4

votes

Are some foods we eat today "famine foods"?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 04, 2012 at 11:36 PM

Are some of the foods we still eat today actually foods we began to eat during periods of famine and food scarcity, and these foods just became commonplace out of habit?

I'm going to zero in on most vegetables just as an example, because the paleo movement is in such favor of them. To me there are other foods that fit this profile as well (like grains, but these are already shunned here, and rightly so).

I have almost zero craving for most vegetables, when I ate lots of vegetables for long periods of time I didn't notice any positive effects, the only effects I experienced was more gas (even well cooked vegetables). These foods to me, almost seem like last resort foods when there's nothing else to eat. Most of the nutrients in vegetables are not nearly as bioavailable as they are in animal foods and ripe fruits. If you don't believe me, blend up a shake filled with kale, drink it, and tell me what your poop looks like the next day. You will see all that plant matter was hardly digested at all. A half pound of beef liver on the other hand (just as nutritious, if not more nutritious than kale) will be fully and completely digested with no issues. So why do we put these foods on such a high pedestal?

*This is no direct evidence as to what I'm saying but it's always interesting to watch a child eat instinctively. Notice how most children have to be force fed vegetables at the dinner table, while the other easily digestible foods are eaten with pleasure. I think this is a big clue as to what our bodies really need.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 06, 2012
at 07:08 AM

That may be true, but also our goal probably isn't to always eat the best tasting real food that we can get our hands on. E.g., we don't want to just eat honey for every meal. Or, some people prefer the taste of liver to muscle meat or vice versa, but both are ideally part of a healthy diet.

56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

(576)

on November 06, 2012
at 02:24 AM

Compared to most good tasting foods that I can think of in the world raw broccoli comes in very very low on my list. It could just come down to taste preferences I guess.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:03 PM

My 3 year old loves raw brocolli. She bites the top off and leaves the stem.

153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:03 AM

Broccoli is actually really good raw, as are other cabbages, many children only eat raw cabbage because it's only way it tastes good to them. I used to "steal" raw cauliflower and white cabbage from the fridge as a child (I wasn't allowed to have it raw). My stomach does not love raw cabbage anymore, but it still tastes good to me.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 05, 2012
at 09:12 AM

the first time I ade tuna is was on white bread toast. Couldn't do it otherwise. Now when necessity strikes and I feel like it, a tuna tomato and basil salid hits the spot nicely :) Anyway, I agree that 'hardwiring' is in part relevant ('supertasting' etc), but not totally. Environmental factors are huge

56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

(576)

on November 05, 2012
at 02:20 AM

Compared to a mango though, which takes zero preparation and is arguably an incredible tasting food in its natural state, how does that compare to broccoli in its natural state. Sure broccoli can taste OK with a lot of butter and salt, but you're enjoying the butter and salt, not really the broccoli.

56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

(576)

on November 05, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Compared to a mango though, which takes zero preparation and is arguably an incredible tasting food in its natural state, how does that compare to broccoli in its natural state. Sure broccoli can taste OK with a lot of butter and salt, but your enjoying the butter and salt, not really the broccoli.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:46 AM

Yes - this. Green beans is a great example. The green beans I grew up with as a kid (e.g., school cafeteria) are completely different from the green beans I eat today (i.e., fresh and lightly sauteed in butter).

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:33 AM

Because they're usually not prepared in an appetizing way. My mom can't cook vegetables for squat, and neither could her mother. So I rarely had them as a kid and when I did, they sucked. But I make 'em tasty because I've learned how to actually cook.

D9247efab707604457569c9209d75498

(30)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:22 AM

While I agree something like asparagus tastes good with a meal, it's only after I salted and buttered it really well, which I think is me just reacting to the taste of the salt and butter on something with a more "neutral" taste.

D9247efab707604457569c9209d75498

(30)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:11 AM

I see what you're saying, but why the big stigma around vegetables in the first place then?

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2 Answers

2
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 04, 2012
at 11:46 PM

Not answering your question, but I think a big reason why many children have to be force fed vegetables is because they are reacting to the adult who is feeding them the vegetables. If the adult doesn't like vegetables himself or assumes the child won't like them, often the child will pick up on those cues. My 9 month old self feeds and she happily eats vegetables (and fruits, meat, eggs, etc).

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:46 AM

Yes - this. Green beans is a great example. The green beans I grew up with as a kid (e.g., school cafeteria) are completely different from the green beans I eat today (i.e., fresh and lightly sauteed in butter).

56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

(576)

on November 05, 2012
at 02:20 AM

Compared to a mango though, which takes zero preparation and is arguably an incredible tasting food in its natural state, how does that compare to broccoli in its natural state. Sure broccoli can taste OK with a lot of butter and salt, but you're enjoying the butter and salt, not really the broccoli.

D9247efab707604457569c9209d75498

(30)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:11 AM

I see what you're saying, but why the big stigma around vegetables in the first place then?

56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

(576)

on November 06, 2012
at 02:24 AM

Compared to most good tasting foods that I can think of in the world raw broccoli comes in very very low on my list. It could just come down to taste preferences I guess.

56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

(576)

on November 05, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Compared to a mango though, which takes zero preparation and is arguably an incredible tasting food in its natural state, how does that compare to broccoli in its natural state. Sure broccoli can taste OK with a lot of butter and salt, but your enjoying the butter and salt, not really the broccoli.

153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:03 AM

Broccoli is actually really good raw, as are other cabbages, many children only eat raw cabbage because it's only way it tastes good to them. I used to "steal" raw cauliflower and white cabbage from the fridge as a child (I wasn't allowed to have it raw). My stomach does not love raw cabbage anymore, but it still tastes good to me.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:03 PM

My 3 year old loves raw brocolli. She bites the top off and leaves the stem.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:33 AM

Because they're usually not prepared in an appetizing way. My mom can't cook vegetables for squat, and neither could her mother. So I rarely had them as a kid and when I did, they sucked. But I make 'em tasty because I've learned how to actually cook.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 06, 2012
at 07:08 AM

That may be true, but also our goal probably isn't to always eat the best tasting real food that we can get our hands on. E.g., we don't want to just eat honey for every meal. Or, some people prefer the taste of liver to muscle meat or vice versa, but both are ideally part of a healthy diet.

0
153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on November 04, 2012
at 11:45 PM

I'm not so big on veggies, as in, I don't think they are necessarily needed, but I do love veggies, I've always loved the taste of veggies, even as a small child.

I think that people are wired differently, some people love the taste of veggies for example, and some love meat, and animal fat, which in turn tastes like piss, and *hit to some. There was a study about this recently, that some people do taste pork for example as vile.

Whenever I eat meat, especially cooked meat, all I taste and smell is feces, and piss, but I love all veggie foods, they taste absolutely delicious to me.

And funny enough my body is telling me something with this since as a histadelic I cannot tolerate cooked meat much, maybe it's the same for others as well? Some do well with meat and love the taste of it, others not so much etc?

D9247efab707604457569c9209d75498

(30)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:22 AM

While I agree something like asparagus tastes good with a meal, it's only after I salted and buttered it really well, which I think is me just reacting to the taste of the salt and butter on something with a more "neutral" taste.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 05, 2012
at 09:12 AM

the first time I ade tuna is was on white bread toast. Couldn't do it otherwise. Now when necessity strikes and I feel like it, a tuna tomato and basil salid hits the spot nicely :) Anyway, I agree that 'hardwiring' is in part relevant ('supertasting' etc), but not totally. Environmental factors are huge

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