4

votes

are shortening of telomeres and cardiac damage among paleo triathlete(ironman)?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 17, 2011 at 4:50 AM

I really love feeling of zone in triathlon. On the other hand, there are chronic fatigue, shortening of telomeres, overtraining as emphasized in "Top Ten Reasons Not to Run Marathons" by Arthur De Vany.

Message from my prefrontal cortex with reward/risk analysis tells me stay away from triathlon, but my passion(reminiscence of dopamine from previous experience) drives me toward triathlon. Before plunging into reckless risky behaviour, I want to study whether "Is there a possibility that cardiac damage, spine degeneration, brain damage are result of carbohydrate glycation? not from triathlon itself.

Question is: "Are there studies of these bad effects in paleo practitioner with proper training involved in triathlon ironman"?

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:29 AM

This is different from high intensity interval training where there is ample chance for Na/K active pump restores its original equilibrium ratio. We try to live happy life by optimizing our body/brain hardware which are products of evolutions. If end results of evolution have limitations in restoring equiilibrium concentration of Na/K in atrial cells, I should enjoy other activities consistent with physiological optimum condition of evolution and I would be foolish to push against nature's limitations in design of pace maker in heart. Thanks, The Quilt ingyukoh

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:28 AM

The Quilt, thanks for reference which I studied with great interests. After reading this article, I conjecture that Na/K ratio in atrial cells deviates significantly from equilibrium value in endurance exercise due to insufficient opportunity for Na/K active pump to restore Na/K equilibrium concentration. If this hypothesis is correct, then even strict paleo athlete without any glycation complications should experience Na/K inequilibrium from continued endurance exercise.

3a567c1637db69f1455ce35e78201a2c

(1054)

on December 18, 2011
at 04:45 AM

It means if you bet your telomeres by training to max performance in moderate doses, you are going to lose. Do what shah78 says without the teentsey-weenseyiest triathion. Be happy doing high intensity endurance exercise with your wife or partner to create oxytocin hormones.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 18, 2011
at 03:28 AM

telomeres dont distinguish electrons from different carbs......they react to ROS and all carbs stimulate IGF-1 along with the BCCA. The key is inflammation which runners have to an excess. It is a scenario where we have both stick of dynamite and lit match in contact. Not good.

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on December 17, 2011
at 11:47 PM

I think so too. Most runners run too damn much and don't know how to take rest days.

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 17, 2011
at 08:01 PM

Translation???????

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on December 17, 2011
at 06:57 PM

But almost every long term marathoner I know eats thousands of calories of pasta and bread every day. I would love to see research on marathoners who eat high carb paleo, with mainly tubers as form of carbs.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:26 PM

dont bet cause vegas will be counting your chips.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:07 PM

Found it......http://jap.physiology.org/content/early/2011/02/10/japplphysiol.01280.2010.abstract

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5 Answers

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1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:05 PM

in feb 2010 there was a study that showed 100% of long term marathoners had cardiac fibrosis and the control group had none. cardiology literature is beginning to look here because of the astounding number of cardiac morbity and mortality in what appear to be healthy runners

Caveat emptor if you run distance.

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on December 17, 2011
at 06:57 PM

But almost every long term marathoner I know eats thousands of calories of pasta and bread every day. I would love to see research on marathoners who eat high carb paleo, with mainly tubers as form of carbs.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 01:07 PM

Found it......http://jap.physiology.org/content/early/2011/02/10/japplphysiol.01280.2010.abstract

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 18, 2011
at 03:28 AM

telomeres dont distinguish electrons from different carbs......they react to ROS and all carbs stimulate IGF-1 along with the BCCA. The key is inflammation which runners have to an excess. It is a scenario where we have both stick of dynamite and lit match in contact. Not good.

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:29 AM

This is different from high intensity interval training where there is ample chance for Na/K active pump restores its original equilibrium ratio. We try to live happy life by optimizing our body/brain hardware which are products of evolutions. If end results of evolution have limitations in restoring equiilibrium concentration of Na/K in atrial cells, I should enjoy other activities consistent with physiological optimum condition of evolution and I would be foolish to push against nature's limitations in design of pace maker in heart. Thanks, The Quilt ingyukoh

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on December 18, 2011
at 11:28 AM

The Quilt, thanks for reference which I studied with great interests. After reading this article, I conjecture that Na/K ratio in atrial cells deviates significantly from equilibrium value in endurance exercise due to insufficient opportunity for Na/K active pump to restore Na/K equilibrium concentration. If this hypothesis is correct, then even strict paleo athlete without any glycation complications should experience Na/K inequilibrium from continued endurance exercise.

3
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 10:59 PM

You're not going to get a lot of encouragement from this crowd, are you? Let's propose a Paleo-triathlete compromise.Oxymoron... Stop all the medium and long steady state traininng sessions.Do two HIIT workouts each week, rotating swim,bike and run. Lift weights twice a week. Do a SHORT steady state run, bike or swim once a week. Compete in the teentsey-weenseyiest distance triathlon you can find in your area ONCE a year. Save all remaining testosterone/growth hormone for your spouse or significant other.

1
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 17, 2011
at 10:43 AM

Isn't the main problem still the ridiculous amount of 'training' people do?

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on December 17, 2011
at 11:47 PM

I think so too. Most runners run too damn much and don't know how to take rest days.

1
25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 17, 2011
at 07:03 AM

I highly doubt such studies exist, either Re: paleo endurance athletes or endurance athletes eating beaucoup carbs vs. sedentary individuals eating a similar quantity of carbs and getting fat (if you are just talking %s of macros, those studies probably do exist). But if we assume, for the sake of argument, that training to maximize performance in endurance sports is intrinsically unhealthy and leads to all sorts of problems...is there any chance you could be happy swimming, running and cycling in more moderate "doses"?

3a567c1637db69f1455ce35e78201a2c

(1054)

on December 18, 2011
at 04:45 AM

It means if you bet your telomeres by training to max performance in moderate doses, you are going to lose. Do what shah78 says without the teentsey-weenseyiest triathion. Be happy doing high intensity endurance exercise with your wife or partner to create oxytocin hormones.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:26 PM

dont bet cause vegas will be counting your chips.

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on December 17, 2011
at 08:01 PM

Translation???????

0
Efba2b071e8f4c54acbc1da52ac91030

(199)

on January 06, 2013
at 02:15 AM

This is an interesting topic. I just came across this pilot study that suggests older endurance athletes actually have longer telomeres. Due to the small sample size, more research needs to happen. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0052769

I have often wondered why endurance athletes look so much older, is it because of excessive sun exposure? Or does an extremely low body-fat percentage give an older appearance?

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