46 PM

Oh, it is probably the eggs, you're right. And that I eat about 4-6 a day, which at 660 mg a piece is... 2640-3960 mg a day. If my body's absorbing it, obviously. At some point i'd be interested in seeing a study on whether or not going through the chicken helps absorption.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on November 15, 2013
at 09:46 PM

Sardines for the win! Specially the ones in olive oil. Good stuff.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:38 PM

Replace the omega-3 eggs with pastured eggs and look at a 1wk average and you should see a much different ratio. Sardines have the 1/2-1/3 ratio of omega-3 to omega 6 (not quite enough to move your average.) Salmon has a reversed ratio of ~5/1. (I see some reports that say it's even higher.)

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:32 PM

So, yeah. I guess cronometer could be off. Or I've misread. It's just every time I look at it it reads equal or higher.

This reminds me that I need to get another can of sardines.

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:29 PM

I know most Omega-3 eggs aren't ideal when chickens are still not free-range, but it would also make sense that the chicken does the processing for you.

Either way, even if its a 'scam' they're still a buck cheaper a dozen than free range, which I'd rather get but, y'know. That 6 bucks a week. Very important, lol.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:24 PM

Well, not all n-3 eggs are bad. I've known a few farmers to feed their chickens Paleo table scraps, fresh fish, and coconut. (eg)

"In addition to eliminating soy and using organic coconut pulp, our chickens eat a high quality fish meal and crab meal. Our fish meal is from deep ocean water small fish, and our crab meal comes from the cold waters of the Pacific Northwest or Nova Scotia."

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:24 PM

Omega-3 fortified eggs are a marketing scam. Chicken ranchers add flax seed/flax meal to the chicken feed. But humans are lousy at converting vegetarian sources of O-3 fats to the end products the human body uses: DHA and EPA. I think the conversion rate is 10% at best.

I suggest you read Diane Sanfillipo's article on why you should avoid fish-oil supplements before considering the supplementation route for your O-3 needs.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:17 PM

If you eat grass fed meats for your fat / protein, you're going to be at a 1/4 ratio already. Unless you're eating equal amounts or greater of strongly concentrated omega 3, it's not improving much from there. (I don't do fortified eggs.) Olive oil drags you down to a 1/12 ratio. When I eat salmon, I get 1.7g of omega 3 to offset my ratio per 4oz. Tuna is 0.3 and cod is 0.6.

I'm looking at 1wk averages.

I don't think supplementing omega-3 is a good idea, and eating a ton of sockeye salmon right now isn't the best idea either.

Medium avatar

(1097)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:13 PM

Hmmm... I always strive for equal and sometimes exceed my omega 3 over 6 ratio. And... I don't eat any nuts, but do eat omega-3 eggs... only cod or tilapia and tuna for fish. So, that's weird.

Anyway, I don't know if exceeding that is a realistic so much as a 'if you could do this, that'd be fricking awesome' idea, even if usually unattainable.. I realize I didn't explain myself well, sorry about that.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:02 PM

"Equal or higher omega 3" might be pushing it. I think 1/2 to 1/3rd the n-3 as n-6 is a more realistic goal.

I don't eat nuts, eat a ton of salmon, exclusively grass-fed meat, and I barely hit the 1/2-1/3 mark.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 08:14 PM

This is more the direction you want to go, imo. (Check out Sisson also.)

"the diet works out to about 3/4 plant foods, 1/4 animal foods. By calories, it works out to about 600 carb calories, primarily from starches; around 300 protein calories; and fats supply a majority (50-60%) of daily calories."

60a67f6851cba4b7f0817379b7943ff5

(0)

on November 15, 2013
at 08:11 PM

Ok thanks. I'm very new to this and doing my best. I appreciate your honesty.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 08:08 PM

Coconut sugar and almonds are fine, and coconut milk is cool if you can handle it. It's just not what you want to make a staple.. it's like a once a wk - once a month kind of meal. That's like heavy-carbs and anti-nutrients covered in sugar with processed coco milk for breakfast.

Look into animals and vegetables. `Grass-fed` and `organic` are the keywords.

60a67f6851cba4b7f0817379b7943ff5

(0)

on November 15, 2013
at 08:00 PM

Thanks for your answer. Apparently I'm not doing enough research to what is truly paleo. The waffle was made with almond meal and other natural ingredients, but I didn't realize that coconut sugar isn't allowed. The blog I got it from was supposed to be paleo. I guess I'm just confused by what is and isn't allowed.

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3 Answers

0
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:12 PM

Why aren't you doing the 21-day sugar detox? The recipes are all near-paleo or paleo. Level 1 allows a limited amount of white rice and legumes, so you can have some chili w/ beans, for example. I started the Level 1 plan 3 days ago, and because of all the new recipes I needed to cook, I haven't had time to be hungry, aside from the filling nature of the foods.

The only criticism I have is that it bans olive oil for cooking, which makes no sense, apart from extra virgin olive oil. Regular olive oil has a similar smoke point to lard and butter, which are allowed.

0
Medium avatar

on November 15, 2013
at 08:25 PM

So there are a lot of websites out there that try to recreate typical SAD comfort food. When you want a treat every once and a while (and for my family that means once or twice a month maximum) you have an incredible amount of paleo-ified favorites to chose from

That's not what paleo is about, though. It's about maximizing the nutritional value of the vast majority food you put into your mouth. That means you get to eat healthy sh*t all of the time. It doesn't matter if you do low-carb, high-carb, whatever works for you. But the general rules should be followed. I'm assuming you know what those are. Here's the issue with those pancakes in particular.

  1. Almond flour is crazy high in omega-6, thus screwing with your omega 6-3 ratios (humans could strive for equal (and some argue, higher) omega 3) Think of how many almonds are in almond flour vs. how many you could stomach just snackin' 'em raw. Were they grains? No. But higher omega 6 still is thought to cause needless inflammation, which paleo tries to get rid of. So it's not NOT paleo, but it is putting needless stress on the system.
  2. Unless you get straight coconut milk (in a can) it's probably not paleo because those carton milks are full of added sugar and preservatives.
  3. Coconut sugar is still sugar extracted from a coconut. Not tons different than sugar cane extracted sugar. I still consider it not-paleo but it could be worse. This is more a simple-carb battle than anything else, so you decide.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 09:02 PM

"Equal or higher omega 3" might be pushing it. I think 1/2 to 1/3rd the n-3 as n-6 is a more realistic goal.

I don't eat nuts, eat a ton of salmon, exclusively grass-fed meat, and I barely hit the 1/2-1/3 mark.

0
Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 15, 2013
at 07:51 PM

This doesn't come off as being all too serious about the Paleo diet, imo. Day 4 and you're eating waffles and sugar... haha. The guar gum might be messing you up.

At day 4 if you feel bad and you're still eating stuff like waffles and sugar, it's probably more from the sudden change in caloric energy than a herxheimer reaction.

60a67f6851cba4b7f0817379b7943ff5

(0)

on November 15, 2013
at 08:11 PM

Ok thanks. I'm very new to this and doing my best. I appreciate your honesty.

60a67f6851cba4b7f0817379b7943ff5

(0)

on November 15, 2013
at 08:00 PM

Thanks for your answer. Apparently I'm not doing enough research to what is truly paleo. The waffle was made with almond meal and other natural ingredients, but I didn't realize that coconut sugar isn't allowed. The blog I got it from was supposed to be paleo. I guess I'm just confused by what is and isn't allowed.

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